Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: novels

  • 615 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>
  • Color Symbolism In Selected Novels - 455 words
    Color Symbolism In Selected Novels Marie de France uses several symbolic objects in her stories to get the point across. Sometimes what is the simplest object can have a thousands meanings. Whether you're talking about trees to the color of an article of clothing, there was a reason, a purpose for making it a weeping willow or a red scarf. You need to look deep within the story line and fine it's true meaning. In Yonec, Laustic and Milun, see the usage of birds, especially that of a swan. But why use birds? For the reasons that birds symbolize so many things such as love and romance, purity and redemption and forgiveness and the chance to start over. In Yonec and Laustic, both show extra-mar ...
    Related: novels, symbolism, true meaning, fairy tale, nobility
  • For Almost Three Decades, Michael Crichton Has Written Novels That Appeal To His Readers Imagination And Take A Firm Hold Of - 1,909 words
    For almost three decades, Michael Crichton has written novels that appeal to his reader=s imagination and take a firm hold of their pocketbooks. Crichton=s writing stands out as much as his 6=9@ frame. He has become one of the most widely read and bought science fiction authors of the past three decades. From his first novel The Andromeda Strain, which he published while in medical school, to his most recent Airframe, Crichton has captivated his readers and left them craving more. What makes Crichton=s novels unique are their topics. Criction=s fiction novels have topics that range from little known historical events to indistinct scientific topics, such as cloning and primate communication. ...
    Related: appeal, crichton, firm, imagination, john michael, michael, michael crichton
  • For The Last Few Decades, Cloning Was A Fictitious Idea That Lay Deep Within The Pages Of Some Scifi Novels The Very Idea Tha - 933 words
    For the last few decades, cloning was a fictitious idea that lay deep within the pages of some sci-fi novels. The very idea that cloning could one day become reality was thought to be a scientific impossibility by many experts but on one exhilarating day, what was thought to be "purely fiction" became reality. That fine day was February 22, 1997. A team from the Roslin Institute which was lead by Dr. Ian Wilmut changed the face of history forever by revealing what looked like an average sheep. That sheep was what was going to be one of the most famous if not the most famous sheep in modern day. Dolly was this seven month old Trojan lambs name and Dolly was the first ever clone of a mammal. S ...
    Related: cloning, fictitious, human cloning, novels, pages
  • Hurston Novels - 1,247 words
    Hurston Novels The Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s is a great time for black artists; it is a rebirth of art, music, books and poetry. In Zora Neale Hurstons novel Their Eyes Were Watching God Janie, the protagonist, is treated kindly for a black women. She does not go through the torment of black culture during that era or the previous eras. Throughout the book Hurston "fibs" about racial oppression. Janie gets respect by the white people she encounters. Hurston makes the reader imagine that African-American life is easygoing. Richard Writes critique of Their Eyes Were Watching God is accurate and therefore, the book should not be included in the Harlem Renaissance. Hurston breaks several o ...
    Related: hurston, novels, african american, american life, diction
  • Jane Austen: Background Of Her Novels - 1,236 words
    Jane Austen: Background of Her Novels First published in 1813, Pride and Prejudice has consistently been Jane Austen's most popular novel. It portrays life in the genteel rural society of the day, and tells of the initial misunderstandings and later mutual enlightenment between Elizabeth Bennet (whose liveliness and quick wit have often attracted readers) and the haughty Darcy. The title Pride and Prejudice refers (among other things) to the ways in which Elizabeth and Darcy first view each other. The original version of the novel was written in 1796-1797 under the title First Impressions, and was probably in the form of an exchange of letters. Jane Austen's own tongue-in-cheek opinion of he ...
    Related: jane, jane austen, novels, pride and prejudice, walter scott
  • Jane Austen: Background Of Her Novels - 1,238 words
    ... lancingly to the slave trade and slavery in her novels, though she was aware of contemporary debates on the subject. Mansfield Park was one of only two of Jane Austen's novels to be revised by her after its first publication, when a second edition came out in 1816 (this second edition was a failure in terms of sales). Emma Emma, published in 1815, has been described as a "mystery story without a murder". The eponymous heroine is the charming (but perhaps too clever for her own good) Emma Woodhouse, who manages to deceive herself in a number of ways (including as to who is really the object of her own affections), even though she (and the reader) are often in possession of evidence pointi ...
    Related: jane, jane austen, novels, sense and sensibility, mansfield park
  • Janette Turner Hospital: 4 Vivid Female Characters In Her Two Novels - 1,621 words
    Janette Turner Hospital: 4 Vivid Female Characters In Her Two Novels With " beautifully executed images" , Janette Turner Hospital creates four vivid female character in her two novels. The four characters are Juliet and Yashoda in The Ivory Swing and Elizabeth and Emily in The Tiger in the Tiger Pit . Each of the above is invested by Turner Hospital with a deep consciousness. In the view of Janette Turner Hospital, women are immensely uncertain. They are never sure of what they want. However, when it comes to dealing with external conflicts, they are very strong-willed. On the other hand, she also indicates that maternal love is strong. Women have passionate beliefs in the importance of the ...
    Related: female characters, novels, turner, vivid, indian woman
  • Title: 5 Novels - 1,678 words
    Title: 5 Novels Author: Daniel Pinkwater Category: Sci- Fiction, Fiction Settings: First story: in Hogboro, New York. Second story: Earth and the planet Spiegel. Third story: Genghis Khan High School. Forth: Rochester New York. Fifth: Margaret Himmler High School. Time Period: 1990's Alan Mendelson, the boy from mars: Leonard Neeble. Alan Mendelson. Samuel Klugarsh. Clarence Yojimbo. Leonard Neeble is the new kid at school. No one really likes him, but he doesnt care. Hes a real smart boy, but he found out if he acted dumb, no one would notice him. His grades are failing and his parents send him to a psychology just about the same time a new kid arrives at school. His name is Alan Mendelson, ...
    Related: novels, comic book, genghis khan, young adult, mendelson
  • When I First Saw The Movie Frankenstein, I Realized That Hollywood Was Still Changing The Classic Novels In Their Usual Fashi - 750 words
    When I first saw the movie Frankenstein, I realized that Hollywood was still changing the classic novels. In their usual fashion, they changed the names of the characters to be somewhat pleasing to the audience. I guess Henry Frankenstein was a better wholesome name than Victor Frankenstein. Instead they saved the name Victor for the supporting actor because no one would care what they named him. Next they changed Elizabeth to Margaret for some unknown reason. By movie standards today, the monster looked like a man in bad makeup and stiff acting. In Mary Shelleys original interpretation, I envision a monster with pale Caucasian skin color, misshapen limbs and with more vocabularies than Ugh ...
    Related: classic, hollywood, movie review, novels, usual
  • 15 Geog 123 - 1,575 words
    15 - GEOG - 123 Anthony November 22, 2000 Travels In Alaska Travels in Alaska takes readers on a trip to Alaska through the vivid descriptions of the author, John Muir. The book is based on journals Muir wrote during his visits to Alaska in 1879, 1880, and 1890. These chronicles of his journey relate his observations of nature, glaciers, and the many people he met. Traveling on foot, by canoe, and dogsled Muir experienced excitement discovering unfamiliar types of lands and animals. Each summer Muir and his new found Presbyterian missionary friend S. Hall Young accompanied by Tlingit Indian guides launched extensive voyages of discovery in a thirty foot canoe. John Muir was a naturalists who ...
    Related: typical american, john muir, gold rush, oval, exploration
  • 1984 - 661 words
    1984 1984 as an Anti-Utopian Novel A utopia is an ideal or perfect community. While some writers have created fictional places that embody their ideals societies, other writers have written satires that ridicule existing conditions of society, or anti-utopias, which show possible future societies that are anything but ideal. In 1984 , George Orwell presents a terrifying picture of future as life under the constant surveillance of Big Brother. This book 1984 is an anti-utopian novel. The main character Winston Smith lives in the large political country Oceania, which is eternally at war with one of two huge countries, Eurasia and Eastasia. At any moment all existing records show either that O ...
    Related: 1984, love affair, works cited, george orwell, affair
  • 1984 - 1,144 words
    1984 1984, by George Orwell (Pen Name), is a dystopian (opposite of utopia, imperfect) novel that presents the reader with a sense of despair for the characters. George Orwell, whose actual name is Eric Arthur Blair, was born in Motihari, India, June 25, 1903and died in London, England, January 21,1950. He was a prominent author in the 1940s of two satires that attacked the idea of totalitarianism. The novels and essays and such written in the 1930s established him as an influential voice of the century. Orwells' parents were members of the Indian Civil Service; he went to college in London and after wards joined the imperial police. During his service, he wrote his first novel, Down and out ...
    Related: 1984, eric arthur blair, animal farm, lower class, shop
  • 1984 - 834 words
    1984 "Few novels written in this generation have obtained a popularity as great as that of George Orwells 1984." George Orwells popular and powerful novel was not just a figment of his imagination, it was spawned from many experiences from childhood to early adulthood, as well as from events circa World War II. At age eight, he was shipped off to boarding school where he was the only scholarship student among aristocrats. This was Orwells first taste of dictatorship, of being helpless under the rule of an absolute power. Unlike his classmates, Orwell was unable to afford to go to Oxford or Cambridge and his grades kept him from winning any more scholarships (Scott-Kilvert, 98). Therefore, he ...
    Related: 1984, early adulthood, marshall cavendish corporation, methods used, police
  • 1984 And Brave New World - 1,196 words
    1984 And Brave New World In Orwells Nineteen Eighty-Four and Huxleys Brave New World, the authoritative figures strive for freedom, peace, and stability for all, to develop a utopian society. The Utopian society strives for a perfect state of well-being for all persons in the community, and over-emphasizes this factor, where no person is exposed to the reality of the world. As each novel progresses we see that neither society possesses family values nor attempts to practice them. Neither are passionate nor creative in factors such as love, language, history and literature. Our society today, in general, is unsure about the future: The nightmare of total organization has emerged from the safe ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, society today, aldous huxley
  • 1984 And Brave New World - 1,196 words
    ... hidden beneath the dark mustache. O cruel, needless misunderstanding! O stubborn, self-willed exile from the loving breast! Two gin-scented tears trickled down the sides of his nose. But it was all right, everything was all right, the struggle was finished. He had won the victory over himself. He loved Big Brother. This shows the power that the Party and OBrien has had over Winston; they have taken his old understanding and beliefs and transformed them into an attitude that complies with those of the Party. The conditioning of an individual for a utopian society often results in the repression of individuality. Both novels attempt to create a utopian society. The major thing that holds t ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, utopian society, breast feeding
  • 1984 By George Orwell - 983 words
    1984 By George Orwell "War is peace. Freedom is slavery. Ignorance is strength." This is the slogan of the Ministry of Truth, a branch of the totalitarian government in post-war London. The figurehead of this government is Big Brother, who employs a vast army of informers called the Thought Police who watch and listen to every citizen at all times through a device called a telescreen for the least signs of criminal deviation or unorthodox thoughts. This novel, like Orwells earlier work Animal Farm and Aldous Huxleys Brave New World, is an example of anti-utopian fiction, that kind of fiction which shows man at the mercy of some force over which he has no control. Anti-utopian novels are usua ...
    Related: 1984, george orwell, orwell, brave new world, human experience
  • 65279 It Is Unusual When A Masterpiece Develops Out Of An Assignment, But That Is, More Or Less, What - 1,904 words
    It is unusual when a masterpiece develops out of an assignment, but that is, more or less, what happened in the case of Gullivers Travels. The Martinus Scriblerus Club proposed to satirize the follies and vices of learned, scientific and modern men. Each of the members was given a topic, and Swifts was to satirize the numerous and popular volumes describing voyages to faraway lands. Ten years passed between the Scriblerus project and the publication of Gullivers Travels, but when Swift finished, he had completed a definitive work in travel literature. Moreover, he had completed what was to become a childrens classic (in its abridged form) and a satiric masterpiece. Swifts main character, Gul ...
    Related: masterpiece, unusual, make sense, time passes, principal
  • A Book Review On The Unbearable Lightness Of Being - 992 words
    ... a special relationship. They could go on erotic rendezvous filled with games and adventures and yet they could make sweet love without saying a word and feel as if they are the last two people on earth. But with her, Tomas felt this certain emptiness within him unlike how he felt with Tereza. With Sabina, everything was there for the taking; nothing about her was a burden. This made her very light. His life with her had no meaning and burden at all. Without that certain feeling of burden, Tomas felt he really didnt love Sabina. Sabina and Franz were lovers who did not understand each other. When they would sit down and talk about their own lives and share it with each other, he would li ...
    Related: book reports, book review, lightness, unbearable, short story
  • A Call To Arms Style And Tone - 525 words
    A Call to Arms - Style and Tone A Call to Arms - Style and Tone "After a while I went out and left the hospital and walked back to the hotel in the rain" (332). This last line of the novel gives an understanding of Ernest Hemingway's style and tone. The overall tone of the book is much different than that of The Sun Also Rises. The characters in the book are propelled by outside forces, in this case WWI, where the characters in The Sun Also Rises seemed to have no direction. Frederick's actions are determined by his position until he deserts the army. Floating down the river with barely a hold on a piece of wood his life, he abandons everything except Catherine and lets the river take him to ...
    Related: a farewell to arms, farewell to arms, tone, stream of consciousness, love story
  • A Clockwork Orange - 394 words
    A Clockwork Orange The movie A Clockwork Orange takes place in the future of London. Anthony Burgess originally wrote it. Later on made into a movie, and directed by Stanley Kubrick. The movie is to represent ultra-violence and how there is no scientific cure yet. The social context is very violent in the beginning showing scenes of rape and assault. The movie shows a violent killer and rapist, and an attempt to cure him that fails. The author of A Clockwork Orange is Anthony Burgess, also went by the name Joseph Kell. He was born on February 25, 1917, in Manchester. His family was middle class, and their religious background was Catholic. His family life was not easy. His father was a cashi ...
    Related: a clockwork orange, clockwork, clockwork orange, orange, grammar school
  • 615 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>