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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: nova scotia

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  • Rise And Fall Of The Nova Scotia Coal Industry - 1,483 words
    Rise And Fall Of The Nova Scotia Coal Industry Introduction Coal mining has always been an important component of Nova Scotia's economy, landscape and culture. Together with cod fishing it was the primary export and employer for the regions population. With both industries now failing, the poor economic climate will no doubt have an effect on the population. This paper attempts to examine the economic conditions, market forces, and political maneuvering that gave rise to the coal industry in Nova Scotia as well as those contributing to its demise. Coal Formation The first stage in the formation of the fossil fuel we know as coal is large accumulations of organic matter, an anoxic environment ...
    Related: coal, coal mining, mining industry, nova, nova scotia
  • Rise And Fall Of The Nova Scotia Coal Industry - 1,537 words
    ... sulfur dioxide (SO2). This gas is toxic and can be severely irritating to the eyes and lungs. In the atmosphere sulfur dioxide combines with water vapour to produce sulfuric acid which is then removed through precipitation and it falls to earth as acid rain. There are presently methods available that are able to remove some of the sulfur from coal prior to burning but the process is expensive and only partially successful. Another alternative is burning low sulfur coal but more often than not this coal is lower quality coal and more of it must be burnt in order to get the same output of energy (Montgomery, 1990). It is also possible to remove the sulfur gases after the coal is burnt but ...
    Related: coal, coal mining, mining industry, nova, nova scotia
  • Acid - 1,218 words
    Acid Rain Acid rain is a serious problem with disastrous effects. Each day this serious problem increases. Many people believe that this issue is too small to deal with right now, and others believe it should be met head on. In the following paragraphs I will be discussing the impact of acid rain effects on wildlife and how our atmosphere is being destroyed. Causes Acid rain is a cancer, eating into the face of Eastern Canada and the North Eastern United States. In Canada, the main sulphuric acid sources are non-ferrous smelters and power generation. On both sides of the border, automobiles are the main sources for nitric acid (about 40% of the total). Power generating plants, industrial com ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, great lakes, disease prevention, bear
  • Airline Safety - 957 words
    ... MD11 crashed near Halifax, Canada: The aircraft was on a nonstop flight from New York's JFK airport to Geneva. The aircraft crashed at night in the Atlantic Ocean close to shore about 50 miles (80 km) southwest of Halifax, Nova Scotia. All 15 crewmembers and 214 passengers were killed. These are just the most recent accidents in the past decade. Almost of all of these tragedies can be avoided with harsher regulations, but they have to implemented first. Interest Groups and Elected Officials Sections One group that is highly involved in airline safety is the National Transportation Safety Board. The NTSB is a small, non-regulatory, independent agency with about 400 employees. At a cost o ...
    Related: airline, aviation safety, national safety, national transportation safety board, safety regulations, transportation safety board
  • American Revolution - 3,384 words
    American Revolution In the aftermath of the French and Indian War, Britain needed a new imperial design, but the situation in America was anything but favorable to change. Long accustomed to a large measure of independence, the colonies were demanding more, not less, freedom, particularly now that the French menace had been eliminated. To put a new system into effect, and to tighten control, Parliament had to contend with colonists trained in self-government and impatient with interference. One of the first things that British attempted was the organization of the interior. The conquest of Canada and of the Ohio Valley necessitated policies that would not alienate the French and Indian inhab ...
    Related: american, american affairs, american colonies, american population, american revolution, american revolutionary, american revolutionary war
  • Canadian National Unity - 1,756 words
    ... esses that so much redundancy exists in administration and so much money is spent on bilingualization and transferred needlessly from rich province to poor province in an effort to keep Quebec inside the confederation that after separation both Quebec and English-speaking Canada would be better off, financially and otherwise. Without addressing this contention, the same assumption occurs here: after Quebec leaves, Canada remains united. The assumption that Quebec voters would not accept the economic costs and risks of separation and were not subject to romantic sentiment on this issue proved wrong. Until a week before the referendum, virtually no one predicted the closeness of the vote. ...
    Related: canadian, canadian economy, national history, national policy, unity
  • Charles Inglis - 211 words
    Charles Inglis Charles Inglis was born in Donegal, Ireland in 1734. As an Anglican clergyman and a Loyalist, he came to America. He became a teacher and then was ordained to London, England in 1758. He returned though to America in 1759 to be a missionary in Dover, Delaware until 1765. In late 1765, Charles Inglis worked with Rev. Thomas B. Chandler as assistant to the rector of Trinity Church in New York City. During this time he worked for establishment of an American diocese. After the outbreak of the Revolution in 1776, Charles Inglis answered Thomas Paine's Common Sense and it was titled The True Interest of America. Following Rev. Samuel Auchmuty, Charles Inglis became Rector of Trinit ...
    Related: inglis, london england, nova scotia, york city, nova
  • Control As Enterprise: Reflections On Privatization And Criminal Justice - 2,820 words
    Control As Enterprise: Reflections On Privatization And Criminal Justice Thank you very much for the welcome, and for giving my talk. When the Fraser Institute called me last year, they rang up and said they were having a conference and we would like to invite you, and I thought I think you have the wrong person. Basically, everybody else there, except myself and one person from Nova Scotia, were in favour of privatization and very strongly in favour of it, especially with respect to prisons. It was actually very educational and interesting to engage in that debate. First of all I would like to thank you very much for the invitation and to wish you all the best with your new programme. I am ...
    Related: crime control, criminal, criminal justice, justice system, privatization
  • Copernicus - 581 words
    Copernicus Nicolas Copernicus Nicolas Copernicus 1473-1543 Physics February 8, 2000 Nicolas Copernicus Nicolas Copernicus 1473-1543 Copernicus was born in Poland in 1473, he started his education at Cracow University. There he studied mathematics and optics. From here he went to Italy, where he was appointed as a canon in the cathedral of Frauenburg, where he spent a comfortable academic life studding. Copernicus had some small hobbies while at the cathedral, he painted, and frequently translated Greek poetry into Latin. One other hobby that just wasn't small enough to be called a hobby to most of us was astronomy. He made investigations quietly and alone, without any help. He observed from ...
    Related: copernicus, solar system, universal gravitation, seventeenth century, optics
  • European Exploration And Settlement - 527 words
    European Exploration and Settlement I. Europeans Look to New Worlds For Many Reasons. A. Renaissance- revival of classical art, literature, and learning. 1. Took place in Europe in 15th and 16th centuries. 2. Sparked imaginations and made people eager to explore. B. Protestant Reformation 1. Challenged Catholics who in turn persecuted Protestants. 2. Protestants longed for a place where they could worship as they wanted. C. European Nations Begin to Form Stable Governments and Resolve Power Struggles. D. Trying to Find a Quicker Route to Asia and Start Up a Rich Trade. E. New Developments in Travel. 1. Caravel- more maneuverable and quicker ship, moved with and against wind. 2. Navigation- c ...
    Related: european nations, exploration, settlement, native people, john cabot
  • Everglades - 588 words
    Everglades The Everglades is a unique wetland ecosystem on the margin of the tropics. Its slow flow of water supports grasslands, thick forests, and a diverse group of animal, fish, and bird. The Everglades originated between 8000 to 10,000 years ago at the end of the most recent of the ice age. The melting of the glaciers caused the sea levels to rise and form a low-lying basin into a swamp. The climate of the Everglades is tropical savanna caused by hot, wet summers and warm, dry winters. The average annual rainfall exceeds 50 inches. Cypress, mangrove thickets, palms, live oaks, pines and lush vegetation cover the numerous inlets. Wildlife, although severely reduced in number and diversit ...
    Related: everglades, north america, long distance, food chain, abundant
  • Evolution Of Canada - 1,564 words
    Evolution of Canada Canada, independent nation in North America. A country rich in minerals and agriculture, it was settled by the French and English and became an independent Commonwealth country with a federal system of government, in which the provinces enjoy a large measure of autonomy. Land and Economy. The 2nd-largest country in the world (after the USSR), Canada occupies the N half of the North American continent, stretching E and W from the Atlantic to Pacific oceans, N from the 49th parallel to the North Pole, including all the islands in the Arctic Ocean from W of Greenland to Alaska. It is divided into 10 provinces, which are (E-W): Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, ...
    Related: canada, evolution, lower canada, trade area, president ronald reagan
  • Fabric Trade Form India To Canada - 2,918 words
    Fabric Trade Form India To Canada Canada, with its economic and political stability offers a variety of business opportunities. With such a large population of immigrants, Canada is known for its acceptance of diverse cultures. English and French are Canada's official languages and there are many other languages spoken freely by diverse racial groups on Canadian soil. Many different religions are also practiced freely and peacefully in Canada. India has a population of 986.6 million people. This country holds 15 % of the world's entire population. Within this country, a variety of cultures and traditions can be found. Christianity, Hinduism as well as the Muslim religion are all practiced fr ...
    Related: canada, fabric, india, north india, northern india, ontario canada, south india
  • Fabric Trade Form India To Canada - 3,005 words
    ... two levels. At the first level is the Provincial Court, which deals with most criminal offences. This level may also include Small Claims courts, which deal with private disputes involving limited sums of money, and Youth and Family courts. Judges at this level are appointed by the provinces. At the second level is the provincial Superior Court, which deals with the trial of the most serious criminal and civil cases. Above this level of court is the provincial Court of Appeal, which hears appeals from the lower courts. Judges at these levels are appointed by the federal government. 3.2.4 Fiscal Characteristics Canadas budget revenues $79.2 billion expenditures $102.0 billion, including c ...
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  • French Canadians In Ne - 2,423 words
    French Canadians In Ne French Canadians & The Blackstone Valley John J. Barron Ethnicity in Massachusetts Wed. 12:30 The French have a lengthy history on this continent. The French became interested in the New World in 1524 when King Francois I sought wealth for his European domain (Brown 19). Expeditions were underwritten by the crown. It was eager to compete with other European powers in search for riches. Included in the early voyages were trips by Frenchman Jacques Cartier. Cartier discovered the Gulf of St. Lawrence in 1534 (Brown 21). He made further excursions toward the heartland of the continent, resulting in vast land claims. Another early visitor to America, Samuel de Champlain, o ...
    Related: french canadian, french canadians, roman catholic, new france, retreat
  • Giovanni Da Verrazano - 504 words
    Giovanni Da Verrazano annon Giovanni da Verrazano was a Florentine explorer and navigator. Although he was Italian, he was employed by the kind of France to find a passage to the Pacific Ocean. The exact date of his birth and death are not known, but historians believe that he was born in 1480, and he died in 1527. In 1524, he started on a voyage and discovered Cape Fear. He is believed to have been the first European to sight the New York Bay, but it was not explored until Henry Hudson's voyage in 1609. Verrazono also explored the North Carolina coast and he visited the Chesapeake region and then northward to Nova Scotia. In fact, he explored much of the American coast line. When Giovanni w ...
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  • Health And Body - 1,739 words
    Health And Body In all parts of life there are periods of adversity that we must face, the real challenge however, is what and how we gain from conquering those trials. There have been many times that I have been faced with adversity, it has happened in all aspects of my life at one time or another. Whether it is dealing with the ups and downs of hockey or balancing the pressure that comes with an elite hockey schedule and high school, there are always obstacles. Some of these challenges can bring about positive effects that influence the path of one's life. In one such experience of mine, the amount of adversity was not near as great as the positive out come that came from my experience. It ...
    Related: health, health professionals, human body, high school, positive effects
  • Hockey History - 1,322 words
    Hockey History For more than a century, hockey historians have found that precisely tracing the sports origin is not only a difficult task but, a virtual impossibility. Therefore I can only try to deduce for myself, from the records, claims, and accounts, which are available to me, when, where, and by whom the first ice hockey was played. Ill also discuss the early problems and obstacles that the NHL encountered. Plus I will also tell a little bit about early equipment, along with early game play and ice conditions that players encountered. Lastly, the Stanley Cup, which is the most prized and oldest sports award of the NHL. It has been won many times, by many different teams. Ice hockey is ...
    Related: history, hockey, royal canadian, north american, entertainment
  • Hopewell Culture - 1,813 words
    Hopewell Culture Studied since the discovery of the conspicuous mounds in Ross County Ohio, the Hopewell have been an archaeological enigma to many. The tradition is so named for the owner of the farm, Captain Hopewell, where over thirty mounds were discovered. Earlier studies focused more on the exotic grave goods such as precious metals, freshwater pearls, many of these objects had come from all corners of the continent from the Rocky Mountains to the Gulf of Mexico, and north to the mid-Atlantic coastline (some say Hopewellian influence reached Nova Scotia). Earlier scholars of the Hopewell (1950s through 1960s) were well aware of the influence of the "Interaction Sphere", yet concluded t ...
    Related: hopewell, food sources, technological innovation, north america, harbor
  • Infestation - 702 words
    Infestation A little bug is causing a big debate amongst government officials and citizens in the Halifax municipality. The little pest in particular is known as the brown spruce longhorn beetle, and this beetle, native to Europe and believed to have arrived on a container ship about a decade ago, is threatening to ruin Halifax's largest and busiest park, and could have the potential to ruin all of Nova Scotia's, and even Canada's, vast forest is action is not taken. In order to hault the infestation, the Federal Court has given the Canadian Food Inspection Agency permission to cut down as many as 10 000 red spruce trees, many of which are not yet infested at all. Environmental activists suc ...
    Related: federal government, natural resources, federal court, ship, geography
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