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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: northern europe

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  • Acid - 1,218 words
    Acid Rain Acid rain is a serious problem with disastrous effects. Each day this serious problem increases. Many people believe that this issue is too small to deal with right now, and others believe it should be met head on. In the following paragraphs I will be discussing the impact of acid rain effects on wildlife and how our atmosphere is being destroyed. Causes Acid rain is a cancer, eating into the face of Eastern Canada and the North Eastern United States. In Canada, the main sulphuric acid sources are non-ferrous smelters and power generation. On both sides of the border, automobiles are the main sources for nitric acid (about 40% of the total). Power generating plants, industrial com ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, great lakes, disease prevention, bear
  • Acid Rain - 820 words
    Acid Rain For years ever since most of the world has been industrialized, the effects of pollution have plagued nations alike. Acid rain is one of the largest contributors to this industrialized form of pollution. Throughout this report an explanation of the devastating effects to the environment caused by acid rain will be given along with what is being done to stop it. Acid rain is made when pollutants arise from the use of coal in the production of electricity, from base- metal smelting and from fuel combustion in vehicles. Once the sulfur and nitrogen oxides from these man made causes are released into the air they are caught by wind currents and are blown hundreds of miles away. The gas ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, rain, northern europe, air pollution
  • Alfred Nobel His Prizes - 1,205 words
    Alfred Nobel & His Prizes In addressing hope, Alfred Nobel referred to it as nature's veil for hiding truth's nakedness2. Such a statement encompasses the struggle associated with Nobels lifework. Alfred Nobels existence spanned many realms of thought and being. He was a scientist, a writer, a philosopher and humanitarian, and ultimately a philanthropist. It was probably this myriad of influences and inspirations that injected him into the core of friction between science and society, between knowledge and application. This work will elucidate Nobels motivation for creating the Nobel Prize with the assertion that the prize is an instrument used to reconcile the incongruity between science an ...
    Related: alfred, alfred nobel, nobel, nobel prize, tsar nicholas
  • Chernobyl - 1,436 words
    Chernobyl The Chernobyl disaster on April 26, 1986 is described as one of the most frightening environmental disasters in the world. The plant was made up of four graphite reactors, which were the most modern Soviet reactors of the RBMK-type. Two more of these reactors were still under construction at the station. Chernobyl was an obscure town in north central Ukraine (former Soviet Union) on the Pripyiat River near the Belarus border. Immediately its name was joined to the Nuclear Power Plant located twenty-five kilometers upstream. The plant is actually located fifteen kilometers northwest of the city. It is not only the radioactive mess left that strikes fear. Nineteen similar stations ar ...
    Related: chernobyl, soviet union, power plants, nuclear program, fuel
  • Cultural Comparisons Ethnocentrism - 1,035 words
    ... ermine culture change. The Fuegians living at the southern tip of South America, as viewed by Charles Darwin on his voyage on the Beagle, lived in a very cold, harsh environment but were virtually without both clothing and dwellings. Diffusion Culture is contagious, as a prominent anthropologist once remarked, meaning that customs, beliefs, tools, techniques, folktales, ornaments, and so on may diffuse from one people or region to another. To be sure, a culture trait must offer some advantage, some utility or pleasure, to be sought and accepted by a people. (Some anthropologists have assumed that basic features of social structure, such as clan organization, may diffuse, but a sounder vi ...
    Related: cultural development, cultural evolution, ethnocentrism, modern europe, ancient egypt
  • Economic Geography - 3,518 words
    ... lation, who produces agricultural goods, is assumed completely immobile between regions, with a given peasant supply of (1-u)/2 in each region; workers are however mobile, moving to whichever location offers them a higher real income; and the total supply is constant: incorpora CorelEquation s  Farming takes place under CRS, thus farm labor used in producing any given quantity of agricultural goods can be set equal to production: incorpora CorelEquation s  Manufacturing, however, is characterised by IRS and, thus, involves fixed costs and constant marginal costs: incorpora CorelEquation s  Because the economy-wide supply is fixed, if incorpora CorelEquation s  is the forc ...
    Related: economic geography, economic integration, economic review, economic theory, european economic, geography
  • Electoral Basis Of The Twoparty System - 1,140 words
    Electoral Basis of the Two-Party System In the article Electoral Basis of the Two Party System by Maurice Duverger, the political party systems are dissected and looked at from many points of view. Democratic countries can have the political party system range from a two party system, such as the one in the United States, to a many party system, such as the party system in France and Italy. This article also gives the specific views of those few people whom are opposed to the political party systems as well as those few that are for the political party systems. In speaking of those that are in opposition to the political party system, many views and opinions are expressed. The political part ...
    Related: electoral, party system, basic education, point of view, suit
  • Fashion Of 16th Century - 1,566 words
    ... looped up in front to display the contrasting skirt of the underdress. Trains on outer gowns often had decorative underlinings. The train was buttoned or pinned to the waist at the back in order to show the lining fabric. Most often dress necklines were square, with the edge of the chemise visible; they might be cut with smaller or larger V-shaped openings at the front or at both front and back. Lacings held the V-shaped opening together. Bodices (the upper part of the dress) were fitted, skirts were long and full, flaring gently from the waistline to the floor in the front and trailing into long trains at the back. There were several different sleeve styles which included smooth-fittin ...
    Related: fashion, social science, book encyclopedia, publishing company, boucher
  • Gothic Sculpture - 395 words
    Gothic Sculpture In the Gothic period, remarkable sculpture was produced in France, Germany, and Italy. As in Romanesque times, much of it was made in conjunction with church architecture, although sculptured figures are also found on tombs, pulpits, and other church furnishings. France The great cathedral at Chartres exemplifies the stylistic evolution of the Gothic, which can be traced in viewing its portals. Its west entrance, the earliest, built in the mid-12th century, displays rigid, columnar figures with schematic drapery and similar, almost undifferentiated facial expressions; the later portals, on the north and south transepts, show greater differentiation of personality and costume ...
    Related: gothic, gothic period, sculpture, german expressionism, first women
  • Hockey History - 1,322 words
    Hockey History For more than a century, hockey historians have found that precisely tracing the sports origin is not only a difficult task but, a virtual impossibility. Therefore I can only try to deduce for myself, from the records, claims, and accounts, which are available to me, when, where, and by whom the first ice hockey was played. Ill also discuss the early problems and obstacles that the NHL encountered. Plus I will also tell a little bit about early equipment, along with early game play and ice conditions that players encountered. Lastly, the Stanley Cup, which is the most prized and oldest sports award of the NHL. It has been won many times, by many different teams. Ice hockey is ...
    Related: history, hockey, royal canadian, north american, entertainment
  • Immigration - 367 words
    Immigration subject = history title = Immigration Immigration Early immigration to Canada was generated by a network of emigration agents who were salesman who advertised to Canadas attractions to prospected immigrants. They targeted wealthy farmers, agricultural laborers and female domestics, preferably from Great Britain, the United States and Northern Europe. Canadas first immigration legislation, the Immigration Act of 1869 reflected the laissez-faire philosophy of the time by not saying which classes of immigrants should be admitted but , merely that the "governor" could prohibit the landing of pauper or destitute immigrants at any Canadian port. The Chinese, who were arriving in large ...
    Related: chinese immigration, immigration, world war 1, northern europe, restriction
  • Introduction - 1,587 words
    Introduction Throughout history, there have been many good and bad rulers, from the bravery of Alexander the Great, to the madness of George III. None, however, helped shape European feudalism like Charlemagne, King of the Franks, First of the Holy Roman Emperors. His advancements in government were not his only advancements though. He created an educational system for his people. While far behind the public and private educational systems of today, in the 8th and 9th century, it was a start. He also helped spread Christianity throughout Europe. Born in Northern Europe in 752, he was to become one of history's great leaders, and precursor to the Holy Roman Empire. Brief History of the Line o ...
    Related: great leaders, educational system, northern europe, session, loyal
  • Jerusalem Israel - 328 words
    Jerusalem Israel Jerusalem Jerusalem is located in the heart of Israel and is divided into three sections: the Old City, New City (West Jerusalem), and East Jerusalem. In the center is the Old City which is split up into four main sections: Muslim Quarter, Jewish Quarter, Christian Quarter, and the Armenian Quarter. Also, the Old City is the site of many religious and historical landmarks. Within Jewish Quarters, the main attraction is the Western (Wailing) Wall Wall). It's dubbed the Wailing Wall because many Jews come to pray there, and their prayers sound like wailing. The Wall is the small remaining part of King Solomon's Temple. After the Jews were banished from Temple Mount, the Wester ...
    Related: east jerusalem, israel, jerusalem, king solomon, temple mount
  • Lord Of The Rings: Picked Apart - 1,203 words
    Lord of the Rings: Picked Apart Free Swiss Anti-Wrinkle Cream. You Won't Believe Your Eyes! [an error occurred while processing this directive] Lord of the Rings: Picked Apart Imagine yourself in a pre-industrial world full of mystery and magic. Imagine a world full of monsters, demons, and danger, as well as a world full of friends, fairies, good wizards, and adventure. In doing so you have just taken your first step onto a vast world created by author and scholar John Ronald Reuel Tolkien. Tolkien became fascinated by language at an early age during his schooling, in particularly, the languages of Northern Europe, both ancient and modern. This affinity for language did not only lead to his ...
    Related: lord of the rings, free will, religious symbolism, human beings, profession
  • Martin Luther Protestant Reformation - 1,678 words
    ... received his priesthood. He was then sent to Wittenberg, where he held the professorship of moral philosophy for a year are so before returning to Efurt. Around 1512, Luther fell into a depression. He was plagued by the feeling that he was unable to fulfill God's wishes. But from this depression sprang illumination. Luther began to develop ideas which would eventually become the groundwork for Protestantism. He saw the theory of original sin and redemption for it as a selfish form of idolatry. He cited Paul's Epistle to Rome as showing God to be a beneficent creator filled with love, not condemnation. The forgiveness of sin wasn't a holy ritual which miraculously wiped away a person's si ...
    Related: counter reformation, luther, martin, martin luther, protestant, protestant reformation, reformation
  • Medieval Music - 1,247 words
    Medieval Music Music of the Middle Ages made great advancements through the centuries, which many are still evident today. The Christian Church effected the development of music greatly during the middle ages. The first major type of music of this time was chanting. The early Christians inherited the Jewish chants of synagogues.(Bishop-324) Chants didnt have constant rhythm, every note was about the same length. They had only one melody ,usually in the major key of C. All the singers sang the same notes together, this is called monophonic. Chants became an significant part of the church service, they were sung throughout the mass. These first chants were just sung by the congregation, later ...
    Related: folk music, medieval, medieval music, medieval times, music
  • Multiple Sclerosis - 2,166 words
    Multiple Sclerosis Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, often disabling disease that randomly attacks the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). The progress, severity and specific symptoms of the disease can not be predicted; symptoms may range from tingling and numbness to paralysis and blindness. MS is a devastating disease because people live with its unpredictable physical and emotional effects for the rest of their lives. MS is a well-known disease, but poorly understood. In the United States there are approximately 200 new cases diagnosed each week; MS is a common disease and not always caused by genetics. Therefore, I feel we all need to have a better understanding of this ...
    Related: multiple, multiple sclerosis, sclerosis, cystic fibrosis, central nervous
  • Rocky Mountains - 3,661 words
    ... rp. Historically, a number of Native American peoples lived in the valley along the Missouri, including the Hidatsa, Crow, Iowa, Arikara, Blackfoot, and Sioux. The region was popular for buffalo hunting and agriculture, and the tribes used the river for commerce. In 1673 French-Canadian explorer Louis Jolliet and French missionary and explorer Jacques Marquette became the first Europeans to discover the Missouri when they came across the lower river during a journey down the Mississippi. The lower river became an important route for fur traders, who began to venture farther up the river. During the Lewis and Clark Expedition of 1804 to 1806, American explorers Meriwether Lewis and Willia ...
    Related: mountains, rocky, rocky mountains, great basin, northern united states
  • Roman Empire - 705 words
    Roman Empire The Roman Empire was a strong hold over the Mediterranean for many years. Being the goal of most all world leaders, the Romans wanted land along with their power. They set their eyes on the valuable lands around them and the Mediterranean world as well as parts of Northern Europe and Asia. The Roman civilization and culture was much influenced by the Phonetians and Greeks. Later, the Romans were in control of these lands and their people. Three of their prize provinces held at much value to them were Thrace, Macedonia, Greece. These three lands were all located in the same area, providing a throughway to Rome for trade routes from China and the Middle east. Thrace, being on the ...
    Related: empire, roman, roman civilization, roman empire, eastern orthodox
  • Romanesque Architecture - 3,014 words
    Romanesque Architecture THE BASILICA AND BASILICAN CHURCHES A great deal of conjecture has been expended on the question as to the genesis of the Roman basilica. For present purposes it may be sufficient to observe that the addition of aisles to the nave was so manifest a convenience that it might not improbably have been thought of, even had models not been at hand in the civic buildings of the Empire. The most suitable example that can be chosen as typical of the Roman basilica of the age of Constantine is the church of S. Maria Maggiore. And this, not merely because, in spite of certain modern alterations, it has kept in the main its original features, but also because it departs, to a le ...
    Related: architecture, gothic architecture, romanesque, early christian, middle ages
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