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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: northern africa

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  • African Museum - 1,576 words
    African Museum Wesam Berjaoui April. 01, 2000 Professor Gloster-Coates History 132 CRN# 24386 Museum Project The first museum I went to was my favorite. I went to the Museum for African Art displaying the Hair exhibit. The name of the exhibit sounded very uninteresting, but I was proven wrong. The first thing that I learned from this exhibit is that in Africa the way your hair is done represents your position in society. Your hair was probably one of the most important if not thee most important thing to an African person. A person was distinguished into which clan or group he or she was in by his or her hair style. If you were a very wealthy person your hair was extremely well done to make ...
    Related: african, african art, african people, metropolitan museum, museum
  • Alchemist - 1,622 words
    Alchemist Paulo Coelho was born in Rio de Janiero in 1947 and before his career as a best-selling author, he was a playwright, theatre director, hippie, and popular songwriter for some of Brazil's leading pop artists. In 1986 he took a pilgrimage along that Road of Santiago and this would be the center of the plot of the book, The Pilgrimage, which was published in 1987. His second book was named The Alchemist and was published in 1988. This book has gone to number one in 29 countries and Coelho has been regarded as the most widely read contemporary writers. The Alchemist was one of the top ten international best sellers of 1998. His work has been published in more than 100 countries and is ...
    Related: alchemist, different countries, south america, main character, hippie
  • Bald Eagles And Golden Eagles - 851 words
    Bald Eagles and Golden Eagles Eagle is the common name for a number of diurnal birds of prey, some of which are the largest members of their family which also includes kites, hawks, buzzards, and certain vultures. The name eagle is somewhat loosely applied, as several of the groups are not particularly closely related to one another, and some birds called hawks are larger than some called eagles. The Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus Leucocephalus) and the Golden Eagle (Aquila Chrysaetos) are two eagles that have several of the same characteristics and have several different ones as well. The Bald Eagle is the only eagle species living strictly in North America, and has a presence in every state in the ...
    Related: bald, bald eagle, golden, northern canada, founding fathers
  • Biomes Of The World - 1,092 words
    ... trees. The rain forest contains over 50% of worlds population in plants and animals. It covers roughly 5 billion acres of land. There are 3 layers of trees that can be found there. The first and most top layer is the emergent, which are widely spaced trees 100-120 ft tall with canopies above the general canopy of the forest. The second, middle layer is a closed canopy of 80-foot trees. Here light is available to this layer, but blocks out the light of lower lays. The third layer is a closed canopy of 60-foot trees. This is where little air movement occurs and there is high humidity. Another lower layer is the shrub/sapling layer. In this place of the forest less than 3% of light reaches ...
    Related: north america, south america, northern africa, tree, continuous
  • Camel - 442 words
    Camel More than 3,000 years ago an ungainly but useful desert aimal was domesticated in Arabia. It was the Arabian camel, a long-legged beast withone large hump on its back. It could cross hot deserts without needing much water, and it could carry heavy loads without tiring. The two-humped Bactrian camel of central Asia was also domesticated long ago. It is sturdier than the Arabian and can carry heavier loads. During the winter, its brownish hair is thick and long for protection from the cold nights. It sheds is hair in patches in the spring, as the weather warms up. Camels are hornless hoofed mammals. Their hoofs are like leathery pads. Their toes spread apart when they walk on sand o snow ...
    Related: camel, south africa, body weight, northern africa, africa
  • Cleopatra - 1,838 words
    Cleopatra Cleopatra was queen of Egypt, last ruler of the dynasty founded by Ptolemy, a Macedonian general of Alexander the Great, who took Egypt as his share in dividing Alexanders empire. Her capital, Alexander, founded by Alexander the Great, was the center of Hellenistic Greek culture of the world at that time, as well as a great commercial center. Although she imagined as a "beautiful and glamorous woman today, she was not very attractively depicted on ancient coins, having a long hook nose, and masculine features" (Flamarion 181). She deemed to be a strong-willed Macedonian queen who was brilliant and dreamed of a greater world empire. Highly intelligent, this shrewd politician almost ...
    Related: antony and cleopatra, cleopatra, alexander the great, western europe, isis
  • Costa Del Sol - 608 words
    Costa Del Sol Costa Del Sol It is possible that the Neolithic revolution, the discovery of agriculture the passage of nomadic to sedentary peoples, reached Europe by way of Africa through what is known today as Andalusia. This historical center of influence, an east - west displacement, from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic began with a revolution that introduced the usage of metals and the arrival of colonizers from the east. A confluence of fertile lands, of metallurgy and fishing activities took place in this westernmost area that the Tartars once inhabited. This mysterious civilization that lived in the southern Iberian peninsula since the bronze ages, established the first known monarc ...
    Related: costa, open door, european nations, intellectual development, port
  • Egypt - 534 words
    Egypt I am visiting the country of Egypt. Egypt is a country in Africa. The Egyptian name for Egypt is jumhuriyat misr al-arabiyah, misr is the Egyptian word for Egypt. The national capital is Cairo. The location of Egypt is in northern Africa, bordering the Mediterranean Sea, between Libya and the Gaza strip. Egyptian land is a total of 995450 sq. Km and 6,00 sq. Km. Egypt is almost more than three times the size of New Mexico. The coastline is 2,450 km. Climate: the climate is desert type, hot, dry summers with moderate winters. The temperatures during the summer range from 114 degrees during day light to a minimum of 42 degrees after sunset. During the winter season the temperature drops ...
    Related: egypt, new mexico, gaza strip, natural hazards, catholic
  • Embalming Essay - 587 words
    Embalming Essay Embalming Embalming is a mortuary custom, the art of preserving bodies after death, generally by the use of chemical substances. It is believed to have originated among the Egyptians, probably before 4000 BC, and was used by them for more than 30 centuries. Much evidence demonstrates that embalming is religious in origin, conceived as a means of preparing the dead for the life after death. From the Egyptians, the practice of embalming spread to other ancient peoples, including the Assyrians, Jews, Persians, and Scythians. Ancient embalming methods consisted of removal of the brains and viscera, and the filling of bodily cavities with a mixture of balsamic herbs and other subs ...
    Related: embalming, alexander the great, american civil, civil war, soft
  • Evolution Of Humans - 1,518 words
    ... this time, East African mammals adapted to drier more open grassland conditions. It was about this time that the new form of human emerged in Africa, a hominid with a much larger brain, excellent vision, and limbs and hips fully adapted to an upright posture. Paleoanthropologists call this hominid Homo Erectus, a human much taller than its diminutive predecessors, standing on average five feet six inches tall, with hands capable of precision gripping and many kinds of tool-making. The skull is more rounded than those of earlier hominids, but still had a sloping forehead and retreating brow ridges. Homo Erectus was more numerous and more adaptable than Homo habilis, and, on present eviden ...
    Related: evolution, human activity, human development, human evolution, human history, human language, human race
  • Female Genital Mutation - 1,154 words
    Female Genital Mutation Struggling against genital mutilation in Sudan In the country of Sudan, in Northern Africa, there is a procedure that is tradition and is performed on most women called female genital mutilation, or FGM, which used to be known as female circumcision. It has been a normal practice for generations, but is now the subject for international controversy on the morality and safety of this procedure. It is now known that 82 percent of Sudanese woman have an extreme form of genital mutilation done on them, normally at a young age. This form of mutilation is called the Pharaonic form and includes the total removal of the clitoris and labia, and stitching together of the vulva, ...
    Related: female circumcision, female genital mutilation, female sexuality, genital, genital mutilation, mutation
  • George S Patton - 999 words
    ... ing and the first delivery of 20 tanks arrived and they became the 304th Tank Brigade. Patton was known all around Europe for the training he gave to his men. The men of the 304th were worked hard by Patton. He would drill them hard and was a stickler for discipline: All human beings have an innate resistance to obedience. Discipline removes this resistance and by constant repetition, makes obedience habitual and unconscious. His men were considered the best trained in Europe. Patton gave the best training he could give to their men, and their men the best they could give in response to Patton. On September 12, the Germans attacked but Patton failed and 104 of his 174 tanks got trapped i ...
    Related: general george, general patton, george s patton, patton, human beings
  • Gladitorial Combat - 948 words
    Gladitorial Combat Kyle Keown Mrs. Melony Jones World History 4th 2 November 2000 words The culture of Ancient Rome had a distinct way to entertain its citizens. Besides spending times at the baths, Romans found pleasure and delight in the "games" held at the local coliseum. These games were among the bloodiest displays of public amusement in the history of man. Professional wrestling and boxing today, do not come close to the disgusting horrors that the people of Rome took so much pleasure in observing. Although the games were very bloody and extremely brutal, often killing many men and animals, the Romans enjoyed the scenery of life and death being very near. Watching men fight and eventua ...
    Related: combat, works cited, ancient rome, roman empire, funeral
  • La Fiesta Brava - 1,741 words
    La Fiesta Brava by 1 La Fiesta Brava Bullfighting is a tradition, art and athletic sport combined in one. Bullfighting originated in the classical world. The first bullfights supposedly took place in Knossos, Greece, "a contest of some sort is depicted in a wall painting unearthed... dating from about 2000 BC. It shows male and female acrobats confronting a bull, grabbing its horns as it charges, and vaulting over its back." (Encarta) Bullfights stayed popular after the Greek era had declined, in Rome. The spectacle of bullfighting during this time period was scarcely an art form but pure sport. It was not until the Moors of North Africa conquered the Visigoths of Europe in 711 AD that bullf ...
    Related: harcourt brace, modern times, north africa, crowd, greece
  • Malthus And Africa - 1,378 words
    Malthus and Africa Africa, being a third world country with much economic oppression, is currently being debated in the General Assembly about whether or not it should have population control. Many experts believe that, if not controlled, the rate of the increasing population of Africa will have disastrous effects. Over two hundred years ago, a man by the name of Thomas Robert Malthus wrote an essay on the effects of population and the food supply titled "An Essay on the Principle of Population." This essay dealt with the growth of population and if not restrained, how it would destroy man's subsistence here on Earth (Geyer 1). Much of what he wrote applies to not only Africa, but also the e ...
    Related: africa, malthus, northern africa, thomas malthus, thomas robert malthus
  • Mosaics Of San Vitale - 1,989 words
    Mosaics Of San Vitale Mosaics of San Vitale ERIK BUNGO The church of San Vitale in Ravenna was dedicated to St. Vitalis. After the discovery of the bones of the reputed martyrs Agricola and his slave Vitalis at Bologna in the fourth century, Vitalis was widely venerated in the west. The church of which he is the patron saint in Ravenna was begun by Bishop Ecclesius in the second quarter of the sixth century, when the Goths still ruled there. Funds for its construction were supplied by Julianus Argentarius. The church was completed and consecrated by Bishop Maximian in 547/8, after control had passed to the Byzantines . San Vitale was built on an octagonal plan (Ills. 1), with eight heavy pie ...
    Related: vitale, northern africa, emperor justinian, mount sinai, glorify
  • Mourning Costumes In The 19th Century - 1,417 words
    Mourning Costumes In The 19Th Century Mourning Costume in the 19th Century The costume associated with mourning is vastly different in different cultures, but the meaning of mourning dress is relatively similar worldwide: to express respect for the dead, and to keep one's own appearance from distracting from the ceremonies surrounding death. In most of the western world, the color that dominates most mourners' wardrobes is black, while the style and cut of mourning clothes is relatively unaffected by their purpose. Especially in the 19th century, ceremonial dress retained its complexity and stylishness whether it was made of colorful prints or solids, for church wear, or the somber black of ...
    Related: mourning, queen victoria, different cultures, wuthering heights, decay
  • Music, Feelings And Arts - 2,952 words
    ... sting section of a work. In most cases, the composer eventually returns to the original key. Another important element of harmony is the cadence. This is a succession of chords that end a musical work or one of its sections. Most pieces of classical music end with a perfect cadence, which consists of a dominant chord followed by a tonic chord. A plagal cadence consists of a subdominant chord followed by a tonic chord. The Amen ending of a hymn is an example of a plagal cadence. Harmony has been a part of Western music for more than 1,000 years. However, Western composers' ideas about harmony have changed considerably over the centuries, particularly their ideas about consonance and disso ...
    Related: arts, southern united, religious music, young people, improvised
  • Muslim Vs Muslim - 1,591 words
    Muslim Vs. Muslim It may seem similar and it may not, but what we do know, is that they both believe that they are Muslims. The Islamic beliefs of the black American male and the males of the Middle East are the same. My argument lies in the question of whether or not Africans can call themselves true Muslims, believers and followers of the Islamic faith. To be considered a true Muslim you must follow the rules and regulations of the Islamic faith. What is Islam? Islam is defined as the complete acceptance of and obedience to the teachings of Allah (I. A. Ibrahim 45) As a Muslim you are to believe in Allah, who is incomparable. He has no son nor does he have a partner, he is unique and he is ...
    Related: muslim, fall apart, journal entry, christian belief, kang
  • Ottoman Empire - 1,439 words
    Ottoman Empire Around 1293 the chieftain of a nomadic Turkish tribe named Osman, founded an empire that would endure almost six hundred years. As this empire grew by conquering lands of the Byzantine Empire and beyond, it came to include, at its height, all of Asia Minor, Albania, Greece, Bulgaria, Yugoslavia, Romania, Egypt, Crete, Cyprus, Palestine, and North Africa through Algeria; parts of Hungry, Austria, Russia, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Oman, U.A.E., and Syria. The elite tactics and fearsome fighting of the well trained Janissary Corps helped make the Ottoman Empire one of the largest in the world's history. -1- The first "army" of the Ottoman Empire was made up Gazis, Turkish faith fighter ...
    Related: byzantine empire, empire, ottoman, ottoman empire, saudi arabia
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