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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: nisei

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  • Angelo Rebelo - 554 words
    Angelo Rebelo James Dulong AP History Per 6 On December 7, 1941 the Japanese launched a sneak attack on Pearl Habor. This attack on the United States Pacific Fleet was a total tactical success. The Japanese, using 360 planes and midgit submarines, were able to sink the USS Arizona, USS California, USS Maryland, USS Oklahoma, USS Pesilvania, USS Tennessee, and the USS Utha. They also destroyed Hickman Feild, the US air base on Hawaii. The result of this attack was a declaration of war on Germany, Italy, and Japan by the United States. It also had an effect on the Japanese-Americans living on the West Coast. American citizens had property taken away and were encarrsirated by their fellow citiz ...
    Related: angelo, political science, combat units, declaration of war, coast
  • Japanese Americans - 1,724 words
    Japanese Americans The Japanese Americans have maintained loyalty to the United States throughout the history of there immigration beginning in 1843 (Leathers, 6). Over the years, they have persevered through the trials and tribulations of discrimination and prejudice. The white community often discriminated them because of the misunderstanding of their language and culture. They overcame this obstacle, and became productive citizens of the United States of America. The immigration of the Japanese into the United States was first recorded in 1843. Because of the strong currents and winds, sea traders and fishing fleets from many nations learned to exploit these winds and currents to travel f ...
    Related: american public, american society, american state, japanese, japanese american, japanese government, native americans
  • Japanese Immigrants And The Following Generations Had To Endure - 995 words
    Japanese immigrants and the following generations had to endure discrimination, racism, and prejudice from white Americans. They were first viewed as economic competition. The Japanese Americans were then forced into internment camps simply because of the whites fear and paranoia. The Japanese first began to immigrate to the United States in 1868. At first they came in small numbers. US Census records show only 55 in 1870 and 2,039 in 1890. After that, they came in much greater numbers, reaching 24,000 in 1900, 72,000 in 1910, and 111,000 in 1920.(Parrillo,287) Most settled in the western states.(Klimova,1) Many families in Japan followed the practice of primogeniture, which is when the elde ...
    Related: endure, japanese, japanese american, west coast, racial bias
  • Japanese Immigrants And The Following Generations Had To Endure - 1,005 words
    ... the states farm crop.(Klimova,3) Autin Anson of the Grower-Shipper Association of Salinas, California, made this statement while lobbying for the mass incarceration of Japanese Americans: "Were charged with wanting to get rid of the Japs for selfish reasons. We might as well be honest. We do. Its a question of whether the white man lives on the Pacific Coast or the brown men. They came into this valley to work, and they stayed to take over."(Spickard,97) This terribly racist statement explains on e conflict over the limited resources available. The dominant group wants the competition removed and deep the minority group with as little as possible. Lieutenant General John L. Dewitt, the h ...
    Related: endure, fifth generation, japanese, japanese american, limited resources
  • Japanese Immigration Parading With Pride - 557 words
    Japanese Immigration - Parading With Pride A 1949 parade was Los Angeles's first post-World War II event to celebrate Japanese-American culture. It honors the Nisei, second-generation Japanese-Americans, who descended from the Issei, the first generation of Japanese to come to America. Japanese immigration to America began in 1882 with the Meiji Restoration. The Meiji Restoration in Japan marked a time of Westernization and change. For the first time in two centuries, foreigners could enter Japan and Japanese citizens could leave. So, when America's Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 barred Chinese from providing America with cheap labor, the Japanese arrived to fill the void. Many rice farmers i ...
    Related: immigration, japanese, japanese american, pride, russo-japanese war
  • Korematsu V United States - 1,026 words
    Korematsu V United States U.S. Constitutional Survey Korematsu v. United States (1944) Korematsu v. United States (1944) actually began December 7, 1941 with the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. The attack on Pearl Harbor then began the conquering of Wake, Guam, Philippines, Malaya, Singapore, Dutch East Indies, New Guinea, Solomon Islands, and Burma. With the attack on Pearl Harbor, racism, which was hardly unfamiliar, became an even greater problem. The Japanese Government's attacks on Americans including; torturing, raping, and murdering was an excuse for Americans aversion towards the Japanese. Public officials began to lock up the Japanese people simply for their own good, for protectio ...
    Related: states supreme court, united states supreme, united states supreme court, west coast, constitutional rights
  • Racial Discrimination Against Nonwhites - 1,557 words
    Racial Discrimination Against Nonwhites During the time of War World II, many group of nonwhite race faced unfairness in the United States. Among all the minorities that were being discriminated against, the two most well known races were the African American and the Japanese American. They were treated unfairly due to their color and culture. Even though they are two totally distinct groups with different customs and backgrounds, they felt similar the way they were being treated. Both group were denied of their right as U.S. citizen. Despite the fact that many African Americans and Japanese Americans were born and raise in the United States, the U.S. government questioned their loyalty due ...
    Related: discrimination, racial, racial discrimination, racial inequality, human beings
  • Stranger From A Different Shore - 1,391 words
    Stranger From A Different Shore Struggling Strangers Strangers From A Different Shore by author/professor Ronald Takaki has brought a new perspective of my growing knowledge of the hardships and endless obstacles that Asian-Americans have struggled with through their immigration experience. Immigrants of Asia represent many countries and many different situations that have brought them to this better country with hopes for more opportunities to succeed. Asian-Americans are those whose roots are from Vietnam, Laos, Thailand, Philippines, Japan, China, Cambodia, Korea, and Hmong to name the most common. Asian-Americans have overcome drastic situations to carry the status that they do today. Cu ...
    Related: different situations, shore, stranger, ethnic studies, pacific rim
  • The Japanese American National Museum - 1,304 words
    The Japanese American National Museum The Japanese American National Museum The Japanese American National Museum is an organization that contributes to the Japanese American community in numerous ways. Since it is a museum, it offers historical information and many services to both the Japanese American and non-Japanese community about the role that Japanese played in American history. It is an active organization that interacts with the surrounding community, as well as with other organizations and programs worldwide and an organization that serves to the public with exhibits, programs, and publications that explore the changing role of Japanese Americans. However, the history and the pres ...
    Related: american, american community, american experience, american history, american national, japanese, japanese american
  • The Japanese American National Museum - 1,324 words
    ... espect and historical value of the Japanese American experiences. WHAT THE MUSEUM OFFERS The museum offers a plethora of artifacts, photos, quotes, poems, personal testimonies, pieces of art, and records to the public to create a deeper understanding about Japanese American history. In the Historic Building, there is a temporary photo display of The Heart Mountain Story, including over thirty images of Japanese Americans in the relocation camp. The photos were taken by Hansel Mieth and Otto Hagel. In 1943, they were sent to the Heart Mountain Relocation center in Northwest Wyoming to take pictures for Life magazine. The photos went unpublished and hidden until 1995. This display is a use ...
    Related: american, american experience, american historical, american history, american life, american national, american population
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