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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: new zealand

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  • New Zealand First Appeared About 140 Million Years Ago, During The Mesozoic Era This Landmass Gradually Eroded Until About 80 - 1,400 words
    New Zealand first appeared about 140 million years ago, during the Mesozoic Era. This landmass gradually eroded until about 80 million years ago, when sea floor spreading started and the Tasmanian sea formed. However, it wasn't until 10,000 years ago when the land formed the shape, as we now know it. The oldest rocks in New Zealand are approximately six-hundred and eighty million years old. These rocks were found on the west coast of the South Island. Although, at one point in its history, New Zealand was connected to Australia, it separated and did not share in the subsequent evolution of the marsupials associated with "down under." New Zealand's only indigenous mammals are two species of b ...
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  • Difficulties Based On Cultural Differences Marketers And Advertising Agents Have To Deal With - 1,775 words
    1. Topic The report is about the difficulties based on cultural differences marketers and advertising agents have to deal with when setting up an advertising campaign. 2. Introduction The research report will try to show what are the main problems marketers are confronted with when they set up an advertising campaign for the world markets. It is not the goal of the essay to find new approaches to avoid expensive mistakes connected with the wrong advertising campaign. It rather should show with examples where global companies have made mistakes in the past, what the consequences were and should show what companies do and did to avoid such embarrassing mistakes and maybe where the changes in a ...
    Related: advertising, advertising campaign, cross cultural, cultural identity, marketers, marketing & advertising
  • 1954 - 1,704 words
    1954 In the year 1954, the United States was changing rapidly. President Eisenhower, a Republican, was in the midst of his first term. Eisenhower had just announced to the world that the United States had in fact developed and successfully tested the first hydrogen bomb some two years prior. Mamie Eisenhower christened the Nautilus, which was the first submarine to run on nuclear power. The great court decision, Brown vs. the Board of Education, called for the integration of the countrys public schools. Arkansas and Alabama refused to integrate and President Eisenhower was forced to send the 101st Airborne Division to integrate the schools of these states. The phrase Under God was added to t ...
    Related: washington monument, new zealand, southeast asia, emotion, police
  • A Journey Though The Golden Gates Of Promise - 2,246 words
    A Journey Though the "Golden Gates" of Promise Great controversy exists over the true promises of the "Golden Gates" in the United States. Discrimination occurs with different ethnic groups, but for those immigrants permitted into the country, the opportunities are excellent. The laws and practices established to control immigration into the United States limit the amount of poverty that can be present in the country. Without these important practices and laws created by the United States Congress, "cheap" labor would overpower American citizen labor and lead the country to an economic and social catastrophe. Although the United States is often criticized for its establishment of immigration ...
    Related: golden, promise, north america, east africa, testimony
  • A Lesson From Oliver - 5,261 words
    ... had little wish to draw him into this conversation. I decided to change the subject quickly. "Coincidentally, yes sir. Why I'm calling, though, is to inquire about the number of outboard motors that have gone missing since last week." "Pardon me?" The tone of his voice took a sudden sinister turn that sent a twinge through my bladder. Like the rookie I was, I had made some as yet unrecognized blunder. I felt the strong urge to conclude the interview immediately, but it was too late. He knew my name. He knew my brother's name. He knew why I'd called. He knew everything. I'd have to bluff past my own ignorance. "Well, I was wondering if the police suspected some kind of theft ring being i ...
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  • Aids - 1,146 words
    AIDS Being one of the most fatal viruses in the nation, AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome) is now a serious public health concern in most major U.S. cities and in countries worldwide. Since 1986 there have been impressive advances in understanding of the AIDS virus, its mechanisms, and its routes of transmission. Even though researchers have put in countless hours, and millions of dollars it has not led to a drug that can cure infection with the virus or to a vaccine that can prevent it. With AIDS being the leading cause of death among adults, individuals are now taking more precautions with sexual intercourse, and medical facilities are screening blood more thoroughly. Even though HI ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, latin america, hepatitis b, pneumonia
  • Andrew Carnegie - 1,141 words
    Andrew Carnegie Andrew Carnegie Essay written by A man of Scotland, a distinguished citizen of the United States, and a philanthropist devoted to the betterment of the world around him, Andrew Carnegie became famous at the turn of the twentieth century and became a real life rags to riches story. Born in Dunfermline, Scotland, on November 25, 1835, Andrew Carnegie entered the world in poverty. The son of a hand weaver, Carnegie received his only formal education during the short time between his birth and his move to the United States. When steam machinery for weaving came into use, Carnegies father sold his looms and household goods, sailing to America with his wife and two sons. At this t ...
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  • Aromatherapy - 1,238 words
    Aromatherapy Aromatherapy Aromatherapy is a branch of herbal medicine that centers on using fragrant substances, particularly oily plant extracts, to alter mood or improve individuals health or appearance. The alleged benefits of aromatherapy range from stress relief to enhancement of immunity and the unlocking of emotions from past experiences. But skeptics cite a lack of credible supportive studies published in reputable scientific or medical journals. Scents of Well-Being? Aromatherapy is a buzzword used by the cosmetics, fragrance, and alternative-medicine industries. Although the method has ancient roots, proponents did not call it aromatherapy before the 1930s. This expression derives ...
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  • Australia - 1,086 words
    Australia Australia has changed hands a lot throughout its history. From being inhabited by the aborigines, which had been there for around forty thousand years, until the British claimed it. However the British were not the first to come across this continent, they were just the first countries to see it as useful. The Dutch were seeking new land and trade in the East Indies, and found that sailing along the coasts of Africa and India too much longer than if the went due east and the cut up. However, the Dutch Vessel, Duyfken, first sighted the coast of modern day Australia in 1606 when it did not turn north in time. In 1642-43 Able Tasman was looking for new land south of Batavia, and shif ...
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  • Australia - 1,946 words
    Australia Australia The name of Australia comes from the Latin word Australis, which means southern. Since it lies entirely in the southern hemisphere, Australia is most commonly referred to as "down under". Australia, being a country, is also a continent. In land area its the sixth largest for a country and the smallest continent. Australia is a very dry, thinly populated country. Very few coastal areas receive enough rainfall to support a large population. The largest group of Australian people live in two large cities, Sydney and Melbourne. The vast interior is mainly desert or grassland and there are very few settlements. As a whole, the country has a density of six people per square mil ...
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  • Australia And Apec - 1,202 words
    Australia And Apec Economics assignment: APEC When the Asian-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) was established in 1989 in response to the growing interdependence among Asia-Pacific economies, its goal was to advance Asia-Pacific economic dynamism and sense of community. When the cooperation was established, there were 12 founding member economies, namely Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Indonesia, Japan, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Republic of the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and the United States. Since then there has been more countries/economies joining APEC. APEC has come a long way since 1989. It has built steadily on the efforts of the past and looks forward to ...
    Related: apec, australia, national product, economic growth, taipei
  • Australian Immigration Law - 1,059 words
    Australian - Immigration Law Australia is similar to America in many ways. They are both industrialized nations, they were both settled by the British, and they both have multi-ethnic societies. However, the two countries have vastly different immigration laws. In America, we will let almost anyone move here and work. An American immigrant can be from (almost) any country, race, or religion. Australia on the other hand, has had a much stricter policy determining who can move to their country. Australia's immigration law is ethnocentric in nature because it excludes anyone who is not of Anglo-Saxon descent. The policy is in the best interest for the British settlers, rather than in the best i ...
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  • Begun As A War Between South Korea Republic Of Korea And North Korea Democratic Peoples Republic Of Korea, After The Norths I - 1,625 words
    Begun as a war between South Korea (Republic of Korea) and North Korea (Democratic People's Republic of Korea), after the North's invasion of the South, the conflict swiftly developed into a limited international war involving the U.S. and 19 other nations. From a general viewpoint, the Korean War was one of the by-products of the cold war, the global political and diplomatic struggle between the Communist and non-Communist systems following World War II. The motives behind North Korea's decision to attack South Korea, however, had as much to do with internal Korean politics north and south of the 38th parallel (the boundary between the two republics) as with the cold war. Contrary to the pr ...
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  • Book Review: Darkness, Be My Friend - 644 words
    Book Review: Darkness, Be My Friend Darkness, Be My Friend is the fourth book in John Marsden's series consisting of Tomorrow, When the War Began, In the Dead of the Night and The Third Day, The Frost, in which seven young people are thrown into the middle of a violent war zone. Ellie, Fi, Kevin, Lee, Homer, Robyn and Corrie set out on a camping trip to a remote part of their district. They find their way into a remote basin surrounded by dangerous cliffs and difficult terrain, where they are completely safe and cut off from the rest of the world. When the teenagers return to their homes, they find that all the families in the district were abducted and locked into the show grounds by armed ...
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  • Bovine Tmb - 1,501 words
    Bovine TMB Bovine Tuberculosis Mycobacterium bovis (Bovine Tuberculosis) (or cattle Tuberculosis) was first discovered by Columella (Louis Junius Moderatus Columella) which was born in Cadiz, Spain and resided in Northern Italy when he discovered the bovine Tuberculosis in the year 14 A D. In 1882 Robert Koch discovered that the connection between human and animal Tuberculosis actually were established. When Koch realized that children were becoming infected from contaminated cows milk most nations brought out legal instruments designed to remove chronically infected animals and take a look at the public health aspect of the problem. The Disease Mycobacterium bovis is the bacterium that caus ...
    Related: bovine, control programs, new zealand, most effective, confirmation
  • Buyer Behaviour - 3,170 words
    Buyer Behaviour 1.0 Introduction The purpose of this report is to analyse and evaluate the decision-making process consumers go through when purchasing health supplements and formal clothing. The objective is to compare the differences between the two processes and identify the implications each has on marketing strategy. This has been achieved through both secondary and primary research. The secondary analysis involved research using the textbooks and articles on health supplements and formal clothing and the application of relevant consumer behaviour concepts and theories. This report will also thoroughly discuss, compare and report on the typical decision making processes likely to be fol ...
    Related: behaviour, buyer, consumer behaviour, target market, reference groups
  • Canadian Business - 827 words
    Canadian Business Canada has been transformed in recent years into an information based society. Nearly half of the labour force in Canada works in occupations involving the collection and processing of information. In a society in which information has become a commodity, communications provide a vital link that can mean the difference between success or failure. Telecommunications is a fundamental infrastructure of the Canadian economy and society. For these reasons, an efficient and dynamic telecommunications industry is necessary to ensure economic prosperity. Deregulating the Long Distance Industry is the only sure way to ensure that prosperity. Telecommunications in Canada, which inclu ...
    Related: canadian, canadian economy, canadian parliament, regulatory framework, growing demand
  • Cancer In Detail - 1,070 words
    Cancer In Detail Discuss social, ethical and biological issues associated with cancer Cancer is one of the most complex and devastating diseases that claim the life of many humans. Today there are one in three people worldwide who are affected by cancer, and almost 60% of these people will almost certainly die. 7000 New Zealanders die every year from this disease. It is the second largest killer next to heart disease. Cancer does not just affect certain groups of people, it can affect anybody and it is not just one disease, it refers to more than a hundred diseases. Cancer is caused by carcinogens. At present, hundreds of chemicals are known to induce cancer. Normally, the bodys cells divide ...
    Related: breast cancer, cancer, colon cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer
  • Charles Darwin - 1,851 words
    Charles Darwin Charles Robert Darwin was a man of many hats. He was a friend, colleague, son, father, husband; but above all, he was a naturalist. Through his dedication and perseverance did he manage to, in less than a generation, establish the theory of evolution as a fact in peoples' minds. In fact, [t]oday it is almost impossible for us to return, even momentarily, to the pre-Darwinian atmosphere and attitude (West 323). Darwin formed the basis of his theory during the voyage of the H.M.S. Beagle, on which vessel he was posted as it travelled around the globe. During that five-year span, this young man saw foliage, creatures, cultures that he had never known first-hand before. He was exp ...
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  • Charles Darwin - 372 words
    Charles Darwin Darwin was born in Shrewsbury, Shropshire. He was the son of Robert Waring Darwin and his wife Susannah; and the grandson of the scientist Erasmus Darwin, and of the potter Josiah Wedgwood. His mother died when he was eight years old, and he was brought up by his sister. He was taught classics at Shrewsbury, then sent to Edinburgh to study medicine, which he hated, and a final attempt at educating him was made by sending him to Christ's College, Cambridge, to study theology (1827). During that period he loved to collect plants, insects, and geological specimens, guided by his cousin William Darwin Fox, an entomologist. His scientific inclinations were encouraged by his botany ...
    Related: charles darwin, charles lyell, darwin, erasmus darwin, coral reefs
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