Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: new guinea

  • 42 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • Alligators And Crocodiles - 564 words
    Alligators And Crocodiles Leigh Williams Alligators and Crocodiles Crocodiles and alligators are two reptiles that are often mistaken for each other. One of the most common questions alligator and crocodile researchers face today is what the differences are between the two. Although these reptiles favor in physical features, there are numerous differences. The first three differences between the alligator and crocodile are not in physical appearance. These differences are in their subfamilies, number of species, and the origination of their names. Although the alligator and crocodile are both reptiles, the alligator belongs to the alligatorinae subfamily and the crocodile to the crocodylinae ...
    Related: alligators, southeast asia, new guinea, animal science, fifteen
  • Amelia Earhart - 1,195 words
    Amelia Earhart Amelia Mary Earhart was born on July 24, 1897 in Atchison, Kansas. She was the daughter of a railroad attorney and had a younger sister named Muriel. Amelia was a tomboy and was always interested in learning. She was educated at Columbia University and Harvard Summer School. She taught English to immigrant factory workers. During World War I, Amelia was a volunteer in a Red Cross hospital. Amelia heard of a woman pilot, Neta Snook, who gave flying lessons. She had her first lesson on January 2, 1921. On July 24, 1921, Amelia bought her first plane, a prototype of the Kinner airplane and named it "The Canary." In 1928, she accepted the invitation of the American pilots Wilmer S ...
    Related: amelia, amelia earhart, earhart, los angeles, physical evidence
  • Antibiotic Resistance In Bacteria - 724 words
    Antibiotic Resistance In Bacteria For about 50 years, antibiotics have been the answer to many bacterial infections. Antibiotics are chemical substances that are secreted by living things. Doctors prescribed these medicines to cure many diseases. During World War II, it treated one of the biggest killers during wartime - infected wounds. It was the beginning of the antibiotic era. But just when antibiotics were being mass produced, bacteria started to evolve and became resistant to these medicines. Antibiotic resistance can be the result of different things. One cause of resistance could be drug abuse. There are people who believe that when they get sick, antibiotics are the answer. The more ...
    Related: antibiotic, antibiotic resistance, bacteria, resistance, papua new guinea
  • Asia - 290 words
    Asia Asia Asia is the largest of all the continents and includes within its limits an area of 17,159,995 sq mi, or about 33% of the world's total land surface and the greater part of the Eurasian land mass. The border between Europe is traditionally drawn as an imaginary zigzag line passing down the spine of the Ural Mountains and through the Caspian Sea, Caucasus Mountains, and Black Sea. The boundary dividing Asia and Africa is generally placed along the Suez Canal, and the boundary between Asia and Australasia is usually placed between the island of New Guinea and Australia. Asia is by far the most populous of all the continents, with an estimated population in 1992 of 3,275,200,000, or m ...
    Related: asia, east asia, south asia, southeast asia, southwest asia
  • Australia And War - 947 words
    Australia And War Should Australia involve itself in wars which do not directly affect its security? Australia has involved itself in four wars where it has suffered substantial life loss and casualty. Those wars included World War 1, World War 2, the Korean War and Vietnam. Did Australia have to involve itself in these wars? Did the lives of these young Australians have to be taken? There is a high degree of complexity in this question. Should Australia, as a mature nation, be taking part in moral issues around the world even though they are not happening on our doorstep? Do we ignore the deaths in Bosnia, the starving millions in Biafra and Ethiopia, the worldwide environmental issues rais ...
    Related: australia, world war 1, environmental issues, gulf war, british
  • Australian Aborigines - 1,383 words
    Australian Aborigines Until this paper, I never even knew there was such a word as "Aborigine" let alone it being a race of people dating back to the prehistoric times. I thought that all Australians were of Anglo decent, but I was wrong about that assumption. The Aborigines were the first and only inhabitants of Australia, until the late 18th century when European settlers came. Because of the Europeans, the Aborigines lives would change drastically. In this paper, I am going to talk about the Aborigines, describing their origins up to the present. The Aborigines came originally from somewhere in Asia and have been in Australia for at least 40,000 years. The first settlement occurred during ...
    Related: aborigines, australian, australian aborigines, living conditions, daily life
  • Australian Foreign Policy - 206 words
    Australian Foreign Policy Australian Foreign Policy Topic 2 Due Date: 26/5 Teacher: Br Smith Student: Luke OConnor Australia was a good friend to the Indonesian independence movement in the years after World War 2, but Australia stood silently by as Dutch New Guinea was given to Indonesia. Again, Australia stood on the sidelines when Indonesian soldiers killed Australian journalists in Balibo, invaded East Timor and annexed the territory in 1975. [Review, November, 1995] Australias indecisiveness in matters of foreign policy has significantly affected the make up of the regions political structures. Bipartisan political inactivity in Australia, prevalent during the quiet time 1955-1965 compo ...
    Related: australian, foreign policy, self determination, east timor, dutch
  • Body Language: Cultural Or Universal - 1,197 words
    Body Language: Cultural Or Universal? Body language and various other nonverbal cues have long been recognized as being of great importance to the facilitation of communication. There has been a long running debate as to whether body language signals and their meanings are culturally determined or whether such cues are innate and thus universal. The nature versus nurture dichotomy inherent in this debate is false; one does not preclude the other's influence. Rather researcher's should seek to address the question how much of nonverbal communication is innate and how much is culturally defined? Are there any true universal nonverbal cues or just universal tendencies modified to suit cultural ...
    Related: body language, cross cultural, different cultures, new guinea, inherent
  • Double Standard Of Masculinity In Gender Role Socialization - 1,060 words
    ... t to an extreme. He talks of the initiation rites of the Sambia of New Guinea saying, Initiation rites begin when boys are seven to ten years old and include oral ingestion of older boys' semen and painful bleeding by sticking grass reeds up the nose. The bleeding is a counterpart of menstruation and semen is ingested instead of mother's milk (Betcher 1993). Although these actions seek to mark the boy as not a woman, ironically they incorporate basic feminine biologic functions that men lack. Secondary socialization then acts in the later stages of a boy's life to reaffirm society's beliefs about masculinity. As boys grow older, their bodies develop and they enter junior high and high sc ...
    Related: double, double standard, gender, masculinity, socialization
  • Federation - 493 words
    Federation The move to federation was not an easy one; there was lots of debating and disagreement, as Alfred Deakin wrote in 1900 its accomplishment must always appear to have been secured by a series of miracles. It was not until the late 1880s that a movement towards federation really started to gather strength. Before this the colonies held the believe that federation would do little for them, they were too busy in there own local problems. However a sense of nationalism was growing and Australia was primarily an Anglo Saxon, English speaking country and Australians were determined to keep it that way. By the 1880s 70% of Australian people were native born, these Australians regarded Au ...
    Related: federation, south wales, english speaking, prime minister, compulsory
  • Frock Rock - 508 words
    Frock Rock FROCK ROCK is a Melbourne-based jazz ensemble focusing on original compositions and improvisation. The group promotes a high standard of performance and professionalism gained through the years of experience and learning of its individual members. All of its members have studied music and improvisation at the prestigious Victorian College of the Arts (VCA). Two of the members in FROCK have returned to lecture there, while the remaining members are educators at tertiary and secondary school level around the state of Victoria. The VCA brings together the finest musicians in Australia, both as teachers and students, and is representitive of the ethnic culture in Australia. It is from ...
    Related: rock, american jazz, secondary school, new guinea, victoria
  • Geography Of Indonesia And Australia - 1,091 words
    Geography of Indonesia and Australia Geography of Indonesia and Australia Indonesia and Australia are nations located southeast of Asia, separated by the Timor Sea and the Java Trench. Both have undergone challenges in economy, government, and demography that are both similar and quite different from the other. Indonesia is"the worlds most expansive archipelagic (fragmented) state" (Blij 503) with multiple heritages and cultures. Australia has been slowly declining over the past century and continues to economically disintegrate. According to records kept on the economy, government, and demography, both Australia and Indonesia are continuing to be recognized as similar and distinct in their ...
    Related: australia, geography, indonesia, east coast, natural resources
  • Great Swiss Mountain Dog - 376 words
    Great Swiss Mountain Dog Dogs I. The Great Swiss Mountain Dog A breed descended from the great Molloser that accompanied Hannibal across the Alps when he invaded Rome. Swissys were used by Swiss farmers to haul carts to market and as drivers to drive their cattle. Many Swissys still retain these working abilities today. The breed was used as late as World War II as pack dogs by the Swiss Army The breed was almost extinct around the turn of the century and numbers have been slowly increasing. Swissys are in great demand as pets because of their stable temperaments. I. The New Guinea Singing Dog Is a natural breed of wild origin. The over all impression is that of an extremely agile and gracef ...
    Related: mountain, swiss, world war ii, animal science, characteristic
  • Guns, Germs And Steel - 1,033 words
    Guns, Germs And Steel Book Review on Jared Diamonds Guns, Germs and Steel Why is it that Europeans ended up conquering so much of the world? Or as Yali puts it in the far beginning of the book, Why is it that you white people developed so much cargo and brought it to New Guinea, but we black people had little cargo of our own? Despite all the contrary evidence from anthropology and human biology, many persist in attributing the differing political and economic successes of the worlds peoples to historical contingency. On the other hand though, the author sees the fundamental causes as environmental, resting ultimately on ecological differences between the continents and as he well puts it on ...
    Related: steel, fertile crescent, new guinea, book review, fertile
  • Hawaii By James Michener - 2,131 words
    ... ey to the New Orleans, Colorado, and Nebraska sugar tycoons. Pretty soon they would all be bankrupt. The McKinley Tariff protected the United States sugar producers by penalizing those who imported Hawaiian sugar, and subsidized those who sold American sugar. So Whip and the eight others devised a plan to begin a revolution, seize control of the government, and turn the islands over to the United States. Queen Liliuokalani was the new queen, succeeding her brother after he died. She wished that the non-Hawaiian enterprises would leave; this included Whip and his companions. The coalition planned to begin a revolution, with the help of their friend and relative Micah Hale - a minister. Th ...
    Related: hawaii, point of view, armed forces, social class, sank
  • Humans And Fauna In Australia - 1,503 words
    ... 1994). This drop in sea level resulted in much of the Australian continental shelf becoming dry land. This made it possible to walk between Australia and New Guinea, and between Victoria and Tasmania. Flood, (1995), describes how there was probably only a 90 km gap of open ocean between Australia and Asia when the sea level was low. It is thought that this enabled the first Australian's to 'island hop' their way through Asia to the north-west of Western Australia. Regardless of the actual colonisation date, it is believed that Aboriginal people occupied most of Australia by 35,000 (at least all favourable environments) (Flood, 1995). Therefore, Aboriginal people would have of the environ ...
    Related: australia, fauna, flora and fauna, galapagos islands, world wide
  • Hunters Gatherers - 306 words
    Hunters & Gatherers Anthropology 1010: Assignment 1 The Asmat, Headhunters, people are located in New Guinea's West Iran. These people actually cut off people heads and eat their brains and wear their jaws as a necklace. People's brains are not their main source of food. The major food of these people is the starch of the sago palm that they roast. The sago palm is found deep into the swamps. You take an ax and split the palm in to two pieces. The food inside is called sago grub. The sago grub is soft white larva of the Capricorn beetle. They put it on a stick and roast it in the fire. The Asmat villages are always located by water and the houses are raised on poles above the mud. When high ...
    Related: gatherers, new guinea, national geographic, iran, capricorn
  • Indonesia - 642 words
    Indonesia Indonesia This report will be on the History in Brief of Indonesia, the Government of Indonesia, the island of Java, and the Geography of Indonesia. In early days, the region from India to Japan, including Indonesia, was known to the Europeans as the Indies. Chris Columbus was looking for a westward sea root from Europe to the Indies, when he arrived in America. During 1600s the Dutch political control began to spread Indonesia. Indonesia declared it's independence in 1945 and fought the Dutch until 1949, when they gave up their control. At first, the Dutch allowed nationalist movement to develop. In 1905, it had introduced councils to govern the towns and cities. By 1920, there we ...
    Related: indonesia, indian ocean, southeast asian, central government, greenland
  • Jungle And The Rain Forest - 786 words
    Jungle and The Rain Forest Jungle and rain forest are terms that are often used synonymously but with little precision. The more meaningful and restrictive of these terms is rain forest, which refers to the climax or primary forest in regions with high rainfall (greater than 1.8 m/70 in per year), chiefly but not exclusively found in the tropics. Rain forests are significant for their valuable timber resources, and in the tropics they afford sites for commercial crops such as rubber, tea, coffee, bananas, and sugarcane. They also include some of the last remaining areas of the Earth that are both unexploited economically and inadequately known scientifically. The term jungle originally refer ...
    Related: forest, jungle, rain, rain forest, tropical forest, tropical rain forest
  • Keeping The Rabble In Line - 3,544 words
    Keeping The Rabble In Line Keeping the Rabble in Line Copyright 1994 by Noam Chomsky and David Barsamian Introduction | Next section | Contents | Archive | ZNet The World Bank, GATT and Free Trade April 20, 1992 DB: In 1944 at the Bretton Woods conference in New Hampshire the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) were both created. What function do these two major financial entities play? Their early role was in helping to carry through the reconstruction of the state capitalist industrial societies that had been wrecked by the Second World War. After that they shifted to what is called development, which is often a form of controlled underdevelopment in the Third World, whic ...
    Related: good idea, canadian health, property rights, involve, disastrous
  • 42 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3