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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: new england

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  • Dbq On Comparing Chesapeake And New England Bay Colonies - 1,325 words
    Dbq On Comparing Chesapeake And New England Bay Colonies #1 DBQ Curiosity and bravery led the English to discover the nations of America. These strong willed Europeans, determined to find to a new world, set out with high hopes and ambitions. Settling a variety of colonies along the coast of North America, the English were among the first true pioneers. After several expeditions and ships loads of emigrants, the English had a divergence of reasons for departing Europe for America. The settlers of the Chesapeake and New England colonies, were foreigners to the land, established two exceptional but contrary societies due to the diversity of English citizens. Chesapeake and New England colonies ...
    Related: chesapeake, chesapeake bay, chesapeake colonies, church of england, comparing, england colonies, new england
  • Europeans In Pursuit Of Capitalism In New England - 681 words
    Europeans In Pursuit Of Capitalism In New England Europeans in Pursuit of Capitalism in New England Indian and European people had many cultural differences causing both cultures to clash. The two cultures also had different beliefs in terms of land usage and commodities. The European arrival had an enormous impact on the ecosystem, which as well affected the lives of the Indians. The Indians were used to being mobile in terms of their way of living as opposed to the European colonists, they were used to settling in one place and were also very materialistic. On the other hand, the Indians only possessed what they needed and did not have luxuries like the colonists. The Indians of New Englan ...
    Related: capitalism, europeans, new england, pursuit, ozone layer
  • How The New England Colonist Altered The Enviornment - 1,356 words
    How The New England Colonist Altered The Enviornment How the New England Colonists` Altered the New England Environment In Changes in the Land, William Cronon points out the European colonists` pursuits of a capitalistic market and the impact it had on the New England ecosystem. Native Americans and colonists had different views on the use of land resources. The Natives viewed the land as something not owned, but as a resource to sustain life. They believe in a hunting-gathering system, hunting only when necessary. In the long run Native Americans lost their old traditions and were forced to adapt to the colonists` traditions in order to survive. This change contributed even more to the alte ...
    Related: enviornment, new england, indian population, native americans, cows
  • In A New England Nun, Mary E Wilkins Freeman Depicts The Life Of The Classic New England Spinster The Image Of A Spinster Is - 1,718 words
    In "A New England Nun", Mary E. Wilkins Freeman depicts the life of the classic New England spinster. The image of a spinster is of an old maid; a woman never married waiting for a man. The woman waiting to be married is restricted in her life. She does chores and receives education to make her more desirable as a wife. This leads to the allegories used in this short story. The protagonist life paralleled both of her pets' lives, her dog Caesar's and that of her little yellow canary. Both comparisons are of restriction and fear of freedom. The animals and the woman of this story are irreversible tamed by their captivity, and no longer crave freedom. Ideas of sin guilt and atonement are also ...
    Related: classic, domestic life, freeman, married life, mary, new england, wilkins
  • New England Vs Chesapeake - 1,014 words
    New England Vs. Chesapeake Early English colonies in America hardly resembled the union of men and women that would later fight against England and build a new country. In fact, until the mid-eighteenth century, most English colonists had very little, if anything to do with the settlers in neighboring colonies. They heard news of Indian wars and other noteworthy events, not from the colony itself, but from England. The colonies in the New World appeared completely different and the prospect of any unity between them seemed impossible. The colonies in New England and the Chesapeake exemplify the many differences in the culture and lifestyles of the settlers, created mainly because of the fact ...
    Related: chesapeake, chesapeake colonies, england colonies, new england, eighteenth century
  • The New England, Southern And Middle Colonies Developed Differently - 614 words
    The New England, Southern and Middle Colonies Developed Differently The New England, Southern and Middle Colonies Developed Differently America was a place for dreams and new beginnings, until "white" people arrived in 1607. Three groups sailed over the treacherous Atlantic from their cruel lives in England to set up peaceful religious colonies. The only problem is that they attempted to settle in their own way and all failed dismally. The New England, Middle and Southern Colonies grew differently over the period 1619-1760.Examining the three sets of colonies will prove that they were all different: socially, economically, politically but not philosophically. Socially the three groups of col ...
    Related: differently, england colonies, middle class, middle colonies, southern colonies
  • A Cultural Approach - 964 words
    A Cultural Approach The cultural and developmental aspects of American history in the 17th and 18th centuries are certainly among the most important and influential factors in the shaping of this country's long and storied history. Historiographically speaking, there are undoubtedly thousands upon thousands of different studies and opinions on the most influential cultural strides of early Americans well as the pros and cons that each colonial region developed in shaping America and readying it for the Revolutionary Era. Each of these four studies brings a slightly different and even, at times, conflicting approach to analyzing the cultural and social roots of early America, but each one pro ...
    Related: colonial period, urban areas, middle america, dynamic, portion
  • A Loyalist And His Life - 1,490 words
    A Loyalist And His Life The called me M.J., that stood for Michael Jones. It was the early part of April in 1760 when I departed an English port and headed across the waters for the North American colonies where I planned to settle, start a family, and begin what I hoped to be a very prosperous life. It was the summer if 1760 when I planted my feet and my heart in Boston along with several black slaves that I purchased when I arrived here. I brought a hefty 10,000 British pounds in my purse, which was my entire life savings. I was twenty-two years old, turning twenty-three in the fall. I had heard so many wonderful things about this place and I could not wait to get here. When I first arrive ...
    Related: common sense, north american, american colonies, atlantic, personally
  • A More Perfect Union: - 1,031 words
    A More Perfect Union: The Articles of Confederation The determined Madison had for several years insatiably studied history and political theory searching for a solution to the political and economic dilemmas he saw plaguing America. The Virginian's labors convinced him of the futility and weakness of confederacies of independent states. America's own government under the Articles of Confederation, Madison was convinced, had to be replaced. In force since 1781, established as a league of friendship and a constitution for the 13 sovereign and independent states after the Revolution, the articles seemed to Madison woefully inadequate. With the states retaining considerable power, the central g ...
    Related: more perfect union, circuit court, political machine, political theory, convention
  • A More Perfect Union: - 1,022 words
    ... e power to regulate trade, the southern states would be nothing more than overseers for the Northern States. On August 21 the debate over the issue of commerce became very closely linked to another explosive issue--slavery. When Martin of Maryland proposed a tax on slave importation, the convention was thrust into a strident discussion of the institution of slavery and its moral and economic relationship to the new government. Rutledge of South Carolina, asserting that slavery had nothing at all to do with morality, declared, Interest alone is the governing principle with nations. Sherman of Connecticut was for dropping the tender issue altogether before it jeopardized the convention. Ma ...
    Related: more perfect union, articles of confederation, bill of rights, northern states, mason
  • A Separate Peace: Chapter 1 - 5,662 words
    ... truth, the shadowy, elusive truth of an instant that is already beginning to fade in memory. Gene is about to make a full confession--or he thinks he is--when Dr. Stanpole and the nurse arrive. The following day Finny is sent home to recuperate. The summer session comes to an end, appropriately enough for Gene, for until now summer had represented freedom, sports, and running outdoors, with Finny as the light and life of it all. Now all that has changed. A month later, after a sojourn at home, Gene heads back to school for his senior year. On the way he makes a detour to call on Finny. NOTE: The "surprise" reunion is no surprise to Finny, who appears to have been waiting anxiously in hop ...
    Related: separate peace, ultimate punishment, last time, self awareness, burning
  • A Seperate Piece - 448 words
    A Seperate Piece A Separate Peace by John Knowls Is a classic struggle of man vs. himself and man vs. society. Taking place as a flashback, the narrator Gene Forrester tells of his struggles as a prep school student in the years of his life between age 16, and 17 during the period of WWII. Although Gene Forester the narrator and Finny an athletic roommate are best friends, they have to contrasting struggles. Like the garden of Eden the first few chapters express the peacefulness of the summer at the Private school in New England and the land beneath the forbidden tree. Like the Book Billy Budd by Herman Melville, A Separate Peace identifies some of the characters as innocent to the world. Ge ...
    Related: seperate, separate peace, billy budd, book reports, involving
  • A Triumphent Withdrawal - 1,409 words
    A Triumphent Withdrawal A Triumphent Withdrawal I have been one acquainted with the night. I have walked out in rain-and back in rain. I have outwalked the furthest city light. Acquainted with the night, by Robert Frost Anthology of American Literature (1010) Edward A. Robinson was the first most important poet of the Twentieth Century. He is a peoples poet his poems' characters often provide physiological portraits of fictional and historical characters suffering an isolation of some sort (990). Robinson is considered a transitional figure; he is the precursor of Modernist poetry. He uses the older traditional influences of form and rhyme and his poems are often simple and neat. However, in ...
    Related: withdrawal, best friend, robert frost, human experience, depth
  • Aaron Feuerstein - 1,889 words
    Aaron Feuerstein In this paper I will discuss Aaron Feuerstein, the third-generation president and CEO of Malden Mills Industries, Inc., who leads the Lawrence, Massachusetts business with his father's and grandfather's values: kindness, justice and charity. He does this through his charismatic leadership and vision, which binds his employees together into realizing and achieving the same goal. I will show exactly what makes him a leader in the modern business setting and explain why a leader's vision is important in defining a true innovator, effective manager and charismatic leader. Feuerstein and Malden Mills had a history of taking care of its employees. Workers' salaries average $12.50 ...
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  • Abortion - 2,032 words
    Abortion Abortion in today's society has become very political. You are either pro-choice or pro-life, and there doesn't seem to be a happy medium. As we look at abortion and research its history, should it remain legal in the United States, or should it be outlawed to reduce the ever growing rate of abortion. A choice should continue to exist but the emphasis needs to be placed on education of the parties involved. James C. Mohr takes a good look at abortion in his book Abortion in America. He takes us back in history to the 1800s so we can understand how the practice and legalization of abortion has changed over the year. In the absence of any legislation whatsoever on the subject of abort ...
    Related: abortion, induced abortion, court cases, civil war, affluent
  • Acid Rain - 1,013 words
    Acid Rain Acid Rain (The Environmental Effects) My first question is , What is Acid Rain? You hear about it all the time in the news and it is very important to the earths ecosystem. In simple terms, acid rain is rain that is more acidic than normal. All objects in nature have a certain level of acicicity but acid rain has too much acid in it. Acid rain is a complicated problem, caused by air pollution. Acid rain's spread and damage involves weather, chemistry, soil, and the life cycles of plants and animals on the land and from acid rain in the water. Acidity is measured using a pH scale, with the number 7 being neutral. Therefore, a body with a pH value of less than 7 is acidic. On the oth ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, rain, air pollution, new england
  • Aids And Std Education - 1,602 words
    ... Sexually Transmitted Diseases Sexually transmitted diseases are a major health concern for our country. With the spread of AIDS among so many people, both gay and heterosexual, it is important that we understand how these diseases spread and what we can do to prevent them. During the 1980s, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the cause of AIDS, emerged as a leading cause of death in the United.States). In 1993, HIV infection became the most common cause of death among persons aged 25-44 years.(Center for Disease Control) Studies have shown a need for educational interventions and future in-depth studies of college students. An example is a study which showed that a group of ...
    Related: aids, aids hiv, education program, further education, brief description
  • Aids Conspricay Is Aids Biological Warfare - 3,107 words
    Aids Conspricay - Is AIDS Biological Warfare? Refinance now homeowner even if you have bad credit. 185 loc Aids Conspricay - Is AIDS Biological Warfare? The following is a complete verbatim transcription from a recent broadcast of "Network 23", a program shown on a local Los Angeles Public Access Cable Channel. Good evening, I'm Michel Kassett. This is Network 23. A couple of weeks ago we had a program on the subject of AIDS, addressing the question of whether AIDS-the AIDS virus-was created by the government; and I'm sure that some people were quite shocked by what they heard. We spent that entire program relating to you the evidence of a very substantial amount of factual evidence which su ...
    Related: aids, aids research, biological, biological warfare, warfare
  • Aids In The Media - 887 words
    Aids In The Media It was only nineteen years ago when the world was first introduced to the AIDS virus, but by 1983 a significant number of people had died from the dreaded disease and media coverage began. AIDS was almost immediately viewed as one of the most stimulating scientific puzzles of the century. On June 5, 1981, the Federal Centers of Disease Control reported five cases of a rare pneumonia among gay men. It is the manner in which this epidemic has been reported that is my main focus. " In the case of AIDS, the popular media, especially the news media, have played an extremely important role in drawing upon pre-established knowledge and belief systems to create this new disease as ...
    Related: aids, mainstream media, mass media, media, media coverage, news & media, popular media
  • Alcohol Related Deaths - 1,125 words
    Alcohol Related Deaths More than 100,000 deaths per year are attributed to alcohol, in the United States. Alcohol-related auto accidents account for approximately 24,000 of these deaths (most often the victims are under 30 years of age), while alcohol-related homicide account for 11,000 and suicide 8,000 deaths. Certain types of cancer, which are partly associated with the consumption of alcohol, contribute to another 17,000 deaths. Alcohol-related strokes are responsible for 9,000 deaths. 25,000 lost lives are due to 12 alcohol-related diseases including cirrhosis of the liver. All these deaths combined are the equivalent of 200 jumbo jetliners crashing and taking the lives of everyone onbo ...
    Related: alcohol, american journal, vitamin c, nobel prize, liver
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