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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: neuron

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  • Alzheimers Disease - 1,539 words
    Alzheimer`s Disease Alzheimers Disease is a progressive, degenerative disease that affects the brain. Individuals with AD experience a progressive and specific loss of cognitive function resulting from the differentiation of the limbic system, association neocortex, and basal forebrain. It is also accompanied by the deposition of amyloid in plaques and cerebrovasculature, and the formation of neurofibrillary tangles in neurons. Alois Alzheimer, a German doctor, diagnosed this disease for the first time in 1907. At that time it was considered a rare disorder. Currently, this tragic brain disorder affects approximately four million people; It is the most common type of dementia and the fourth ...
    Related: alois alzheimer, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, physiological processes, limbic system
  • Black Holes - 1,163 words
    Black Holes Peters 1 Ron Peters Dr. James R. Pierce CP English 2 20 April 2000 Black Holes A Black hole is a theorized celestial body whose surface gravity is so strong that nothing, including light, can escape from within it's surface. Gravity is the key to a black hole's immense power. The black hole's strong gravity keeps captured material from escaping. For example, if Earth were the same mass it is now but had only one-fourth its present radius, the escape velocity of someone standing on its surface would be twice what it is now. Black holes have a power far greater than our minds can imagine. This report will go into further discussion on these massive holes in space. Now, though, astr ...
    Related: black hole, black holes, albert einstein, hubble space, traveling
  • Cell Communication - 1,237 words
    Cell Communication Physiology In the human body there are many parts that work together in order for everything to function properly, but even these parts need to have a way to know what to do. This is where cell communication comes into play. Tiny cells in the body contain astounding networks that allow for this communication. Scientists are discovering why these messages from cell to cell are so efficient, and this could lead to new therapies for diseases. In the past 15 years, scientists have discovered more of the code the cells use for their internal communications. Signal transmission begins when a messenger "docks" temporarily with a specific receptor on a recipient cell. This recepto ...
    Related: cell, communication system, human cells, building blocks, module
  • Chemistry Research - 2,013 words
    ... ng; use tissue rich in Mit/blood supply and Thermogenin. COLD vs HOT- Fig. 37.21 THERMAL INSULATION AND RATE OF HEAT LOSS = Thermal energy is release by body to it's environment = Muscle contraction or change blood flow to skin; WOLF-constrict Blood vessel in its feet at above 0 C = Elephant, Rhinos, water Buffaloes have thick layer of fur; so they wallow in water = Sweating, panting are last resort use bu animals in hot climate or habitat (H2O evaporate quickly) THE VERTEBRATE THERMOSTAT- Fig 37.22/37.23 = All animals that thermoregulate must have a regulatory system; Info get from Hypothalamus-integration center In Humans: If glands is cool BT rises (constriction of Blood vessels and i ...
    Related: chemistry, body weight, biological clock, genetic diversity, orange
  • Computer Intellect - 1,038 words
    Computer Intellect A new issue has come about since the building of computers. But the idea behind it is not such a new issue, for as long ago as Plato and Aristotle, the idea of a mind was pondered about. With the up-and-coming technology, the idea of artificial intelligence has exploded. It is one that many fiction writers have prospered on. But how far away are they from the truth? Take the story of The Bicentennial Man by Isaac Asimov, written in 1976, when most of the population didnt know what a computer was capable of. The idea of the unknown scared us, a robot that appeared to be just like us, but it was also intriguing, as demonstrated by the storys success. What was it that attract ...
    Related: intellect, organic chemistry, theory of evolution, isaac asimov, intelligence
  • Creativity: Beer Can Theory - 4,904 words
    Creativity: Beer Can Theory LEARNING MORE ABOUT THE KEY CONCEPTS Attribute listing The decision maker isolates the major characteristics of traditional alternatives. Each major attribute of the alternative is then considered in turn and is changed in every conceivable way. No ideas are rejected, no matter how ridiculous they may seem. Once this extensive list is completed the constraints of the problem are imposed in order to eliminate all but the viable alternatives. Creativity The ability to combine ideas in a unique way or to make unusual associations between ideas. Entrepreneurship The process of initiating a business venture, organizing the necessary resources, and assuming the associat ...
    Related: beer, human experience, ottawa citizen, bottom line, strictly
  • Creativity: Beer Can Theory - 4,998 words
    ... how discrete memories become woven into a worldview. Although this account focuses on integration of the worldview through the emergence of deeper, more general concepts, the principles apply equally to integration of the psyche through the purification of intentions and emotions. A detailed account of the proposal can be found in [Gabora 1998], and elaborations in [Gabora 1999, 2000], but the basic line of reasoning goes as follows. Much as catalysis increases the number of different polymers, which in turn increases the frequency of catalysis, reminding events increase concept density by triggering abstraction - the formation of abstract concepts or categories such as 'tree' or 'big' ...
    Related: beer, cognitive dissonance, love songs, information processing, consciousness
  • Dementiaa - 3,961 words
    ... re senile plaques (SP) and Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT). There are two types of SP, neuritic and diffuse, both plaques share antigenic determinants with the Beta amyloid 4 protein. Neuritic plaques can be distinguished by their abnormally thickened neurites ( i.e., axons or dendrites) arranged around a central core of amyloid (Mirra & Gearing, 1994). By contrast the diffuse plaques lack the thickened neurites and the amyloid core seen in the neuritic plaques (Mirra & Gearing, 1994). Plaques of both types are found in varying degrees in the neocortex, entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and in the amygdala. SP also occur in the brains of healthy people. It is only when they exceed a certain ...
    Related: cerebral cortex, nervous system, carbon dioxide, 1984, diagnosis
  • Diary Of Dispair - 1,387 words
    Diary Of Dispair A Diary of Despair A Chronicle of Heroin Abuse As Seen through the Eyes Of a Mother Jennifer Bernstein Drug Use and Abuse Professor Santucci 4/26/99 Dear Diary, I think back, and I smile at the little girl I used to have, all pigtails and lace. I can still hear her laughter echoing through the hallways of our home; see her swinging on the swing set in our backyard, her long curly blonde hair, full of pink ribbons, sailing behind her like a pool of melted gold. When the sun hit her face, she just glowed, her green eyes sparkling, her red cheeks, full, lush and alive. What happened to that little girl? Where the hell did I go wrong?!? Why am I sitting in a cold empty room, whe ...
    Related: dear diary, diary, teddy bear, common theme, yesterday
  • Divided Attention - 1,032 words
    ... lled. We memorize information so much more easily if we are able to see the whole picture and understand it to the extent that we are able to organize it. Organizing material makes learning easier because by understanding something it reduces the amount of information to be remembered. That is because we think of the elements of an idea as constituents in an interconnected whole. We then enter the package whole into memory rather than it's separate components. By integrating and unifying the information with past knowledge it reduces the effort needed to remember whatever information needs to be learned. With this knowledge at hand I have finally answered a question I have tormented my g ...
    Related: stress disorder, long-term memory, traumatic stress, network, biological
  • Dothiepin Vs Fluoxetine Mechanism Of Action And Pharmacodynamics - 1,290 words
    Dothiepin Vs. Fluoxetine (Mechanism Of Action And Pharmacodynamics) Comparison Between Mechanism of Action and Pharmacodynamics of Dothiepin and Fluoxetine Description of medicines Mechanism of action and pharmacodynamics Dothiepin Dothiepin is a tricyclic antidepressant. It acts by promoting the effectiveness of several amines (dopamine, norepinephrine, and 5-hydroxytryptamine, which is also known as 5HT and serotonin). It functions by inhibiting their reuptake at the terminals of nerve cells, thus leading to their prolonged presence at the synaptic cleft and an increased effect on the neuron.(1) The reuptake pumps for the above amines are responsible for reducing the concentration of these ...
    Related: mechanism, gastrointestinal tract, heart disease, new zealand, linear
  • Francis Crick - 999 words
    Francis Crick In 1953, Dr. Francis Crick and James Watson discovered the structure of the DNA molecule. This is the molecule which we now know stores the genetic information for all life. Many scientists have claimed the discovery to be the single most important development in biology during the 20th century. Watson and Crick's investigation into the nature of the genetic code and the passing of information from generation to generation has redefined the study of genetics. Also, it has basically created the science of molecular biology. For their outstanding work, James Watson and Dr. Francis Crick were awarded the 1962 Nobel Prize. As a youth, Francis Crick attended Northhampton Grammar Sch ...
    Related: crick, francis, francis crick, double helix, research council
  • Fusion - 1,323 words
    ... eating, and the onset of nuclear fusion. The situation in star formation differs in one respect: after gravitational collapse ceases and star begins to expand again due to heat from exoergic nuclear fusion reactions, the expansion is arrested by the gravity force associated with the enormous mass of the star. In a star a state of equilibrium in both size and temperature is achieved. In ICF, by contrast, complete disassembly of fuel occurs. The fusion reaction least difficult to achieve combines a deuteron (the nucleus of the deuterium atom) with a triton (the nucleus of a tritium atom). Both nuclei are isotopes of the hydrogen nucleus and contain a single unit of positive electric charge ...
    Related: fusion, nuclear fusion, high power, greenhouse effect, shock
  • Human Growth And Development - 1,207 words
    Human Growth And Development Human Growth and Development 1. abusive relationship: when one partner in a relationship becomes violent or aggressive toward the other. 2. accommodation: according to Piaget, changing existing knowledge based on new knowledge. 3. achievement status: identity status in which adolescents have explored alternative identities and are now secure in their chosen identities. 4. active euthanasia: deliberate ending of someones life. 5. activities of daily living (ADLs): self-care tasks such as eating, bathing, toileting, walking, or dressing. 6. activity: dimension of temperament defined by the tempo and vigor of a childs activity. 7. adaptation level: area where enviro ...
    Related: human growth, human values, life cycle, life sciences, amniocentesis
  • Human Growth And Development - 1,193 words
    ... tic, scrupulous, and persevering. 77. continuity theory: view that people tend to cope with daily life in late adulthood in essentially the same ways they coped in earlier periods of life. 78. continuity- discontinuity issue: issue concerned with whether a developmental phenomenon follows a smooth progression throughout the life span or a series of abrupt shifts. 79. conventional level: second level of reasoning in Kholbergs theory, where moral reasoning is based on societys norms. 80. convergent thinking: using information to arrive at one standard and correct answer. 81. cooing: early vowel-like sounds that babies produce. 82. cooperative play: play that is organized around a theme, wi ...
    Related: career development, human development, human growth, moral reasoning, point of view
  • Insects Have Sensors Forcesensitive Organs Concentrated In Areas Near Joints, Tips Of The - 366 words
    Insects have sensors (force-sensitive organs) concentrated in areas near joints, tips of the legs, and near exoskeletal sites attached to muscle tendons. These sensors act as strain gauges to detect compression of the exoskeleton. Using this information, insects recognize environments, regulate walking movements, and astonishingly "remember" stepping patterns and location. Through memory experiments, scientists see that a spider memorizes its own previous walking movements to backtrack to a fly. After presenting the fly to the spider on a petri dish, scientists chased the spider some distance away from the capture site. The spider then returns to the original spot, even though the fly has be ...
    Related: insects, tips, cuts, location
  • Logic And The Meaning Of Life - 1,059 words
    ... not specifically refer to life as we know it. The word life can be easily replaced by the word 'existence' to at least come closer to the connotations that have evolved around this phrase as a whole, but the word meaning has no obvious substitute. What is really meant by this phrase it seems to me is some kind of cosmic order. A way, perhaps, that things ought to be, a path that is favored by the universe? Examine some of the theories people have for existence that do not involve deities or creators. Examine the concept of karma, and imagine a universe where every being who was aware had a karma. To add the workings of karma to the universe really is not to give any meaning or order to o ...
    Related: logic, meaning of life, moral code, reward system, infinity
  • Logic And The Meaning Of Life - 1,059 words
    ... not specifically refer to life as we know it. The word life can be easily replaced by the word 'existence' to at least come closer to the connotations that have evolved around this phrase as a whole, but the word meaning has no obvious substitute. What is really meant by this phrase it seems to me is some kind of cosmic order. A way, perhaps, that things ought to be, a path that is favored by the universe? Examine some of the theories people have for existence that do not involve deities or creators. Examine the concept of karma, and imagine a universe where every being who was aware had a karma. To add the workings of karma to the universe really is not to give any meaning or order to o ...
    Related: logic, meaning of life, reward system, moral code, neuron
  • Lsd - 1,599 words
    LSD annon Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD) LSD), a potent hallucinogenic drug, also called a psychedelic, first synthesized from lysergic acid in Switzerland in l038. Lysergic acid is a white odorless drug, a component of the mold of ERGOT. Ergot is a product of the fungus Claviceps purpurea. Th e bio-active ingredients of ergot are all derivatives of lysergic acid. LSD is a semi-synthetic derivative of lysergic acid. Thus LSD is an “ergot” - like substance. The drug evokes dreamlike changes in mood and thought and alters the perception of time and space. It can also create a feeling of lack of self-control and extreme terror. Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD) also goes by names lik ...
    Related: vitamin c, physical effects, body weight, attempting
  • Mind And Machine - 1,208 words
    ... emanding the application of fuzzy logic come in. Using fuzzy algorithms on sets of data, such as differing intensities of illumination over time, we can infer a comfortable lighting level based upon an analysis of the data. Taking fuzzy logic one step further, we can incorporate them into fuzzy expert systems. This systems takes collections of data in fuzzy rule format. According to Dr. Lotfi, the rules in a fuzzy logic expert system will usually follow the following simple rule: if x is low and y is high, then z is medium. Under this rule, x is the low value of a set of data (the light is off) and y is the high value of the same set of data (the light is fully on). z is the output of th ...
    Related: machine, operating system, over time, technological innovation, distribution
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