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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: naturalization service

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  • A Journey Though The Golden Gates Of Promise - 2,284 words
    ... because, without them, the United States would become overpopulated and it would slowly deteriorate. If Congress did not create the quota laws as a way to control who is allowed to enter the country, it would leave the magnificent "Golden Gates" open to anyone who wanted to enter the promise land. It is insane to even consider letting everyone of every ethnicity into the United States because the results would be devastating for the American society. American citizens often criticize that the quota laws discriminate towards different ethnic groups, but, in reality, it is common sense to prefer letting immigrants into the country that are more likely to "fit in" with the cultures being p ...
    Related: golden, promise, another country, labor laws, reject
  • Afganistans Apartheid - 1,096 words
    Afganistan`s Apartheid Beginning on September 27, 1996, an extremist militia group known as the Taliban seized control of Kabul, the capital of Afghanistan. Upon seizing control, the Taliban has instituted a system of gender apartheid, which has placed women into a state of virtual house arrest. Since that time the women and girls of Afghanistan have been stripped of all human rights including their voice, visibility and their mobility. The Campaign to stop Gender Apartheid, led by the Feminist Majority Foundation, has brought together numerous human right and womens organizations around the world to demand an end to the abuses of the women in Afghanistan. In the 1980s when the Soviet Union ...
    Related: apartheid, naturalization service, nations high commissioner, family member, islamic
  • Charlie Chaplain - 1,872 words
    Charlie Chaplain Charlie Chaplin was born on April 15, 1889, in London, England to Charles Chaplin, Sr., and Hannah Hill. He was taught to sing before he could talk and danced just as soon as he could walk. At a very young age Chaplin was told that he would be the most famous person in the world. When Charlie was five years old he sang for his mother on stage. Everyone in the audience loved him and threw their money onto the stage. When Chaplin was eight, he appeared in a clog dancing act called "Eight Lancashire Lads" Once again he was loved by the audience and he was excited with the attention he received. Charlie's half-brother , Sidney, became his agent and when Charlie was ten years old ...
    Related: chaplain, charlie, charlie chaplin, york times, modern times
  • Cultural Diversity In The Workplace - 1,376 words
    ... anded. Today, diversity is a serious corporate initiative that is seen as helping those at a disadvantage. Through their commitment and involvement of diversity issues, Xerox was awarded the prestigious Malcolm Baldridge quality award in 1989 for its three decade campaign to hire and promote women as well as minorities (Managing diversity: Lessons from the private sector, AOL Electric Library). The company has been a leader in the development of diversity initiatives which include programs designed to improve employee motivation, and teamwork through helping people to understand differences in gender and race as well as disabilities. Although some of these programs go back over thirty ye ...
    Related: cultural diversity, diversity, diversity in the workplace, diversity training, managing diversity, workplace
  • Immigrants - 1,601 words
    Immigrants Should the United States take on more immigrants? Is the United States hurting from immigration problems? These issues have been debated on for generation. "According to the Immigration and Naturalization Service, approximately 300,000 illegal immigrants enter the United States annually" (Cozic 12). This large number of immigrants causes many different emotions. For some Americans, immigration is an adversity. Many Americans past and present have reacted to immigrants with fear: fear of unemployment and lower standards of living, fear of different religions and races, fear that immigration is spoiling the U.S. for those already here. The issues of immigration has three important t ...
    Related: naturalization service, demand curve, constitutional right, legalizing, environmental
  • Immigration - 1,688 words
    Immigration To US For many, immigration to the United States during the late 19th to early 20th century would be a new beginning to a prosperous life. However there were many acts and laws past to limit the influx of immigrants, do to prejudice, such as the Chinese Exclusion Act. Later on into the 20th century there would be laws repealing the older immigration laws and acts making it possible for many more foreigners to immigrate to the United States. Even with the new acts and laws that banned the older ones, no one can just walk right in and become a citizen. One must go through several examinations and tests before he or she can earn their citizenship. The Immigration Act of March 3, 189 ...
    Related: immigration, immigration laws, immigration reform, asia pacific, chinese exclusion act
  • Immigration - 791 words
    Immigration Immigraton in the U.S. While immigration has played an important role in the building and formation of America, new federal laws have resulted in mass immigration. Throughout history, Congress has enacted laws and has had to amend them to control the flow of both legal and illegal migration to the United States. In 1948, legislation was first enacted in an effort to control the number of applicants fleeing persecution; it permitted 205,000 refugees to enter the United States. In 1952, Congress set in place major regulations setting parameters and quotas mostly for the eastern hemisphere and leaving the western hemisphere unrestricted. In 1953, congress was again faced with having ...
    Related: immigration, immigration reform, legal immigration, mass immigration, criminal justice
  • Immigration Problem - 1,986 words
    Immigration Problem The world has gone through a revolution and it has changed a lot. We have cut the death rates around the world with modern medicine and new farming methods. For example, we sprayed to destroy mosquitoes in Sri Lanka in the 1950s. In one year, the average life of everyone in Sri Lanka was extended by eight years because the number of people dying from malaria suddenly declined. This was a great human achievement. But we cut the death rate without cutting the birth rate. Now population is soaring. There were about one billion people living in the world when the Statue of Liberty was built. There are 4.5 billion today. World population is growing at an enormous rate. The wor ...
    Related: american immigration, illegal immigration, immigration, immigration problem, legal immigration
  • Immigration Problem In The Us - 1,111 words
    ... he problem. Faster citizens processing, helping illegals country's economy such as NAFTA which is already in affect. Some suggest tamper proof residency cards, computerize the I.N.S., increases the number of boarder patrol agents, and build a wall around the U.S. and problem countries. There has been many suggestions made in dealing with this problem. The Gallegly bill is one of them. If ever completed by House-Senate conferees, is likely to include several conditions already adopted in similar form by both chambers. As passed by the House and Senate, the bill would: Increase the number of border patrol agents by 1,000 each year between 1996 and 2000, roughly doubling the force to reach ...
    Related: american immigration, illegal immigration, immigration, immigration policy, immigration problem, immigration reform, legal immigration
  • Immigration: Should America Close The Golden Door - 1,654 words
    ... In the end a young immigrant population may very well save such programs as social security by increasing the number of workers in the market (Mont 18). These are all economic benefits, but the diversity the United States gains is a priceless commodity that future generations of Americans will need to succeed in a growing international job market. The Cost of Immigration The United States immigration policy does not allow people to immigrate if they are expected to be dependant on public services. Yet in 1993 approximately 12% of the 5.9 million recipients of Supplemental Security Income benefits were immigrants, even though they only account for about 5% of the population (Mont 15). Sta ...
    Related: america, golden, working poor, make money, searching
  • International Adoption - 1,615 words
    International Adoption International Adoption There are many reasons as to why people choose to adopt a child. Sometimes it has to do with infertility and couples decide to adopt children because, I could not have biological children and I do not believe in some methods of fertility treatments (Carney), but there are other reasons too. According to Christine Adamec, some people think that it is better to adopt than to bring another child into the world. Others do not want to pass a certain genetic problem onto other generations, and some have medical problems that would make the pregnancy more difficult than usual, or even harmful to the mothers health. These types of adoptive parents are ca ...
    Related: adoption, family problems, birth control, medical care, homosexual
  • Interrogations Of Chinese Immigrants At Angel Island - 2,232 words
    Interrogations of Chinese Immigrants at Angel Island Chinese immigration, after being shut down for many years by governmental legislation and an anti- Chinese climate resumed quickly after 1906. The major earthquake and fire that occurred in San Francisco lent the Chinese immigrants a window of opportunity to regain entrance to America. Immigrants could now claim, without proof, that they were indeed the son or daughter of a citizen or a partner in a legitimate business. These paper sons and paper merchants increased the number of Chinese immigrants by an unbelievable rate. It was this supposed population explosion that would lead the United States to investigate all incoming Chinese immigr ...
    Related: angel, chinese, chinese family, chinese immigrants, chinese immigration, chinese women
  • Interrogations Of Chinese Immigrants At Angel Island - 2,166 words
    ... with particular scrutiny. These interrogations were particularly strenuous and the questioning extremely detailed. Examples abound of tricky questioning such as this line of questioning from docket #19431/1-2 (Box 1211 National Archives): Q. What is his occupation? A. I do not know. Q. Did he tell you what his occupation was? A. I did not ask him and he did not tell me. Q. Did he tell you he was a business partner of your husband? A. Yes; he said he was in business with my husband, and that when he departed he left the business with my husband. Q. Why a moment ago, did you state that you did not know what the native of the nature of the business was? (67). As demonstrated in this excerpt ...
    Related: angel, chinese, chinese immigrants, chinese people, chinese women, ellis island
  • Japanese Americans - 1,724 words
    Japanese Americans The Japanese Americans have maintained loyalty to the United States throughout the history of there immigration beginning in 1843 (Leathers, 6). Over the years, they have persevered through the trials and tribulations of discrimination and prejudice. The white community often discriminated them because of the misunderstanding of their language and culture. They overcame this obstacle, and became productive citizens of the United States of America. The immigration of the Japanese into the United States was first recorded in 1843. Because of the strong currents and winds, sea traders and fishing fleets from many nations learned to exploit these winds and currents to travel f ...
    Related: american public, american society, american state, japanese, japanese american, japanese government, native americans
  • Japanese Immigrants And The Following Generations Had To Endure - 995 words
    Japanese immigrants and the following generations had to endure discrimination, racism, and prejudice from white Americans. They were first viewed as economic competition. The Japanese Americans were then forced into internment camps simply because of the whites fear and paranoia. The Japanese first began to immigrate to the United States in 1868. At first they came in small numbers. US Census records show only 55 in 1870 and 2,039 in 1890. After that, they came in much greater numbers, reaching 24,000 in 1900, 72,000 in 1910, and 111,000 in 1920.(Parrillo,287) Most settled in the western states.(Klimova,1) Many families in Japan followed the practice of primogeniture, which is when the elde ...
    Related: endure, japanese, japanese american, west coast, racial bias
  • Justice Department - 800 words
    Justice Department It is the executive department of the United States federal government, created by Congress in 1870 to assume the functions performed until then by the Office of the Attorney General. The department is headed by the attorney general, which is appointed by the president with the approval of the Senate. The Attorney General is Janet Reno she receives 181, 500 a year. The functions of the department include providing means for the enforcement of federal laws and investigating violations thereof; supervising the federal penal institutions; furnishing legal counsel in cases involving the federal government and conducting all suits brought before the U.S. Supreme Court in which ...
    Related: criminal justice, justice department, national security, international trade, wildlife
  • Terorrism And Security Measures - 1,181 words
    Terorrism And Security Measures The government can implement many new methods to increase security, or better yet give off the image of better security which is what they have predominantly done, yet ultimately there will always be a way to bypass or come up with a new way to infiltrate that measure. The government so far has done a variety of things ranging from the closing of the Dulles airport (permanently), working with the FAA on new security measures, having pilots carry handguns, and a not so specific, profiling. Well the first and easiest of the new security measures is the permanent closing of the airport, which is very near the heart of our nation's political machine. Seeing how ai ...
    Related: security measures, equal protection, salt lake, privacy issues, tooth
  • To Welcome With Open Arms - 213 words
    To Welcome With Open Arms Many Americans have skewed notions about immigration, and those perceptions influence decision in Washington and presidential candidates on the campaign trail. Some people think immigration is out of control; a few suggest that it should be stopped altogether. The problem is that many people have illegal immigration and legal immigration mixed up. They think that because the first is a problem, the second must be a problem, too. But that is not the case. Legal immigration provides tangible benefits for our society. And besides, it's actually declining in the United States, and has been for the last four years. So the idea that legal immigration is out of control is ...
    Related: animal testing, legal immigration, online available, presidential, publishing
  • Us Mexico Border - 1,830 words
    US Mexico Border June 22, 2000 "Corranle, all viene la migra!", translated into English, this means "Run, there comes immigration!" This is what illegal immigrants shout everyday when they are about to cross the Rio Grande in search for better lives. Unfortunately, not many get through alive because of the militarization that has developed on the U.S. border with Mexico. Operation Rio Grande continues a process put in motion over a century ago by the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo. It tries to erase the reality of a social geographical order that defies neat national divisions and impose a narrow notion of citizenship on people on both sides of the international boundary. In the process, the U. ...
    Related: border, border patrol, mexico, mexico city, national security
  • Watkins V United States 1957 354 Us 178 - 795 words
    Watkins v. United States (1957) 354 U.S. 178 Facts: Watkins was subpoenaed to testify in a congressional hearing to investigate alleged wrong doings of the Attorney General and the department of justice. Throughout the questioning the congressional committee asked questions that could result in Watkins incriminating himself because of his political beliefs. Due to this Watkins evoked his 5th Amendment right not to answer the question. By doing so the congressional committee indicted him and the Court of appeals upheld Congress's claim. Question: Does Article one of the Constitution bestow to congress the power to interrogate citizens out of a court of law? And can the 5th amendment be used i ...
    Related: watkins, bill of rights, east indian, political beliefs, expired
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