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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: natural law

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  • A Literary Critique Of C S Lewis - 1,048 words
    A Literary Critique of C. S. Lewis A Literary Critique of C. S. Lewis: The Case for Christianity, The World's Last Night and Problem with Pain I. Introduction II. Brief Biographical Information III. The Case for Christianity - Right and Wrong as a Clue to the Meaning of the Universe IV. The Problem with Pain - Divine Omnipotence V. The World's Last Night - The Efficacy of Prayer VI. Conclusion A Critique of C. S. Lewis "A Relativist said, 'The world does not exist, England does not exist, Oxford does not exist and I am confident that I do not Exist!' When Lewis was asked to reply, he stood up and said, 'How am I to talk to a man who's not there?'" - C. S. Lewis: A Biography Clive Staples Lew ...
    Related: c. s. lewis, critique, lewis, literature and language, world war i
  • Abortion - 1,731 words
    Abortion Abortion is the ending of pregnancy before birth and is morally wrong. An abortion results in the death of an embryo or a foetus. Abortion destroys the lives of helpless, innocent children and illegal in many countries. By aborting these unborn infants, humans are hurting themselves; they are not allowing themselves to meet these new identities and unique personalities. Abortion is very simply wrong. Everyone is raised knowing the difference between right and wrong. Murder is wrong, so why is not abortion? People argue that it is not murder if the child is unborn. Abortion is murder since the foetus being destroyed is living, breathing and moving. Why is it that if an infant is dest ...
    Related: abortion, induced abortion, pro-life movement, unborn child, candle
  • Affects Of The Enlightenment - 563 words
    Affects Of The Enlightenment Many men and women had significant impacts on the historical period known as the Enlightenment. Three men that had such an impact on the Enlightenment were Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and Montesquieu. Each of these men had different theories and ideas about what type of government there should be. This resulted in many people having different opinions on how the government should rule their country. Due to this, the Enlightenment was a very chaotic and opinionated period. During the seventeenth century, England was on the verge of a civil war. It was split between an absolute monarchy and a self governed society. One man who believed in absolute monarchy was Thoma ...
    Related: enlightenment, legislative branch, executive branch, two treatises of government, monarchy
  • Anselm And Aquinas - 1,195 words
    Anselm and Aquinas Although born in Alpine Italy and educated in Normandy, Anselm became a Benedictine monk, teacher, and abbot at Bec and continued his ecclesiastical career in England. Having been appointed the second Norman archbishop of Canterbury in 1093, Anselm secured the Westminster Agreement of 1107, guaranteeing the (partial) independence of the church from the civil state. In a series of short works such as De Libertate Arbitrii (On Free Will), De Casu Diaboli (The Fall of the Devil), and Cur Deus Homo (Why God became Man), Anselm propounded a satisfaction theory of the atonement and defended a theology like Augustines', that emphasized the methodological priority of faith over re ...
    Related: anselm, aquinas, thomas aquinas, roman catholic, natural world
  • Are Science And Religion One - 2,121 words
    ... rature if there is only one thing that exists? By definition temperature is the speed and frequency of collisions between particles. Thus we find ourselves once more in a paradoxical situation. On the one hand the equations predict a specific temperature greater than zero but, on the other hand, the unified state must be at temperature zero because there are no particle interactions. This tendency to paradox displayed by the equations of cosmology and built into the foundations of mathematics, if looked at squarely and taken at face value, is telling us something profound about the structure of the world. Paradox is built into the fabric of the universe in a profound and interesting way. ...
    Related: religion, science, face value, moral implications, advent
  • Catholic Church And Contraception - 1,451 words
    Catholic Church And Contraception The issue of contraception has been an extremely controversial and debated one in the Catholic Church. The Catholic religion declares that the three requirements for healthy sexual expression include a mutual physical drive for pleasure, intimacy and committed love between the couple, and the openness to procreation and parenting children. This last aspect is the subject of much disagreement between people both inside and outside the church community. The authoritative voice of the church, the Magisterium, holds that artificial contraception is a sin and only accepts the form of contraception called Natural Family Planning. This method involves avoiding sexu ...
    Related: catholic, catholic church, catholic religion, contraception, emergency contraception
  • Catholic Church And Contraception - 1,414 words
    ... cal states that artificial contraception is contradictory to this language. Pope John Paul II, in detail, says in his document about the difference between artificial contraception and Natural Family Planning, "It is a difference which is much wider and deeper than is usually thought, one which involves in the final analysis two irreconcilable concepts of the human person and of human sexuality. The choice of the natural rhythms involves accepting the cycle of the person.. which means to recognize both the spiritual and corporal character of conjugal communion and to live personal love with its requirement of fidelity." (Pope John Paul II #32). Most recently, Veritatis Splendor written b ...
    Related: catholic, catholic church, catholic tradition, contraception, national catholic reporter
  • Charlotte Perkins Gilmans The Yellow Wallpaper - 617 words
    Charlotte Perkins GilmanS The Yellow Wallpaper The Yellow Wallpaper: Symbols of a Womans Submissions In Charlotte Perkins Gilmans The Yellow Wallpaper, we see a shivering study of derangement. It is a grievous story narrated by a young woman driven to insanity by a husband that imposes a rest/cure for her sickness, although he believes that it is only temporary nervous depression... (118). This short story graphically reflects her torment and her husbands control over her. The woman has a mental breakdown, yet John, her husband, continuously tells her that she is fine. I am a doctor, dear, and I know. You are gaining flesh and color, your appetite is better, I feel really much easier about y ...
    Related: charlotte, charlotte perkins, charlotte perkins gilman, perkins, perkins gilman, the yellow wallpaper, wallpaper
  • Christianity - 1,157 words
    ... marriage is part of the seven sacraments, and when a couple consent themselves to marriage, the civil Court has no power or authority over this indissoluble bond. Jesus himself teaches, "Therefore, what God has joined together, no human being must separate. They are not free to marry again while their previous wife or husband is still alive. 'The remarriage of persons divorced from a living, lawful spouse contravenes the plan and law of God as taught by Christ. They are not separate from the Church, but they cannot receive Eucharist communion. They will lead Christian lives especially by educating their children in the faith.' (Catechism of the Catholic Church 1665) However, the Catholic ...
    Related: christianity, natural law, roman catholic, civil law, treating
  • Christians And Contraception - 1,458 words
    Christians And Contraception Christians and Contraception: Why it is Your Choice, and Why Christianity Was Wrong in the Past INTRODUCTION Contraception History Contraception is defined by Websters II New Riverside Dictionary as the prevention of conception. Its synonym is birth control; defined as the avoidance of unwanted pregnancies by preventing fertilization by the use of contraceptives or continence. It is argued that many forms of birth control are not in fact contraceptives because they do not interrupt the conceptual process, but merely inhibit the survival of the fertilized egg. While we will still frame our discussion in the general category of birth control, the distinctions are ...
    Related: christian tradition, contraception, early christian, roman catholic, pope paul
  • Cicero, Was Truly A Man Of The State His Writings Also Show Us He Was Equally A Man Of Philosophical Temperament And Affluenc - 1,955 words
    Cicero, was truly a man of the state. His writings also show us he was equally a man of philosophical temperament and affluence. Yet at times these two forces within Cicero clash and contradict with the early stoic teachings. Cicero gradually adopted the stoic lifestyle but not altogether entirely, and this is somewhat due to the fact of what it was like to be a roman of the time. The morals of everyday Rome conflicted with some of the stoic ideals that were set by early stoicism. Thus, Cicero changed the face of stoicism by romanizing it; redefining stoicism into the middle phase. Of Cicero it can be said he possessed a bias towards roman life and doctrine. For Cicero every answer lay withi ...
    Related: ideal state, philosophical, temperament, ideal society, roman society
  • Civil Rights And Disobedience - 1,630 words
    Civil Rights And Disobedience By acting civil but disobedient you are able to protest things you dont think are fair, non-violently. Henry David Thoreau is one of the most important literary figures of the nineteenth century. Thoreaus essay "Civil Disobedience," which was written as a speech, has been used by many great thinkers such as Martin Luther King Jr. and Mahatma Ghandi as a map to fight against injustice. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was a pastor that headed the Civil Rights movement. He was a gifted speaker and a powerful writer whose philosophy was non-violent but direct action. Dr.Kings strategy was to have sit-ins, boycotts, and marches. Dr. Kings "Letter from Birmingham Jail" was ...
    Related: civil disobedience, civil rights, civil rights movement, disobedience, individual rights, rights movement
  • Class Struggles - 2,658 words
    ... oyer, who are the exploiters ? Who makes up the dominant class today ? This question will become clear if we bear in mind there are two ways to move goods in society, by the use of violence, which is the political way, by trade and gifts, which is the economic way. Capitalism is the use of trade and gifts, not the use of politics, to distribute goods in society. All other regimes resort to violence. Marx and Engels emphasize the point themselves. Feudalism and slavery are based on state coactive powers. The results of their work are simply confiscated from the workers, and if they do not like it and try to escape, policemen and soldiers will drag them back to where they belong, so they m ...
    Related: class struggle, middle class, ruling class, technological innovation, total population
  • Convicting Raskolnikov Dostoevskys Views On Criminal Justice - 1,409 words
    Convicting Raskolnikov Dostoevsky's views on Criminal Justice At the close of Crime and Punishment, Raskolinkov is convicted of Murder and sentenced to seven years in Siberian prison. Yet even before the character was conceived, Fyodor Dostoevsky had already convicted Raskolinkov in his mind (Frank, Dostoevsky 101). Crime and Punishment is the final chapter in Dostoevsky's journey toward understanding the forces that drive man to sin, suffering, and grace. Using ideas developed in Notes from Underground and episodes of his life recorded in Memoirs of the House of the Dead, Dostoevsky puts forth in Crime in Punishment a stern defense of natural law and an irrefutable volume of evidence condem ...
    Related: criminal, criminal justice, fyodor dostoevsky, raskolnikov, doing good
  • Convicting Raskolnikov Dostoevskys Views On Criminal Justice - 1,356 words
    ... kov could transform his ideas into reality, however, he needed a "trigger," or some event which would bridge the gap between the imaginary world of his ideas and the reality of his life in Petersburg (Nutall 158). That event occurs, ironically, just when Raskolnikov is about to disband his journey into the "extraordinary" elite. He overhears a conversation which indicates that the old woman, Alena Ivanovna, will be home alone at a certain hour. His encounter with Alena, then "simply concretized the possibility of applying his ambition, which had been germinating in his subconscious, to the local Petersburg conditions of his own life" (Frank Dostoevsky 108). Even at this point, however, R ...
    Related: criminal, criminal behavior, criminal justice, raskolnikov, real life
  • David Hume - 2,175 words
    David Hume "I was from the beginning scandalised, I must own, with this resemblance between the Deity and human creatures." --Philo David Hume wrote much about the subject of religion, much of it negative. In this paper we shall attempt to follow Hume's arguments against Deism as Someone knowable from the wake He allegedly makes as He passes. This kind of Deism he lays to rest. Then, digging deeper, we shall try our hand at a critique of his critique of religion, of resurrecting a natural belief in God. Finally, if there's anything Hume would like to say as a final rejoinder, we shall let him have his last word and call the matter closed. To allege the occurrence of order in creation, purpos ...
    Related: david, david hume, hume, philosophy of religion, present state
  • Doctrine Of Creation - 1,325 words
    Doctrine Of Creation Doctrine of creation 'What do we mean by creation? How helpful are making, emanation and/or artistic work as analogies? Is it a doctrine about the world's beginnings or origin, or about its present or future existence, or what? Creation is often referred to as a 'mystery' and this is due to its perhaps ambiguous nature. Christian theology defines creation in many different ways, which differ greatly as viewpoints on the same theme. John Macquarrie tries to make the mystery clearer by using two analogies to try to describe what creation actually is. The first of these is that of 'making'. This is best understood alongside the literal understanding of creation, which can b ...
    Related: christian doctrine, doctrine, free will, natural law, affinity
  • Election 2000 - 1,089 words
    Election 2000 Election 2000 overview Presidential election cycles are always three-ring circuses, and the 2000 election has become one of the biggest circuses ever. With a two-term president unable to seek re-election, the House of Representatives clearly up for grabs, and Democrats counting on major Senate gains -- even hoping to win control -- there is a lot at stake in this year's elections. Republicans' optimism is based on their view that they will take back the White House after an eight-year hiatus. GOP insiders believe that Americans are tired of Bill Clinton, have doubts about Vice President Al Gore and are ready for change. Republican turnout was down in 1998, which helps account f ...
    Related: election, presidential election, more important, white house, sentiment
  • Emerson And Whitman: Views Of Self - 614 words
    Emerson and Whitman: Views of Self "What is man anyhow? What am I? What are you?" asks Whitman. Who we are, what our purpose is and what the meaning of life is are all mysteries that man has tried to solve from his earliest history. Whitman and Emerson explore these ideas in their works, Song of Myself and Self Reliance. Whitman, an American poet, and Emerson, an American philosopher, take different approaches in their search for self-discovery, yet within their solutions, many parallels can be found. Emersons message is one of non-conformity and individuality. He views every man as unique within, and feels society, exterior elements and tradition are mans downfall. He urges us to be a produ ...
    Related: emerson, ralph waldo emerson, self reliance, waldo emerson, different approaches
  • Enlightenment - 562 words
    Enlightenment Philosophers Ideas of enlightenment have been seen across the world for centuries now, but the first real movements started around 1669. With the majority of its great thinkers in Europe, particularly England and France, enlightenment became a great philosophic movement marked by a rejection of traditional social, religious, and political ideas. This happened because of so many people were fed up with religion and government controlling citizens' lives, especially with their natural and civil rights. Most of the philosophers had very similar ideas. They believed that the government should aid in the protection of these rights, not limit and control them. This supports one of th ...
    Related: enlightenment, enlightenment period, natural law, social customs, republic
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