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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: natural history

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  • African Museum - 1,576 words
    African Museum Wesam Berjaoui April. 01, 2000 Professor Gloster-Coates History 132 CRN# 24386 Museum Project The first museum I went to was my favorite. I went to the Museum for African Art displaying the Hair exhibit. The name of the exhibit sounded very uninteresting, but I was proven wrong. The first thing that I learned from this exhibit is that in Africa the way your hair is done represents your position in society. Your hair was probably one of the most important if not thee most important thing to an African person. A person was distinguished into which clan or group he or she was in by his or her hair style. If you were a very wealthy person your hair was extremely well done to make ...
    Related: african, african art, african people, metropolitan museum, museum
  • Aging Theories - 1,767 words
    ... ter a certain number of divisions, the clock genes are triggered and may produce proteins responsible for cell destruction (Keeton, 1992, 50). Cellular Aging In 1961, a discovery made by Leonard Hayflick showed that normal, diploid cells from such continually Areplaced@ parts of the body as skin, lungs, and bone marrow, divide a limited number of times. Although the cells stop dividing at the point just before DNA synthesis, they do not die. The longer-lived the species, the more divisions the cells undergo. As the age of an individual increases, the number of potential divisions decreases (Ricklefs and Finch, 1995, 29). This discovery was found using fibroblasts, or cells found in the c ...
    Related: aging, aging process, bone fracture, concise encyclopedia, testosterone
  • Alcoholosm - 1,165 words
    ... ven a small head size. Furthermore, FAS children may develop hearing problems, heart defects and physical and behavioural problems. Researchers have also found that some children who were exposed to alcohol during fetal development show only some of the characteristics of FAS, these children are diagnosed as having fetal alcohol effects (FAE). However, both FAS and FAE individuals may have some degree of brain damage (Brent, 1991). Clearly, in addition to physiological, social, and psychological factors which all play a role in contributing to alcoholism, recent studies reveal that there may be a genetic predisposition to alcoholism. More specifically, medical research indicates that alc ...
    Related: natural history, university press, york oxford university press, science, abnormal
  • Catcher In The Rye - 1,475 words
    Catcher In The Rye Show two ways in which the incident with Maurice and the prostitute demonstrate the theme of mans inhumanity to man (an aspect of the world of experience). One incident (which involves the prostitute) is when Holden didnt want to have sex with her but instead wanted to chat, she responded by saying, "What the heck ya wanna talk about?" This just shows that talking isnt what she is used to doing, even if she is getting paid for it. She is probably used to the lascivious male who is only looking to satisfy his needs. Another incident is when Maurice and Sunny enter Holdens room asking for more money. You can tell that they arent used to manners and doing things in a civilize ...
    Related: catcher, catcher in the rye, the catcher in the rye, holden caulfield, small stuff
  • Catcher In The Rye - 1,043 words
    Catcher In The Rye The Catcher in The Rye Many people find that their dreams are unreachable. Holden Caulfield realizes this in J.D. Salingers The Catcher in the Rye. As Holden tells his story, he recounts the events since leaving the Pencey School to his psychiatrist. At first, Holden sounds like a typical, misguided teenager, rebellious towards his parents, angry with his teachers, and flunking out of school. However, as his story progresses, it becomes clear that Holden is indeed motivated, just not academically. He has a purpose: to protect the young and innocent minds of young children from the horrors of adult society. He hopes to freeze the children in time, as wax figures are frozen ...
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  • Charles Darwin - 1,851 words
    Charles Darwin Charles Robert Darwin was a man of many hats. He was a friend, colleague, son, father, husband; but above all, he was a naturalist. Through his dedication and perseverance did he manage to, in less than a generation, establish the theory of evolution as a fact in peoples' minds. In fact, [t]oday it is almost impossible for us to return, even momentarily, to the pre-Darwinian atmosphere and attitude (West 323). Darwin formed the basis of his theory during the voyage of the H.M.S. Beagle, on which vessel he was posted as it travelled around the globe. During that five-year span, this young man saw foliage, creatures, cultures that he had never known first-hand before. He was exp ...
    Related: charles darwin, charles robert darwin, darwin, robert darwin, animal science
  • Charles Darwin 18091882 - 423 words
    Charles Darwin (1809-1882) From a young age Charles Darwin disliked school and instead he liked observing birds and collecting insects to study. When he was 16 years old, Darwin was sent to a medical school in Scotland, which he found as a waste of time. In 1827, Darwin enrolled in the University of Cambridge, England. He also though that his time was wasted there too, as far as academic studies were concerned. Henslow, a professor of botany in Cambridge and Darwins friend, encouraged Darwin in his studies of natural history. In 1831 Henslow recommended that Darwin be chosen for the position of naturalist on the ship the HMS Beagle. For Darwin, the Beagle was chartered for a five-year mappin ...
    Related: charles darwin, charles lyell, darwin, south america, natural selection
  • Cosmogony - 1,112 words
    Cosmogony What is cosmogony? Cosmogony can be defined as a study of the physical universe in terms of its originating time and space. In other words, cosmogony is the study of the universe and its origins. The origin and the nature of the universe have been one of the most debated topics throughout history. Both the scientific and theological communities have yet to ascertain a common ground on how the universe came into being and whether it was an act of "God" or merely a spontaneous and random phenomenon. New discoveries in the scientific world provide new viewpoints on the creation of the universe and its relevance to a supreme intelligent "Creator." Due to mankind's constantly changing p ...
    Related: cosmogony, human experience, david hume, thomas aquinas, contribute
  • Darwin - 2,435 words
    Darwin From his theories that he claimed were developed during his voyage, Darwin eventually wrote his Origin of Species and Descent of Man, which exploded into the world market over twenty years after his return home. Wallace, King and Sanders wrote in Biosphere, The Realm of Life: In 1859, Charles Darwin published a theory of evolution that implied that humans evolved from apes. . .The Darwinian revolution was the greatest paradigm shift in the history of biology, and it greatly changed the way that ordinary men and women viewed their own place in the world. (1) World Book tells us: (2). . .The study of the specimens from the voyage of the Beagle convinced Darwin that modern species had ev ...
    Related: charles darwin, darwin, origin of species, the bible, diversity
  • Darwinism - 214 words
    Darwinism Darwin doesn't work here any more Richard Milton spent some twenty years studying the geology and palaeontology of the British Isles before writing Shattering the Myths of Darwinism. It was the absence of transitional fossilsthat first made me question Darwin's idea of gradual change. I realised, too, that the procedures used to date rocks were circular.Rocks are used to date fossils: fossils are used to date rocks. From here I began to think the unthinkable: could Darwinism be scientifically flawed? I became an almost daily visitor at the Natural History Museum, looking more closely again at all the famous evidence I had been taught about:the evolution of horses, Archaeopteryx -- ...
    Related: darwinism, natural history, human sexuality, british isles, stone
  • David C Mohr - 877 words
    David C. Mohr 11/02/00 WR121 Hayden Bass Civilized by way of Nature The natural evolutionary process has persisted throughout the eons of time. A new race breed appears just to be vanquished off the face of the earth a few thousand years later. A few thousand years, nothing but a drop in the bucket of time for a earth that has existed for millions of years. What a concept to delve into, the existence of a species as compared to the existence of the planet on which we call home. The Earth has had many faces over time, and is rapidly changing, as time continues to march forward. Rapidly changing from one or two continents to seven semi-continuous continents, and even to a frozen barren wastela ...
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  • Egyptmexican Pyramids - 1,097 words
    ... s three miles southwest of Cairo. The largest pyramid, 481 feet high and 786 feet along east side of base, was built for Khufu, who reigned between 2900 and 2877 B.C. The pyramid of Khafre, who reigned about 2859 B.C. is slightly smaller, but it is on a higher ground so that the apex is higher. The smallest pyramid (yet not small at all) was built by Menkure about 2800 B.C. (Casson 5). One of the most famous sites of Mayan culture is Tikal in Guatemala. Numerous buildings stayed almost intact at the Great Plaza: the Temple of the Giant Jaguar (700 A.D.), the Temple of the Masks (699 A.D), and the North Acropolis. At the heart of the Temple of the Giant jaguar is the tomb of high priest. ...
    Related: egyptian pyramids, pyramids, ancient maya, mayan culture, lenses
  • Elephant - 1,701 words
    Elephant The common name is the African Elephant, the scientific name is Loxodonta Africana, the phylum is Vertebrata, the class is Mammalia, the order is Proboscidea, and the family is Elephantidae. The Closest Relatives to the African Elephant are: the Asian Elephant, mammoths, primitive proboscidean (mastodons), sea cows, and hyraxes. Scientists believe that the African Elephant evolved from one of its closest relatives, the Sea Cow. The geographical location and range of the African elephant covers all of central and southern Africa. In Ethiopia there are isolated populations that exist around Lake Chad in Mali and Mauritania. Also in Kenya, Rhodesia, Tanzania, Zambia, Uganda, Zaire, and ...
    Related: elephant, national parks, surface area, south africa, feature
  • Elizabethan Drama - 2,729 words
    ... wer to imitate any place. This vacancy - quite literally, this absence of scenery - is the equivalent in the medium of the theater to the secularization of space ... (p. 195) On this basis Marlowe's dramatisation of the history of Tamburlaine is seen by Greenblatt as Tamburlaine's will to power in the occupation of theatrical space. Just as Elizabethan dramatists breezily rewrite historical source materials, so Greenblatt breezily rewrites Tamburlaine in terms which implicitly argue the perspicuity of Deleuze and Guattari: `Tamburlaine is a machine, a desiring machine that produces violence and death.' (p. 195) Hence the terms of Tamburlaine's dynamic occupation of stage space are furthe ...
    Related: drama, elizabethan, elizabethan drama, human life, complete works
  • Emphysema - 1,541 words
    Emphysema Introduction: Emphysema is a condition of the lungs that involves the over-inflation of the air sacs, otherwise known as the alveoli. Normal functioning of the alveoli helps breathing in normal respiration. Unlike other lung diseases this one can be inherited. This is a disease that can affect people of all ages and genders. In 1994, the number of males with emphysema outnumbered the females by fifty four percent. However, in the two years that followed the difference between males and females decreased by ten percent. Classification: Emphysema is a lung disease that is classified as a COPD. (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) Natural History (Symptoms): A person may notice var ...
    Related: emphysema, physical activity, urban areas, pulmonary disease, protein
  • England Latin Anglia, Political Division Of The Island Of Great Britain, Constituting, With Wales, The Principal Division Of - 4,616 words
    England (Latin Anglia), political division of the island of Great Britain, constituting, with Wales, the principal division of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. England occupies all of the island east of Wales and south of Scotland, another division of the United Kingdom. Established as an independent monarchy many centuries ago, England in time achieved political control over the rest of the island, all the British Isles, and vast sections of the world, becoming the nucleus of one of the greatest empires in history. The capital, largest city, and chief port of England is London, with a population (1991 preliminary) of 6,378,600. It is also the capital of Great Britai ...
    Related: church of england, division, great britain, latin, principal, southern england
  • Evolution Of Man - 1,787 words
    Evolution Of Man The evolution of man is an area of study that will never fully be understood, however, evidence has been accumulated to allow us to paste together a picture of what happened in the beginning of time. It allows us to gather an idea of how man progressed to exist in the state in which we see him now. We can see that the evolution of man was directly influenced by his environment. Man's intellectual development directly effected the physical changes that we see. It is apparent through observation that the environmental changes also induced some of the physical changes that man underwent. These environmental changes and seemingly intellectual development slowly refined man's beh ...
    Related: evolution, human evolution, homo habilis, physical development, wind
  • Evolution Through Natural Selection - 657 words
    Evolution Through Natural Selection Children often play a game called telephone, where one child whispers a statement into another child's ear, and the statement is passed on to other children; at the end of the game the last child will repeat the statement that was told to him or her. The majority of the time, the statement said would be completely different than the original one. This is an example of evolution through natural selection; where somewhere along the life span of the statement, it was modified, and the modified statement was passed on to form a new statement. Charles Darwin stated that, "individuals are the unit of selection; the struggle for existence is a matter among indivi ...
    Related: evolution, human evolution, natural history, natural selection, selection
  • Frankfurt - 672 words
    Frankfurt Frankfurt am Main, city in west central Germany, in Hessen, a port on the Main River. It is a major manufacturing, financial, commercial, and transportation center, served by rail lines and the Rhine-Main Airport, the most important in Germany. Manufactures include machinery, electrical equipment, chemicals (notably in the Hchst district), pharmaceuticals, motor vehicles, clothing, and printed materials. International trade fairs, including the world's largest annual book fair, are held in the city. Frankfurt is divided into an old town, or Altstadt, bordering the river, and a new town, or Neustadt, north of the older section. The old town, inhabited mainly by tradespeople and skil ...
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  • Franklin D Roosevelt Was Born In Hyde Park, New York On January 30, 1882 He Was - 1,697 words
    Franklin D. Roosevelt was born in Hyde Park, New York on January 30, 1882. He was the son of James Roosevelt and Sara Delano Roosevelt. His parents and private tutors provided him with almost all his education. At a young age, he became interested in birds. For his eleventh birthday, he asked his parents for a gun to began a collection of all the birds that were native to Dutchess County. By the time he entered college, he had collected and identified about 300 different kinds of birds. Today, his collection is still one of the best collectios that was ever made of the Dutches County birds. He learned how to stuff and mount a birds. Parts of his collection can be seen in the cabinet built fo ...
    Related: anna eleanor roosevelt, delano roosevelt, eleanor roosevelt, franklin, franklin d roosevelt, hyde, hyde park
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