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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: athens

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  • Athens - 750 words
    ATHENS THE ANCIENT CITY OF ATHENS is a photographic archive of the archaeological and architectural remains of ancient Athens (Greece). It is intended primarily as a resource for students of classical languages, civilization, art, archaeology, and history at Indiana University who may wish to take a "virtual tour" of the chief excavated regions and extant monuments. We also hope that this site will be useful to all who have an interest in archaeological exploration and the recovery, interpretation, and preservation of the past. Copyright All of the images presented here are from the personal slide collection of Kevin T. Glowacki and Nancy L. Klein. You are free to download and use unmodified ...
    Related: ancient athens, athens, athens greece, religion & politics, ancient world
  • Athens And Sparta - 855 words
    Athens and Sparta Athens and Sparta The country of Greece in 400-500 B.C. was led to greatness by two great city-states. These city-states were Athens and Sparta. These two states were as different as night and day. They were rivals and very diverse. As you read you will find out their differences between their form of culture and government. The city-state of Athens adopted a form of government which is now called democracy. Democracy is when the government is ruled by the people. This government consisted of an assembly , a jury , and there was a council of 500 men over 30 . The council decided such matters as to declare war or to spend money. The council was used to make decisions for the ...
    Related: ancient athens, athens, sparta, the iliad, physical education
  • Athens And Sparta The Culture - 1,029 words
    Athens And Sparta; The Culture Athens Athens was one of the first city-states. Each of these independent states consisted of a city and the region that surrounded it. Athens had a king, as did other Greek states. According to tradition, the first king of Athens was named Cecrops. Kings ruled the city-state until 682 B.C. Beginning that year, elected officials called archons headed the government of Athens. The general assembly, which consisted of all adult male citizens of Athens, elected the archons to one-year terms. After their term of office, the archons joined the Areopagus, a council of elder statesmen. The Areopagus judged murder trials and prepared political matters for the vote of t ...
    Related: athens, sparta, city states, greek state, eastern
  • Athens And Sparta: Comparison - 584 words
    Athens And Sparta: Comparison Words- 584 Athens and Sparta: Similarities and Differences One of the greatest city states of all time was the city state of Athens from which we take many of our modern ways. Their government was a full democracy in which they had an assembly was all male citizens over 25 years old, they had the council of five hundred which was chosen by lot of people over 30 and they proposed laws to the assembly. Then there was the court where there were no judges and the juries were very large, the archons which were the nine people with the most power before the assembly took it away from them. The Athenians descended from the Ionians in the attica region. Their city was m ...
    Related: athens, comparison, legal rights, middle class, totalitarian
  • Athens Vs Sparta - 1,547 words
    Athens Vs. Sparta During the times of Ancient Greece, two major forms of government existed, democracy and oligarchy. The city-states of Athens and Sparta are the best representatives of democracy and oligarchy, respectively. The focus of the times was directed towards military capabilities, while the Athenians were more interested in comfort and culture. It was the oligarchy in Sparta that put a war-like attitude as its first priority and best met the needs of Ancient Greece. These factors empowered Sparta and led to the development of an authoritative and potent state. Other contrasting issues included women's rights, social classes, and value of human life. Four rulers, Draco, Solon, Pisi ...
    Related: athens, sparta, right to vote, family foundation, travel
  • Democracy In Athens - 1,208 words
    Democracy In Athens A Democracy is defined as a government of, by and for the people. Originally, democracy meant rule by the common people. In this sense, and even before the beginning of modern class society, it was very much a class affair. It meant that power should be in the hands of the largest class: the poorest, least educated and the propertyless. As a result, democracy was feared and rejected by the educated, the cultured, and the wealthy. In classical Greece, democracy was seen by the enlightened and the educated as one of the worst types of government and society imaginable. The rule of the people was regarded as a threat to all the cherished values of a civilized and orderly soc ...
    Related: ancient athens, athenian democracy, athens, democracy, political power
  • Democracy In Athens - 1,159 words
    ... il met everyday, except for festival days and certain other forbidden days, in the Bouleuterion in the Agora. When the Assembly met, the Council would meet in the afternoon since most Assembly meetings lasted only till noon. The primary responsibilities of this body were the preparation of an agenda for the assembly and the supervision of the magistrates. Just as the Assembly required a smaller body (the Council) to prepare business for it, the Council needed a group much smaller than 500 to supervise its activities. This supervision was performed by each contingent of 50 Council members from one tribe, serving in turn (decided by lot) as prytaneis or "presiding officers" for 1/10 of the ...
    Related: ancient athens, athenian democracy, athens, democracy, direct democracy, modern democracy
  • Development Of Democracy In Athens - 1,120 words
    Development Of Democracy In Athens Development of Democracy in Athens Democracy comes from two Greek words: a noun demos which means, "people" and a verb, kratein, which means "to rule" (Ober 120). Democracy first appeared in Athens towards the beginning of the fifth century B.C. The biggest difference between Athenian democracy and almost all other democracies is that the Athenian version was a direct democracy rather than being representative. Democracy came about in Athens as a result of the growing navel power and the reforms made by leaders such as Cleisthenes and Pericles. The city-state of Athens, 5th century Athens to be precise, is the inventor and first practitioner of democracy. S ...
    Related: athenian democracy, athens, democracy, direct democracy, political corruption
  • Development Of Democracy In Athens - 1,127 words
    ... ns lived fifteen or twenty miles out in the countryside (Demand 224). This would have presented quite a burden for those in the countryside. So, it is possible that those who lived in the city were over represented. The Council, though, was automatically geographically diversified. Cleisthenes's reform, which ensured that people from the countryside, at least had some say at that stage of deliberations. Cleisthenes may also have been responsible for the Athenian practice known as ostracism. Under this procedure the Athenians would vote once a year in a sort of negative election. The unlucky winner, assuming a minimum of 6000 votes had been cast, was sent into exile for ten years. The ost ...
    Related: athenian democracy, athens, democracy, executive branch, peloponnesian war
  • Medeas Plan Is To Kill Jasons New Bride And His Two Children She Had Bore For Him And Then Flee For Athens The Chorus Tries T - 231 words
    Medea's plan is to kill Jason's new bride and his two children she had bore for him and then flee for Athens. The chorus tries to console Medea and tell her not to do such horrid things to other people particularly her children. Medea ignores their request and is stuck with the decision of whether or not to kill her children. She loves them and does not want to but she knows she must kill them to get back at her husband who had wronged her though she had done so much for him. She goes through with the act of killing Jason's new bride - Medea's children bring her a poisoned gown, which also ends up killing the King of Corinth. - And then faces the tough act of murdering her own children who s ...
    Related: athens, bride, chorus, greek tragedy, deed
  • Plato Life Plato Was Born To An Aristocratic Family In Athens, Greece When He Was A Child His Father, Ariston, Who Was Believ - 1,802 words
    Plato LIFE Plato was born to an aristocratic family in Athens, Greece. When he was a child his father, Ariston, who was believed to be descended from the early kings of Athens died, and his mother, Perictione married Pyrilampes. As a young man Plato was always interested in political leadership and eventually became a disciple of Socrates. He followed his philosophy and his dialectical style, which is believed to be the search for truth through questions, answers, and additional questions. After witnessing the death of Socrates at the hands of the Athenian democracy in 399 B.C., Plato left Athens and continued to travel to Italy, Sicily, and Egypt. (Internet) In 387 B.C. Plato founded the Ac ...
    Related: athens greece, greece, human life, knowledge plato, plato
  • Socrates Was An Ancient Greek Philosopher Who Was Accused Of Impiety And Corrupting The Youth Of Athens His Sentence Was Deat - 852 words
    Socrates was an ancient Greek philosopher who was accused of impiety and corrupting the youth of Athens. His sentence was death, byway of drinking poison. However, prior to his execution day, a friend, Crito, offered Socrates an opportunity to flee Athens, and evade his death sentence. Socrates refused to run away, and he justified his reasons to Crito. I agree with Socrates' justifications for not escaping, he accepted his death justly and faced the sentence the Athenian court declared. Throughout the Crito, Socrates explains his reasoning for not evading the government. Socrates introduces several pivotal ideas in the dialogue, which led me to agree with his decision. The first idea requir ...
    Related: accused, ancient greeks, athens, corrupting, crito socrates, death sentence, greek
  • Sparta Vs Athens - 855 words
    Sparta Vs Athens annon In Ancient Greece there were two different major forms of government, Oligarchy and Democracy. The two city-states that best represent each form of government were Sparta (oligarchy) and Athens (democracy). The democratic government in Athens, though de cently equal, fair and fairly advanced for its time, did not meet the needs of the Greeks. During a time of many military battles Athens decided to worry more about comfort and culture. It is the oligarchy in Sparta that put a war-like attitude as it's first priority and best met the needs of Ancient Greece. The Athenian democratic government, which may have given the citizens in Greece more freedom, was not the best fo ...
    Related: athens, sparta, military training, freedom of speech, army
  • Was The 5th Century Bce A Golden Age For Athens - 1,322 words
    Was the 5th Century BCE a Golden Age for Athens? subject = History 209 (Ancient Greek History) title = Was the 5th Century BCE a "Golden Age" for Athens? The 5th century BCE was a period of great development in Ancient Greece, and specifically in Athens. The development of so many cultural achievements within Athens and the Athenian Empire has led scholars to deem this period a "Golden Age." It is true that his period had many achievements, but in the light of the Athenians treatment of women, metics (non-Athenians living in Athens), and slaves it is given to question whether or not the period can truly be called "Golden." The 5th century and the Athenian Empire gave birth to an amazing amou ...
    Related: athens, golden, golden age, athenian women, persian wars
  • 13 Were The Elizabethans More Bloodthirsty Or Tolerant Of - 1,210 words
    ... repulsiveness. His is a Dionysianism so passionately self-serving, so deliberate if not cold-blooded, that, corrosive rather than life-giving like the Dionysian at its best, it turns all not only to destruction but to cheapness, ignominy, pointlessness. -Theodore Weiss, The Breath of Clowns and Kings, 1974 - The great stories of murder are about men who could not have done it but who did. They are not murderers, they are men. And their stories will be better still when they are excellent men; not merely brilliant and admirable, but also, in portions of themselves which we infer rather than see. Richard is never quite human enough. The spectacle over which he presides with his bent back a ...
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  • A Day In The Life Of An Ancient Athenian - 1,174 words
    A Day in The Life of an Ancient Athenian jenn neff A day in the life of an ancient Athenian Welcome to Athens, the marvel of Greece! The city which is the fountainhead of beauty, wisdom and knowledge. Even as your ship approaches the Athenian harbor Piraeus, you can see the marble monuments of the Acropolis and the shining golden edge of the spear, which belongs to the gigantic statue of the goddess Pallas Athene. This is one of the greatest works of the sculptor Phidias, and symbolizes both the power and justice of the "violet city" as it was called by his contemporaries. Athenian women had virtually no political rights of any kind and were controlled by men at nearly every stage of their l ...
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  • A Few Greek Gods - 1,919 words
    A Few Greek Gods subject = History 9th grade title = A Few Greek Gods The Ancient Greeks believed in a series of myths which explained nature, set up a moral code for the people, and were just folk lore of the people. In this paper, the beginnings of myths, the Greek gods themselves, and several myths concerning morals, nature, and old lore of the Ancients will be discussed. Because the myths and details about the gods were passed along by word of mouth, some myths or gods might be interchanged or different. The Greek myths started as folk lore until it began to explain nature and storytellers integrated a moral code into the myths. Many myths started out as fairy tales. As new and more effi ...
    Related: greek, greek gods, greek myth, moral code, river styx
  • A Hero Of The Ages - 1,045 words
    A Hero Of The Ages Heroes come from all sorts of places: movies, books, and even everyday life. Jen, a Gelfling, is a hero from the movie The Dark Crystal. Jen's story is one of prophecy, the never ending fight between good and evil, and love. This composition shall trace Jen's quest as well as evaluate his success in that quest, his individual self, and finally he shall be compared to one of the Greek heroes. Jen's quest can be classified as restoring the good kingdom. During a time of great change in the universe, there was a single dark crystal which held the source of balance and truth. At this time, many years before Jen's birth, the world was peaceful. However, the crystal was shattere ...
    Related: the girl, good and evil, over time, enslaved, master
  • A Midsummer Nights Dream - 744 words
    A Midsummer Night's Dream In Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" the mortal teenage characters fall in love foolishly, and the character Bottom states, "O what fools these mortals be". They are foolish because they act like children. Although Lysander, Hermia, Demetrius, and Helena appear grown-up, when they are in love they act foolishly. The four teenage lovers are fools. Demetrius is a fool because he is unaware that his love changes through out the play. At the start of the play Demetrius does not love Helena. (II ii,line 188) Demetrius says, "I love thee not, therefore pursue me not." (II ii,line 194) "Hence, get thee gone, and follow me no more." In III ii, Demetrius after being ...
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  • A Midsummer Nights Dream - 745 words
    A Midsummer Night's Dream In Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" the mortal teenage characters fall in love foolishly, and the character Bottom states, "O what fools these mortals be". They are foolish because they act like children. Although Lysander, Hermia, Demetrius, and Helena appear grown-up, when they are in love they act foolishly. The four teenage lovers are fools. Demetrius is a fool because he is unaware that his love changes through out the play. At the start of the play Demetrius does not love Helena. (II ii,line 188) Demetrius says, "I love thee not, therefore pursue me not." (II ii,line 194) "Hence, get thee gone, and follow me no more." In III ii, Demetrius after being ...
    Related: a midsummer night's dream, dream, midsummer, midsummer night, midsummer nights dream, nights dream
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