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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: athenian

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  • A Day In The Life Of An Ancient Athenian - 1,174 words
    A Day in The Life of an Ancient Athenian jenn neff A day in the life of an ancient Athenian Welcome to Athens, the marvel of Greece! The city which is the fountainhead of beauty, wisdom and knowledge. Even as your ship approaches the Athenian harbor Piraeus, you can see the marble monuments of the Acropolis and the shining golden edge of the spear, which belongs to the gigantic statue of the goddess Pallas Athene. This is one of the greatest works of the sculptor Phidias, and symbolizes both the power and justice of the "violet city" as it was called by his contemporaries. Athenian women had virtually no political rights of any kind and were controlled by men at nearly every stage of their l ...
    Related: ancient athens, ancient greeks, athenian, athenian women, family life
  • Both The Roman And The Athenian Civilization Enjoyed Recreation And Cherished It Dearly Recreation Was And Is One Of The Most - 363 words
    Both the Roman and the Athenian civilization enjoyed recreation and cherished it dearly. Recreation was and is one of the most important things in a persons life. If a person has a total lack of recreation there are chances of melancholy that can later on lead to death. Having recreation in our lives gives us a sense of happiness thatwe all need. The Romans were alike with the Greeks in a few ways. The Romans watched chariot races to entertain them just like the Greeks did, what was so fascinating About the Romans is that they had the biggest arena in the Mediterranean called the Circus Maximus. The arena held about two hundred fifty thousand people, that was five times as much as the collos ...
    Related: athenian, civilization, dearly, recreation, roman, roman empire
  • 272: Number Of Words That Redefined America - 1,107 words
    272: Number Of Words That Redefined America The two hundred seventy-two words of President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address are as significant today as they were six score and seventeen years ago. Garry Wills' Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words That Remade America, explicates these two hundred seventy-two words and paints a new picture that gives us the historical context of the President's speech. It was short enough for generations of people to remember, yet at the same time, long enough to have a great impact on the ways we think of this great republic. Wills argues that through his speech Lincoln remade the American history in that Americans would interpret the Civil War, and the Constitution, ...
    Related: america, america history, united states of america, american history, president lincoln
  • A Midsummer Night Dream - 1,514 words
    A Midsummer Night Dream Jennifer Lopez Period 7 English Book Report The Mixed up Troubles of Love A Midsummer's Night Dream is one of Shakespeare's romantic/comedy plays. This play is about love and all the troubles that it brings to people. It also has a side story about a pompous actor who has a mysterious dream in the forest. The four main characters are all trying to find love with one another and when magic is involved it causes more cause between the four than it does to help. The play is set in Monte Athena, Italy in the nineteenth century. The main characters are the four lovers Hermia, Lysander, Helena and Demetrius. The Duke and his fiance Queen Hipolyta, Puck the mischievous creat ...
    Related: dream, midsummer, midsummer night, midsummer's night, night dream
  • Alexander The Great - 5,120 words
    Alexander The Great Alexander III, more commonly known as Alexander the Great, was one of the greatest military leaders in world history. He was born in Pella, Macedonia, then a Greek nation. The exact date of his birth is uncertain, but was probably either July 20 or 26, 356 B.C. Alexander was considered a child from his birth until 341 B.C. His princehood lasted from 340 to 336 B.C. In 336 B.C. Philip II, his father, was assassinated, thus making Alexander king. Alexander became a military leader in 335, and remained one until his death in 323 B.C. He reigned from 336 B.C. until 323 B.C., when he died. His military campaign in Persia lasted from 334 to 329, and in 328 he began his campaign ...
    Related: alexander, alexander the great, great alexander, king alexander, asia minor
  • Ancient Greek Theater And Drama - 1,400 words
    Ancient Greek Theater And Drama Ancient Greek Theater and Drama Ancient Greek Theater and Drama Jennifer Mills Theater has been an integral part of almost every society for thousands of years. Starting in the last Sixth century B.C. Theater has been evolving into the glitzy, whirlwind productions of today. But in the beginning, theater was a simple affair. Originating in Greece, theater tradition was derived from religious rituals. The ceremonies of the cult of Dionysus were exuberant; much story telling took place in the form of song and dance. Everyone would partake in the story telling, forming what is known as the chorus. The first man to step out of the chorus and take a role of a chara ...
    Related: drama, greek, greek theater, theater, excellent education
  • Antigone - 1,273 words
    Antigone In ancient Greece, men who died in war fulfilled the civic ideal to the utmost. The women, destined to live out a degrading life, died in bed. Certainly, not all men died in battle, but every epitaph shows in one way or another, the city would always remember the men who died in war. Additionally, not all Athenian women died in bed; nonetheless, it was left to her family to preserve the memory of her not the city. No matter how perfect a woman was she would never receive the same status or level of social expectations from the city that a man received. No accomplishments were allowed beyond living a life of motherhood and submissiveness to a man, namely her husband. In fact, in earl ...
    Related: antigone, sophocles antigone, aggressive behavior, ancient greece, typically
  • Athens And Sparta - 855 words
    Athens and Sparta Athens and Sparta The country of Greece in 400-500 B.C. was led to greatness by two great city-states. These city-states were Athens and Sparta. These two states were as different as night and day. They were rivals and very diverse. As you read you will find out their differences between their form of culture and government. The city-state of Athens adopted a form of government which is now called democracy. Democracy is when the government is ruled by the people. This government consisted of an assembly , a jury , and there was a council of 500 men over 30 . The council decided such matters as to declare war or to spend money. The council was used to make decisions for the ...
    Related: ancient athens, athens, sparta, the iliad, physical education
  • Athens And Sparta The Culture - 1,029 words
    Athens And Sparta; The Culture Athens Athens was one of the first city-states. Each of these independent states consisted of a city and the region that surrounded it. Athens had a king, as did other Greek states. According to tradition, the first king of Athens was named Cecrops. Kings ruled the city-state until 682 B.C. Beginning that year, elected officials called archons headed the government of Athens. The general assembly, which consisted of all adult male citizens of Athens, elected the archons to one-year terms. After their term of office, the archons joined the Areopagus, a council of elder statesmen. The Areopagus judged murder trials and prepared political matters for the vote of t ...
    Related: athens, sparta, city states, greek state, eastern
  • Athens Vs Sparta - 1,547 words
    Athens Vs. Sparta During the times of Ancient Greece, two major forms of government existed, democracy and oligarchy. The city-states of Athens and Sparta are the best representatives of democracy and oligarchy, respectively. The focus of the times was directed towards military capabilities, while the Athenians were more interested in comfort and culture. It was the oligarchy in Sparta that put a war-like attitude as its first priority and best met the needs of Ancient Greece. These factors empowered Sparta and led to the development of an authoritative and potent state. Other contrasting issues included women's rights, social classes, and value of human life. Four rulers, Draco, Solon, Pisi ...
    Related: athens, sparta, right to vote, family foundation, travel
  • Banned Books - 1,374 words
    Banned Books I never heard of anyone who was really literate or who ever really loved books who wanted to suppress any of them. Censors only read a book with great difficulty, moving their lips as they puzzle out each syllable, when someone tells them that the book is unfit to read. ~Robertson Davies Throughout all of history, human beings have been continuously seeking new mediums of communication, specifically for the purpose of exchanging ideas and information. This has been done in a series of ways, including spoken language, hand gestures, and, most importantly, the written word. The written word has an advantage over all other forms of communication, for it allows many people access to ...
    Related: banned, banned books, creative writing, critical thinking, readily
  • Comparitive Philosophies And Religions - 1,983 words
    Comparitive Philosophies And Religions Life in ancient times was full of risks and uncertainty for those people living there. Much trust was put in the unknown, but as civilizations progressed, there was a feeling of need to understand the unknown and the meanings of life. Within this paper I will discuss three important issues that deal with the progress of life in relation to the civilizations of the Mesopotamians, Egyptians, Hebrews and Greeks. In ancient civilizations concepts of the afterlife were based on myth. Glamorous stories about gods and goddesses from the past were the motivation for ancient people to live their lives. In Mesopotamian culture, every day was controlled by the god ...
    Related: comparitive, greek religion, ancient civilizations, european history, codes
  • Daily Life In Fifth Century Greece - 1,638 words
    Daily Life In Fifth Century Greece Daily Life in Fifth Century Greece By Claire Bolto The daily existence of ancient civilisations has been a source of fascination for both historians and archaeologists over the centuries. An abundance of information relating to eating and drinking, clothing, childhood, cosmetics and jewellery survives in the ancient official documents, biographies and plays which have remained in tact. The majority of these however, reflect only the luxurious lives of the rich and those with authority. In the artefacts, paintings, epigraphs and other such structures which archaeologists have uncovered in the last centuries, not only do we learn more about the lives of the w ...
    Related: ancient greece, daily life, greece, religious festivals, ancient greeks
  • Democracy In Athens - 1,208 words
    Democracy In Athens A Democracy is defined as a government of, by and for the people. Originally, democracy meant rule by the common people. In this sense, and even before the beginning of modern class society, it was very much a class affair. It meant that power should be in the hands of the largest class: the poorest, least educated and the propertyless. As a result, democracy was feared and rejected by the educated, the cultured, and the wealthy. In classical Greece, democracy was seen by the enlightened and the educated as one of the worst types of government and society imaginable. The rule of the people was regarded as a threat to all the cherished values of a civilized and orderly soc ...
    Related: ancient athens, athenian democracy, athens, democracy, political power
  • Democracy In Athens - 1,159 words
    ... il met everyday, except for festival days and certain other forbidden days, in the Bouleuterion in the Agora. When the Assembly met, the Council would meet in the afternoon since most Assembly meetings lasted only till noon. The primary responsibilities of this body were the preparation of an agenda for the assembly and the supervision of the magistrates. Just as the Assembly required a smaller body (the Council) to prepare business for it, the Council needed a group much smaller than 500 to supervise its activities. This supervision was performed by each contingent of 50 Council members from one tribe, serving in turn (decided by lot) as prytaneis or "presiding officers" for 1/10 of the ...
    Related: ancient athens, athenian democracy, athens, democracy, direct democracy, modern democracy
  • Development Of Democracy In Athens - 1,120 words
    Development Of Democracy In Athens Development of Democracy in Athens Democracy comes from two Greek words: a noun demos which means, "people" and a verb, kratein, which means "to rule" (Ober 120). Democracy first appeared in Athens towards the beginning of the fifth century B.C. The biggest difference between Athenian democracy and almost all other democracies is that the Athenian version was a direct democracy rather than being representative. Democracy came about in Athens as a result of the growing navel power and the reforms made by leaders such as Cleisthenes and Pericles. The city-state of Athens, 5th century Athens to be precise, is the inventor and first practitioner of democracy. S ...
    Related: athenian democracy, athens, democracy, direct democracy, political corruption
  • Development Of Democracy In Athens - 1,127 words
    ... ns lived fifteen or twenty miles out in the countryside (Demand 224). This would have presented quite a burden for those in the countryside. So, it is possible that those who lived in the city were over represented. The Council, though, was automatically geographically diversified. Cleisthenes's reform, which ensured that people from the countryside, at least had some say at that stage of deliberations. Cleisthenes may also have been responsible for the Athenian practice known as ostracism. Under this procedure the Athenians would vote once a year in a sort of negative election. The unlucky winner, assuming a minimum of 6000 votes had been cast, was sent into exile for ten years. The ost ...
    Related: athenian democracy, athens, democracy, executive branch, peloponnesian war
  • English Theatre - 639 words
    English Theatre How different cultures affected English Theater Theater unites the past and present in a unique cultural experience. Theatre continues to thrive and has become an important subject for study in schools and universities. Reaching back in time and across the world, this ranging new history draws on the latest scholarly research to describe and celebrate theatres greatest achievements over 4,500 years, from festival performances in Egypt to international multicultural theatre in the late twentieth century. English theatre has been changed by different cultures throughout the world. The Father of drama was Thesis of Athens, 535 BC, who created the first actor. The actor performed ...
    Related: english language, theatre, dr. faustus, different cultures, dionysus
  • Explanation And Analysis Of Stoic Philosophy - 1,984 words
    Explanation And Analysis Of Stoic Philosophy Stefano R. Mugnaini Dr. Ralph Gilmore Introduction to Philosophy 26 April 1999 Explanation and Analysis of Stoic Philosophy Stoicism is, without a doubt, one of the most widely misunderstood schools of Philosophy ever established and followed by a wide number of people. The common opinion of Stoic adherents is that they are merely cold, somber individuals dedicated to the idea that happiness is evil, emotion is to be avoided at all costs and pleasure is wicked. Although they do stress control over strong emotions and that pleasure is not the sole end of life, this is a gross misunderstanding of Stoicism. According to Dr. Zeno Breuninger, Stoics be ...
    Related: explanation, moral philosophy, philosophy, stoic, bertrand russell
  • Funeral Oration Of Pericles - 1,026 words
    Funeral Oration Of Pericles There are two important matters that the "Funeral Oration of Pericles" proves, these two matters are, the great respect that Athenians have for their warrior class and how the Athenians were exceedingly proud of their city and its customs. The following paper discusses the way of life of Athenians and how the Funeral Oration of Pericles influenced it. It is a well-known fact that the Athenians had a great deal of respect for the warrior class and believed them to be among the top members of their society. The warriors were seen as the top portion of their classes. They are classified as hero's and/ or idols. The Athenians were also extremely proud of their city an ...
    Related: funeral, funeral oration, oration, pericles, city states
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