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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: nafta

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  • Environmental Issues Concerning Nafta - 474 words
    Environmental Issues Concerning Nafta In the early 1990's, the United States, Mexico, and Canada, all produced the North American Free Trade Agreement in an attempt to increase trade and reduce tariffs between the countries. With the creation of NAFTA, the world's largest trading bloc was formed with a population of around 400 million people in 1997. The financial figures were also outstanding in that the three countries had a combined $8 trillion the same year. There have been many concerns since the initiation of the agreement. Issues over cheap labor, environmental concerns, highway safety, and who will gain control over the economy, have been facing officials for some time now. A major i ...
    Related: environmental, environmental concerns, environmental issues, nafta, illegal drug
  • Nafta - 1,096 words
    Nafta In January 1994, the United States, Mexico, and Canada implemented the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), forming the largest free trade zone in the world. The goal of NAFTA is to create better trading conditions through tariff reduction, removal of investment barriers, and improvement of intellectual property protection. NAFTA continues to gradually reduce tariffs on set dates and aims to eliminate all tariffs by the year 2004. Before NAFTA was established, investing in Mexico was a difficult process. Investors needed the Mexican Government's approval and were also required to meet specific investment guidelines. These requirements necessitated investors to export a set leve ...
    Related: nafta, united states economy, north american, domestic product, producing
  • Nafta - 1,855 words
    Nafta NAFTA North American Free Trade Agreement NAFTA's proponents promised benefits for the U.S., Canada and Mexico. Benefits such as new U.S. jobs, higher wages in Mexico, a growing U.S. trade surplus with Mexico, environmental clean-up and improved health along the borderall have failed to take form. It is commonly believed that free trade between nations is a mutually beneficial arrangement for all parties involved; indeed, this is held to be an absolute truth. Though free trade is undoubtedly the most effective form of commerce between countries from a purely economic standpoint, increasingly we find that our so-called free trade agreements are horribly unbalanced. Indicative of these f ...
    Related: nafta, department of labor, job creation, high school, inexperienced
  • Nafta - 1,847 words
    ... e for babies born in Cameron County, TX climbed to 19/10,000 babies, almost twice the national average. The public health crisis plaguing the U.S.-Mexico border attracted intense media scrutiny in 1991 after three babies were born with a rare condition called anencephaly (born brainless) during a 36-hour period at the same Cameron County (Brownsville) Hospital. The Texas Department of Health Neural Tube Defect Surveillance Project reported a new cluster of defects in 1995. The Department recently declared that The entire border area remains a high-risk area [for neural tube defects] compared to the rest of the U.S. As the health crisis looms overhead, so too does the disparity in wage le ...
    Related: nafta, north american, living wage, economic development, trading
  • Nafta - 1,374 words
    NAFTA "The free trade argument states that, if each nation produces what it does best and permits trade, over the long run all will enjoy lower prices and higher levels of output, income, and consumption that could be achieved in isolation." The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), implemented in January of 1994, created a situation in North America in which there are no taxes on most products imported and exported between the three countries. Ideally, the governments of Canada, the U.S. and Mexico believed that breaking the trading barriers would increase jobs and other things as it bettered each of their economies. NAFTA, however, has not necessarily helped the economies in the way ...
    Related: nafta, north america, western hemisphere, free trade, importation
  • Nafta - 1,833 words
    NAFTA In January 1994, the United States, Mexico, and Canada implemented the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The goal of NAFTA is to create better trading conditions through tariff reduction, removal of investment barriers, and improvement of intellectual property protection. NAFTA continues to gradually reduce tariffs on set dates and aims to eliminate all tariffs by the year 2004. Before NAFTA was established, investing in Mexico was a difficult process. Investors needed the Mexican Government's approval and were also required to meet specific investment guidelines. These requirements necessitated investors to export a set level of goods and services, utilize domestic goods an ...
    Related: nafta, member states, south american, south american countries, expand
  • Nafta - 1,888 words
    ... d Uruguay joined the Treaty later the dates for the elimination of their tariffs are pushed back a whole year so that by the year 2000 they will have 100 percent eliminated tariffs. The downfall of this elimination of tariffs is that some businesses will have to cut back and restructure so some people will loose their jobs, but in the long run the economy will grow stronger from it. However, the social security system for the countries will be transformed such that a worker can work in any of the member countries and accumulate years until retirement and still receive a pension (americasnet.com). Each of the countries is using MERCOSUR in a different way to increase their productivity. I ...
    Related: nafta, national income, important role, quantity supplied, employment
  • Nafta - 1,298 words
    NAFTA On January 1, 1994, Canada, Mexico and the United States passed the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Promoted to Congress by the Clinton administration, with the assurance that it would give rise to more jobs - exactly how many though, is not precisely known. Yet, according to the Journal of Commerce, the U.S. went from having a $5.5 billion trade surplus with Mexico before NAFTA, to having a massive $16 billion trade deficit today. At the same time, it is estimated that 400,000 Americans have lost manufacturing jobs because of NAFTA within the treaty's first three years, that's about the same number of jobs which have been created in the Mexican maquiladoras. Instead of sh ...
    Related: nafta, trade area, waste disposal, business planning, liberalization
  • Nafta - 1,314 words
    ... acquire help with different companies, which in return make possible many consumer activities. An advantage to many of the Mexican consumers that cross the border everyday for goods and services is having the security of being able to rely on Mexican banks in operation here in the United States. In Return, Mexico will permit Canada and the United States to establish subsidiaries to engage in consumer opportunities for example, commercial lending, mortgage lending and the provision of credit cards. This will not only establish a market share, but will emphasize on national treatment. Another key element from the North American Free Trade Agreement is that the United States and Canada, wh ...
    Related: nafta, trade policy, reserve bank, federal reserve bank, canada
  • Nafta - 603 words
    NAFTA If NAFTA made this agreement, people would be able to move about Canada, the United States, and Mexico with ease. The unskilled workers in Mexico would migrate to "El Norte," looking for higher paying jobs. The supply of workers in Mexico will drastically decrease. Only the terminally ignorant, or those with families in Mexico, would stay in a poor country and earn low wages. On the other hand, the United States' supply of workers will increase drastically. Canada's supply of workers would not be changed dramatically, because it is so similar to the United States, only further away. The amount of workers moving from Canada to the United States and vice versa would not be severely affec ...
    Related: nafta, vice versa, food industry, fast food, competing
  • Nafta - 977 words
    NAFTA Mexico and the United States along with Canada have entered into a trilateral free trade agreement called the North American Free Trade Agreement otherwise known as NAFTA. NAFTA has got to be the largest trading agreement in history; the agreement creates a single market of 370 million consumers. The people of NAFTA talk about potential gains from increased free trade between Mexico and the U.S. as the two countries remove tariffs, other trade barriers and restrictions on investment so that businesses would have access for goods, service and investment. They argue that the U.S. stands to gain from the agreement as Mexico offers trade potential in a growing market, more investment oppor ...
    Related: nafta, foreign investment, north american, environmental issue, investment
  • Nafta - 1,686 words
    NAFTA The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which built on the 1989 U.S.-Canada Free Trade Agreement (CFTA), is the most comprehensive regional free trade agreement ever negotiated. It created the world's largest free trade area: 380 million people producing nearly $8 trillion dollars worth of goods and services. On January 1, 1994 the North American Free Trade Agreement entered into force. One of the main objectives of the Agreement is the elimination of tariffs between Canada, Mexico and the United States on "qualifying" goods by the year 1998 for originating goods from Canada and for originating goods from Mexico by the year 2008. Positive Effects on NAFTA Growth in Trade: A+ T ...
    Related: nafta, gain competitive advantage, duty free, economic freedom, worldwide
  • Nafta 5 Years Of Failure - 1,297 words
    Nafta 5 Years Of Failure NAFTA Five Years of Failure In December of 1992, Presidents Salinas (Mexico), Bush (U.S.) and Prime Minister Brian Mulroney of Canada signed the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The Mexican legislature ratified NAFTA in 1993 and the treaty went into effect on January 1, 1994, creating the largest free-trade zone in the world. NAFTAs promoters promised 200,000 new jobs per year for the U.S., higher wages in Mexico and a growing U.S. trade surplus with Mexico, environmental clean-up and improved health along the border. The reality of the post-NAFTA surge in imports from Mexico has resulted in an $14.7 billion trade deficit with Mexico for 1998. By adding t ...
    Related: nafta, cornell university, industrial relations, final report, automobile
  • Nafta And Globalization - 610 words
    NAFTA And Globalization Globalization over the past twenty has become an issue in many countries. This industrialization of second and third world countries by Western Civilization creates many opportunities for the inhabitants. Not only does it expand trading markets, but also promotes productivity and efficiency; thus improving the country and integrating it into the industrial world. This process not only benefits third world counties, but also industrialized nations by allowing them to export goods to the developing world and increase their profit margin. East Asia and Latin America seem to benefit most from this. The East Asian economy has developed the fastest with an annual growth of ...
    Related: globalization, nafta, north american free trade agreement, western civilization, returning
  • Air Traffic Strike - 4,516 words
    ... emands rested upon prevailing norms of workers' interests and power. Since World War II, labor leaders have placed a disproportionate amount of emphasis on economic gains, and the collective bargaining process has gravitated toward these areas. At the same time, management has carefully guarded its prerogatives from the bargaining process.24 In this context, it seems likely that in envisioning a future strike, controllers felt that wages could and should be one aspect of it. Yet wages were not the decisive factor for most, and their other demands, derived from a far more vital, ideological interest than economic gains, evoked their passionate and surprisingly unified response. Individual ...
    Related: strike, traffic, traffic control, traffic controllers, worlds apart
  • As We Approach The 21st Century And As The Idea Of A Global Village Is Fast Becoming A Reality, It Is Vital That We Enlarge O - 594 words
    As we approach the 21st century and as the idea of a global village is fast becoming a reality, it is vital that we enlarge our worldview and reach an understanding of, and appreciation for, the cultures of the other peoples who share the planet with us. As cultural beings, we are raised with an certain way of giving order to the world around us. Very soon, these cultural filters, which allow us to make sense of reality and shape it, become fixed, invisible and unconscious; they are part of our worldview which - as unique as we might think it is - rests on the shared values of a particular linguistic community. This network of basic assumptions which affects everything in our life (love, fam ...
    Related: global village, village, vital, cultural diversity, child rearing
  • Auto Producers In Us - 1,246 words
    Auto Producers In US The author intends to distinguish sharp differences in national origin of production and distribution of motor vehicles. American Big Three producers (Chrysler, Ford and GM) and Japanese-owned manufacturers (Honda, Nissan, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Subaru, Suzuki, Daihatsu and Isuzu). By distinguishing b/w these differences, a vehicle may be classified as domestic or foreign made. It provides a locational framework for understanding what an American automobile is. Although few are 100% domestic or foreign, the percentage of national origin of any vehicle sold in the U.S. can be determined. Difference b/w domestic and foreign made Sorting domestic from foreign cars is a geograph ...
    Related: auto, north america, selling price, make sense, dealer
  • Bloc Quebecois - 1,677 words
    Bloc Quebecois The Bloc Quebecois is the hope for Quebec, while the rest of Canada plot's to take away our individuality, heritage and language from us, we the Bloc are sworn to protect these segments of Quebec. The purpose of the Bloc Quebecois is to ensure that Quebec is fairly represented in the House of Commons and that we, the people of Quebec, obtain all that we require to ensure that Quebec will be strong in the future when we separate from Canada. If we get a fair number of seats in the House of Commons, we would not use ourpower to block economic benefits for other parts of Canada. But we would act in the best self-interests of Quebec. The Bloc is a pro-sovereignty party, and the Bl ...
    Related: bloc, house of commons, american free, care plan, destroying
  • Bloc Quebecois - 1,677 words
    Bloc Quebecois The Bloc Quebecois is the hope for Quebec, while the rest of Canada plot's to take away our individuality, heritage and language from us, we the Bloc are sworn to protect these segments of Quebec. The purpose of the Bloc Quebecois is to ensure that Quebec is fairly represented in the House of Commons and that we, the people of Quebec, obtain all that we require to ensure that Quebec will be strong in the future when we separate from Canada. If we get a fair number of seats in the House of Commons, we would not use ourpower to block economic benefits for other parts of Canada. But we would act in the best self-interests of Quebec. The Bloc is a pro-sovereignty party, and the Bl ...
    Related: bloc, north american, free trade, middle class, minister
  • Blood, Sweat Shears: A Closer Look At Sweatshops - 1,180 words
    Blood, Sweat & Shears: A Closer Look At Sweatshops Blood, Sweat, and Shears: A Closer Look at Sweatshops How can you tell if the product you are about to purchase was made by a child, by teenaged girls forced to work until midnight seven days a week, or in a sweatshop by workers paid 9 an hour? The sad fact is...You cannot. The companies do not want you to know, so they hide their production behind locked factory gates, barbed wire and armed guards. Many multinationals refuse to release to the American people even the list and addresses of the factories they use around the world to make the goods we purchase. The corporations say we have no right to this information. Even the President of th ...
    Related: sweat, sweatshops, american free, minimum wage, accounting
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