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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: mysticism

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  • Jewish Mysticism The Kabbalah - 1,451 words
    Jewish Mysticism & The Kabbalah Jewish mysticism Three types of mysticism may be discerned in the history of Judaism: the ecstatic, the contemplative, and the esoteric (Agus). Though they are distinct types, in practice there are frequent overlapping and mixtures between them. The first type is characterized by the quest for God--or, more precisely, for access to a supernatural realm, which is itself still infinitely remote from the inaccessible deity--by means of ecstatic experiences; this method is sometimes tainted by theurgy. The second follows the way of metaphysical meditation pushed to the limit, always bearing in its formulations the imprint of the cultural surroundings of the respec ...
    Related: jewish, mysticism, middle ages, everyday life, advice
  • Mysticism - 505 words
    Mysticism In Steven T Katzs essay "Language, Epistemology and Mysticism", the"pre-experimental conditions" he writes of are the circumstances surrounding a person who experiences a mystical occurrence. The argument is that mystical experience is a personal event that happens differently for any person who experiences it. If this is true, there is no "common core" to all mystical experience. This concept brings into view a problem with writing about or verbally communicating about mystical experience in academics. Since mystical experience is an extreme personal event, it occurs within the morals and learned social constructs of the person having the experience. Every human society, even if t ...
    Related: mysticism, social constructs, life experience, human society, occurrence
  • Mysticism - 4,921 words
    Mysticism In this article I would like to bring the findings of my somewhat unusual but increasingly accepted field mysticism to the discussion, for I think they may offer some helpful insights about consciousness. Why? When a biologist seeks to understand a complex phenomenon, one key strategy is to look to at it in its simplest form. Probably the most famous is the humble bacterium E. coli. Its simple gene structure has allowed us to understand much of the gene functioning of complex species. Similarly many biologists have turned to the memory of the simple sea slug to understand our own more kaleidoscopic memory. Freud and Durkheim both used totemism, which they construed as thesimplest ...
    Related: mysticism, an encounter, nixon administration, transcendental meditation, certainty
  • Mysticism - 4,845 words
    ... e is the passage: And however much our Lady lamented and whatever other things she said, she was always in her inmost heart in immovable detachment. Let us take an analogy of this. A door opens and shuts on a hinge. Now if I compare the outer boards of the door with the outward man, I can compare the hinge with the inward man. When the door opens or closes the outer boards move to and fro, but the hinge remains immovable in one place and it is not changed at all as a result. So it is also here . . . (Clark and Skinner, 1958, p. 167; emphasis mine). A hinge pin moves on the outside and remains unmoving at its centre. To act and yet remain in her inmost heart in immovable detachment depict ...
    Related: mysticism, religious experience, human beings, oxford university press, empty
  • 60s Music Influence On Our Society - 1,930 words
    60'S Music Influence On Our Society Sixties Music and How it Reflected the Changing Times Chris Montaigne Professor Shao Rhetoric II The 1960's in the United States was a decade marred by social unrest, civil rights injustice, and violence both home and abroad. These were some of the factors that lead to a cultural revolution. The revolution attempted to diverge the fabric of American society. Teenagers were living dangerously and breaking away from the ideals that their parents held. In the process they created their own society (Burns 1990). They were young and had the nerve to believe that they could change the world. Their leaders had lofty goals as well. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. had d ...
    Related: american society, folk music, music, popular music, rock music, woodstock music
  • Alchemy - 664 words
    Alchemy Alchemy There are many ways to examine the subject of alchemy, including alchemy as a source of symbolism, psychology, and mysticism. It has also been an influence on the world view of various writers, artist, and musicians. The focus of this report is alchemy as a pre-chemistry, which gave a new impulse towards the preparation of medicinal remedies and also was a major influence on today's scientific investigations. Alchemy is an ancient art, practiced in the Middle Ages. The fundamental concept of alchemy stemmed from Aristotle's doctrine that all things tend to reach perfection. Because other metals were thought to be less perfect than gold, it was reasonable to believe that natur ...
    Related: alchemy, modern chemistry, ancient art, modern science, predecessor
  • Analysis Of The Hounds Of Tindalos - 1,873 words
    Analysis Of The Hounds Of Tindalos Textual Analysis The Hounds of Tindalos The Hounds of Tindalos is a short science fiction story containing many and varied elements that have been long associated with the genre of science fiction. This essay will identify these elements, examining their placement within this short text and also the interchange of these elements with the characteristics of other genres, more specifically, horror. Belknap Long, the author, was clearly intent of incorporating the elements of horror within the genre of science fiction and this amalgamation of these two genres was a popular combination employed by future horror and SF writers. Perhaps the inclusion of horror wi ...
    Related: textual analysis, ancient egypt, time travel, adam and eve, descriptive
  • Are Science And Religion One - 2,036 words
    Are Science And Religion One? Are Science and Religion One? Introduction I have identified the axiom of mysticism (TAM) as the scientific, religious and philosophical fact that there is only one thing that exists. Because the meaning of mysticism is commonly misunderstood this definition needs some clarification. The dictionary defines mysticism as a personal relationship with God. Given this definition it is easy to see why I have named the theory that, everything existent and non-existent is God, as the axiom of mysticism. If the theory is correct then a personal relationship with God is mandatory because God is all that can be experienced. After being confronted with TAM for the first tim ...
    Related: physical science, religion, science, general relativity, modern physics
  • Arsenievs - 644 words
    Arseniev's Revelation of Life Eternal A Review of Revelation of Life Eternal Nicholas Arseniev was a professor of New Testament and Apologetics at St. Vladimirs He wrote over 174 articles and books and died in 1977. His Revelation of Life Eternal is described as "an introduction to the Christian message." It pulls together many different mystic perceptions and beliefs, and it is an excellent entry into the diverse world of Christian Mysticism. The introduction quickly pulls the reader in by asking several basic questions about why religion even exists at all. These questions are first answered with broad answers, then Arseniev focuses on why Christian Mysticism is the answer to these questio ...
    Related: background information, orthodox church, common sense, recommend, integral
  • Bartelby The Scrivener By Melville - 1,187 words
    Bartelby The Scrivener By Melville All literary works are written from a specific standpoint. This standpoint originates from the mind of the author. The author, when creating his literary work, has a specific diagram/plan and vision of what the story is supposed to convey. However, not all readers will interpret the literary work in the way that the author him/herself has presented it. Many times, in fact, the audience will perceive the literary work as having an entirely different meaning than what it was meant to have. The short story, Bartelby the Scrivener by Herman Melville, has been reviewed by several different critics as having several different standpoints. These standpoints includ ...
    Related: herman melville, melville, scrivener, the narrator, common sense
  • Bible About Muhammad - 5,518 words
    ... a hundred different tests that the unprejudiced seeker after truth can apply to the Holy Quran and it will qualify with flying colors to being a Message from on High. Like Adam Does the miraculous birth of Jesus make him a God or a "begotten" son of God? No! says the Holy Quran: "The similitude of Jesus before Allah (God) is that of Adam; He created him from dust then said to him: 'Be', and he was." (3:59) Yusuf Ali, comments in his notes in the Quran translation: "After a description of the high position which Jesus occupies as a prophet in the preceding verses we have a repudiation of the dogma that he was God, or the son of God, or any thing more than man. If it is said that he was bo ...
    Related: bible, books of the bible, christian bible, holy bible, muhammad, the bible
  • Camelot: The Archetypal Environment - 1,298 words
    Camelot: The Archetypal Environment In Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, the setting plays an integral role in the meaning of the poem. The three settings are all inseparable from the events which take place there and the manner in which Gawain is affected by the inhabitants. Camelot, Lord Bertilak's castle and the Green Chapel and their characters are considerably distinct from each other, each affecting and appealing to Gawain in a particular way. Because of its many positive qualities and familiarity, ultimately, the most attractive and appealing setting is Camelot. Lord Bertilak's castle has several positive aspects but is not the most appealing because most of these elements are deceptiv ...
    Related: round table, sir gawain and the green knight, roman empire, cleft, alternate
  • Chinese Medicine - 1,489 words
    Chinese Medicine Acupuncture, Qigong, and Chinese Medicine Stephen Barrett, M.D. Chinese medicine, often called Oriental medicine or traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), encompasses a vast array of folk medical practices based on mysticism. It holds that the body's vital energy (chi or qi) circulates through 14 channels, called meridians, that have branches connected to bodily organs and functions. Illness is attributed to imbalance or interruption of chi.. Ancient practices such as acupuncture and Qigong are claimed to restore balance. Traditional acupuncture, as now practiced, involves the insertion of stainless steel needles into various body areas. A low-frequency current may be applied t ...
    Related: chinese, chinese medicine, herbal medicine, medicine, oriental medicine, traditional chinese, traditional chinese medicine
  • Confucianism And Chuangtzu - 501 words
    Confucianism And Chuang-Tzu The brightest signs of art and thought in civilization often spring from turmoil, be it outer war or inner strife, as is definitely the case in ancient China. During one of these periods in transition of government and ruling class, two distinct philosophies sprang from the raging waters of Chinas ever-cyclic river of war and rebuilding. These philosophies were the brain-children of two very notable individuals, Confucius and Chuang Tzu, both of whom saw the suffering of their country men and felt called upon to render the way which would relieve their people. Confucius, was a very rational, logical man who believed that the world could be set into its proper orde ...
    Related: confucianism, chuang tzu, jesus of nazareth, ruling class, fairy
  • Egoism - 1,986 words
    Egoism Egoism Psychological egoism is a reflex that every person has to orient themselves toward their own welfare. Through this, it follows that every one of his (or her) voluntary actions is some good to himself. If someone gives away the last piece of bread to someone else, it is because they want to look like a better person. Due to the fact that they would give away the last piece of bread. Human nature is completely and exclusively egoistic. People are entirely selfish and devoid of any genuine feelings of sympathy, benevolence, or sociability. They are always thinking of themselves in everything they do. Each individual is preoccupied exclusively with the gratification of personal des ...
    Related: egoism, happy life, bear arms, right to bear arms, fund
  • El Grecos Toledo - 1,056 words
    El Greco's Toledo High atop a hill of granite, surrounded by the gorge and river Tagus sits the ancient and formidable gothic Cathedral and Moorish palace, Alcazar, of Toledo, Spain. Toledo's skyline has changed little since El Greco immortalized Spain's religious centre in 1597-9(Cardillac 28). El Greco's natural talents, his "schooling," and the flare of his adopted Spain, combined to produce an artistic genius. El Greco's ability to convey manneristic images that were so original in conception and color that the detail gives a miraculous conception of cohesion to the whole work(Wethey 61). When studying this canvas, however, one must examine the passionate, moonlit sky; the artistic licen ...
    Related: el greco, toledo, counter reformation, christ child, monastery
  • Emily Dickinson - 1,248 words
    Emily Dickinson Emily Dickinson is one of the most well known poets of her time. Though her life was outwardly uneventful, what went on inside her house behind closed doors is unbelievable. After her father died she met Reverend Charles Wadsworth. She soon came to regard him as one of her most trusted friends, and she created in his image the lover whom she was never to know except in her imagination. It is also said that it was around 1812 when he was removed to San Fransico that she began her withdrawal from society. During this time she began to write many of her poems. She wrote mainly in private, guarding all of her poems from all but a few select friends. She did not write for fame, bu ...
    Related: dickinson, emily, emily dickinson, harold bloom, nineteenth century
  • For A Genuine Empiricist The Phrase God Exists Is Meaningless - 1,528 words
    ... ng of the question, a few key concepts must first be established. What is meant by the term Empiricism? To an empiricist, the occurrence of consciousness is simply the product of experience. It is assumed that all human knowledge is acquired from experience and observation alone. It is believed that we are born with an empty slate; it is through sense perception that our knowledge begins to form and shape our mind. Empiricism is against the idea of spontaneous or a priori thought (knowledge that is independent of all particular experience). They believe in a posteriori knowledge, which is derives from experience alone. The belief opposing Empiricism is that of Rationalism. In this philos ...
    Related: genuine, meaningless, phrase, concerning human, gods existence
  • From The Dream To The Womb - 1,355 words
    From The Dream To The Womb From the Dream to the Womb: Visionary Impulse and Political Ambivalence in The Great Gatsby It seems hard to believe in our period, when a three-decade lurch to the political Right has anathematized the word, but F. Scott Fitzgerald once, rather fashionably, believed himself to be a socialist. Some years before, he had also, less fashionably, tried hard to think himself a Catholic. While one hardly associates the characteristic setting of Fitzgerald's novels, his chosen kingdom of the sybaritic fabulous, with either proletarian solidarity or priestly devotions, it will be the argument of this essay that a tension between Left and religiose perspectives structures t ...
    Related: dream, womb, roaring twenties, greek philosophy, largely
  • From The Dream To The Womb - 1,418 words
    ... nce. But in Fitzgerald's secular narratives of desire, the impetus of lyric promise is decisively disintegrated by the world's crude bathos and despoliation; and the Dream lacks sanctuary beyond the sphere that resists it. Lyricism, proceeding thus to frustration, must always revert to nostalgia, to elegy: Can't repeat the past? . . . Why of course you can! (111). In the tragic chiming of these three tones - lyric promise, its failure, elegy - is composed all Fitzgerald's work. In Gatsby they are found from the outset in the opening meditation, where romantic readiness issues only in a foul dust [that] floated in the wake of his dreams, but where, in retrospect, [o]nly [dead] Gatsby was ...
    Related: american dream, dream, womb, early life, f scott fitzgerald
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