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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: mustapha mond

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  • 1984 And Brave New World - 1,196 words
    ... hidden beneath the dark mustache. O cruel, needless misunderstanding! O stubborn, self-willed exile from the loving breast! Two gin-scented tears trickled down the sides of his nose. But it was all right, everything was all right, the struggle was finished. He had won the victory over himself. He loved Big Brother. This shows the power that the Party and OBrien has had over Winston; they have taken his old understanding and beliefs and transformed them into an attitude that complies with those of the Party. The conditioning of an individual for a utopian society often results in the repression of individuality. Both novels attempt to create a utopian society. The major thing that holds t ...
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  • Brave New World - 1,458 words
    Brave New World Book Report of 'Brave New World' By Michael Tillman Theme: The theme of Brave New World is freedom and how people want it. The people want poetry, danger, good and bad things. This novel shows that when you must give up religion, high art, true science, family, love and other foundations of modern life in place of a sort of unending happiness, it is not worth the sacrifice. These are all also distinguishing marks between humans and animals that were abolished here. In exchange, they received stability with no wars, social unrest, no poverty or disease or any other infirmities or discomforts. However, they only live with an artificial happiness, which they have been brainwashe ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, world book, mustapha mond, central london
  • Brave New World - 617 words
    Brave New World Soma and orgy-porgies, sex hormone chewing gum and erotic play among children-all of these things further the power of the centralized world government in Brave New World. In a civilization that is without disease, old age, and all negative emotions, the people are forced to pay a price without even realizing it. That great price is their freedom. With mass consumption as a diversion, the New World quickly forgets the advantages of true independence. In the futurized novel by Alduos Huxley, conformity rules over individuality and scientific control successfully enslaves a brainwashed and fearful society. Bokanovsky's process is one of the major instruments of social stability ...
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  • Brave New World - 1,693 words
    Brave New World The novel Brave New World is like no other in fantasy and satire. It predicts a future overpowered by technology where the people have no religion. Has Huxley written about a degrading way of life or has he discovered the key to a perfect world that should be called Utopia? This essay will show that upon close analysis the way of life in the novel is justifiable and all the precautions that are taken are needed to preserve their lifestyle. This essay will also show that however different and easily looked upon, as horrible as their lives seem to be, in actuality it is better than ours. The first argument that would contradict the fact that Brave New World is a Utopia is the g ...
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  • Brave New World - 728 words
    Brave New World The book that I read was Brave New World. It was written by Aldous Huxley. Huxley was born in England on July 26, 1894. He came to the States in 1937. Throughout his writing career he wrote many types of things. His works included novels, poetry, and essays. Huxley had established himself as a prestigious writer by the time that he was thirty. He also received the Award of Merit for his novel Island., from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He died Nov. 22 1963. In California. I want to give you some background about the book before I get into the theme. The book itself takes place in a futuristic London. The entire Western Europe is controlled by one man, the Ford. Th ...
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  • Brave New World Aldous Huxley - 1,108 words
    Brave New World Aldous Huxley Brave New World Aldous Huxley Introduction Aldous Huxley was born on July 26, 1894 in Surrey, England. He majored in literature at Oxford College. After Oxford he did journalism work. Huxley wrote four volumes of poems before his first novel Chrome Yellow (1921). Huxley wrote 45 novels but it was Brave New World that established his fame. Brave New World is a science fiction book dealing with the way things might be in the future. Huxley describes the futures to be so organized that you lose your sense of self. Another book that deals with this aspect of the future is 1985 by George Orwell. Summary The book starts off with the director of hatcheries describing a ...
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  • Brave New World Aldous Huxley - 1,115 words
    ... e novel. Everything came out naturally in the situation. But the plot wasnt the best. What kept the story going more was the humor of the situation. It was humorous the way that this future society laughed at mothers, and looked down upon monogamy and marriage. The way that John continued to call Thomas father causing the laughter of the people working at the hatchery was humorous. Also, another thing that kept the story going was the ideas that this story discussed. Bernard in the beginning of the novel had some morals. He felt uncomfortable to have sex on the first date and he felt deep in his gut that there was more to life than what was spoon fed to him. Sadly, all of his morals and ...
    Related: aldous, aldous huxley, brave, brave new world, huxley, world aldous huxley
  • Brave New World And 1984 - 1,356 words
    Brave New World And 1984 Imagine a world in which people are produced in factories, a world lost of all freedom and individuality, a world where people are exiled or "disappear" for breaking the mold. Both 1984 by George Orwell and Aldous Huxleys Brave New World are startling depictions of such a society. Although these novels are of fictional worlds, control of the future may be subtly evolving and becoming far worse than Huxley or Orwell could ever have imagined. Each society destroys the freedom of the individual through various controlling methods such as the denial of language and literature, a caste system and conditioning. One way in which each society controls is by limiting the lang ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, world literature, everyday life
  • Brave New World By Huxley - 792 words
    Brave New World By Huxley Brave New World opens in a technically advanced future world. In the beginning of this book, we see the Director of World Hatcheries lead the new hatchery students on a tour of a Conditioning Center in London where babies are produced in bottles and pre-sorted to determine which class level they will be born into. These class levels range from Alpha-plus, the highest level, to Epsilon-minus, the lowest. There are no parents, and babies are conditioned from birth to learn certain behaviors. All diseases have been eliminated, and when people are feeling down, they just take soma, a wonder drug. Also, people are conditioned from birth not to love one person, so there i ...
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  • Brave New World By Huxley - 704 words
    Brave New World By Huxley John the savage and Mustapha Mond the world controller both have their separate ideas of what happiness is. Mustapha defends the new society, pointing out the advantages that the savage world does not have, and what he perceives as the people being happy. "But I don't want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, and I want goodness. I want sin." "In fact," said Mustapha Mond, "you're claiming the right to be unhappy." "All right then," said the Savage defiantly, "I'm claiming the right to be unhappy." "Not to mention the right to grow old and ugly and impotent. The right to have syphilis and cancer; the right to have too little to eat ...
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  • English Brave New World: Religion The Basis Of Religion Thesis: Mans Need For Answers To Questions That Cannot Be Solved Thro - 682 words
    English Brave New World: Religion The Basis of Religion Thesis: Man's need for answers to questions that cannot be solved through known applications of science and technology has resulted in the widespread belief in religion. I. Purpose Elimination of stress Addiction to soma 1. Rioting addicts 2. Religious fanatics II Characteristics Rituals Sacrifices Offerings B. Gods Interpreters Pope Dali Lama Mustapha Mond D. Writings III. Function Explaining unknown Philosophy Supernatural Providing aid Sanctioning conduct Morals Traditions Delegating decisions The Basis of Religion In the novel "Brave New World" civilized society lives in a world of science and technology. Major changes have occurred ...
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  • Religion And Tv - 1,527 words
    Religion And Tv There are presently 35 television stations owned and operated by religious organizations, but every television station features religious programming in one way or another (Postman, 116). Religious television program producers are driven by the desire to make money, and they find the best way to accomplish this is by scamming viewers and members. During this process, religion loses its authenticity. Religion is not being practiced on television, it is being mocked. Religion is no longer for worship, but for entertainment. Moneymaking scams are becoming very popular in recent years. One would like to believe some things in life are sacred. Religion is where billions of people ...
    Related: religion, religious organizations, television shows, religious ethics, episode
  • The Eleventh Commandment - 1,106 words
    The Eleventh Commandment The Eleventh Commandment portrayed the state church as being the supreme dictator. It is through the eleventh commandment that the church held it's power and control over the masses. Without the church and it's leaders to guide the masses, their society would have collapsed. However, compared to Brave New World, the whole society is conditioned to "work for everyone else"(Huxley 67) by the abuse and daily consumption of soma. Without the drug called soma, their society would have also collapsed due to withdrawal symptoms. The underlying reality between the two societies is that the masses are manipulated, controlled, and brainwashed, without resistance, to obey and f ...
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  • Undoubtedly, The Thought Of Living In, Or Forming A Utopian Society Has Flashed Through Every Persons Mind, A Few People Have - 1,301 words
    Undoubtedly, the thought of living in, or forming a utopian society has flashed through every persons mind, a few people have even tried to make this ideal dream society a reality. Unfortunately, within the pursuit of these societies the leaders become corrupt and begin to become paranoid with the fear of rebellion. Hundreds were murdered under the reigns of Adolph Hitler and Joseph Stalin in what they considered measures to maintain peace and stability, one must also consider the hardships that the citizens were forced to endure while living under these oppressive governments. This dream of forming and maintaining a utopian society was immortalized in two novels dealing with the same basic ...
    Related: forming, future society, utopian, utopian society, aldous huxley
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