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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: music hall

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  • Although Musicians Had Been Recording Fiddle Tunes Known As Old Time Music At That Time In The - 4,440 words
    Although musicians had been recording fiddle tunes (known as Old Time Music at that time) in the southern Appalachians for several years, It wasn't until August 1, 1927 in Bristol, Tennessee, that Country Music really began. There, on that day, Ralph Peer signed Jimmie Rodgers and the Carter Family to recording contracts for Victor Records. These two recording acts set the tone for those to follow - Rodgers with his unique singing style and the Carters with their extensive recordings of old-time music. Jimmie Rodgers Known as the "Father of Country Music," James Charles Rodgers was born in Meridian, Mississippi on September 8, 1897. Always in ill health, he became a railroad hand, until ill ...
    Related: country music, music, music hall, recording, rock music
  • Although Musicians Had Been Recording Fiddle Tunes Known As Old Time Music At That Time In The - 4,509 words
    ... ves' career. In 1959, Reeves recorded his all-time greatest hit, "He'll Have to Go." The theme was familiar enough. Some years earlier it might have been called a honky-tonk song. But the treatment, with Reeves' dark, intimate, velvet tones gliding over a muted backing, was something different again. The result brought him instant stardom. During the early 1960s, he also continued to dominate the US country charts, with hits including Guilty (1963), and "Welcome to My World" (1964). Tragically, on a flight back to Nashville from Arkansas on July 31, 1964, Jim and his manager ran into heavy rain just a few miles from Nashville's Beery Field and crashed, killing both men. Voted into the Co ...
    Related: country music, music, music hall, music history, music industry, pop music, recording
  • Americas Tv Role Model - 1,971 words
    Americas Tv Role Model Americas TV Role Model What America needs is a family like The Waltons, not families like The Simpsons - at least according to President George Bush. A strange remark, given that one does not normally expect the President of the United States to pass judgments on television dramas like The Waltons, let along cartoon shows like The Simpsons. The producers of The Simpsons were quick to respond, by making Bart Simpson remark that the Simpson family was really just like the Waltons family - waiting for the end of the depression. The Waltons were an imaginary rural family waiting for the 30s depression to end, while The Simpsons are a postmodern family of today. Both belong ...
    Related: americas, role model, female characters, music hall, intro
  • Charlie Chaplin - 519 words
    CHARLIE CHAPLIN The most successful comedian of all time went by the name of Charlie Chaplin. It was said by many that Charlie Chaplin was the creator of comedy, while others considered him a genius. Charlie Chaplin could make people laugh even with no sound. And even though his films were black and white he put a lot of color into everyone's life. Charlie Chaplin was a man with many talents and despite his rough childhood he strived to become the legend he is today The creator of comedy was born in London in April of 1889. His parents, Charles Chaplin and Hanna Hill were music hall entertainers but separated shortly after Charlie was born, leaving Hanna to provide for her children. Unfortun ...
    Related: chaplin, charlie, charlie chaplin, major themes, music hall
  • Charlie Chaplin - 506 words
    Charlie Chaplin Charlie Chaplin Charles Spencer Chaplin was born in Walworth, London on April 16, 1889. His parents, Charles and Hannah Chaplin were music hall performers in England, his father was quite well know in the profession. Charlie had one sibling, a brother named Sydney. At a very early age Charlie was told that someday he would be the most famous person in the world. Charlie first appeared onstage at the age of six as an unscheduled substitute for his mother. When his performance was over the audience was throwing money up onto the stage, they loved him, and he was on his way to being the most famous person in he world. Charlie had a very difficult childhood, by the time he had pe ...
    Related: chaplin, charlie, charlie chaplin, best actor, queen elizabeth
  • Charlie Chaplin - 630 words
    Charlie Chaplin Charles Spencer Chaplin was born on April 16, 1889 in Walworth, London, and lived a Dickensian childhood, shared with his brother, Sydney, that included extreme poverty, workhouses and seeing his mother's mental decline put her into an institution. Both his parents, though separated when he was very young, were music hall artists, his father quite famously so. But it was his mother Charlie idolized and was inspired by during his visits backstage while she performed, to take up such a career for himself. He achieved his ambition when he joined a dancing troop, the Eight Lancashire Lads, and this eventually led onto parts in Sherlock Holmes and Casey's Court Circus. Sydney, mea ...
    Related: chaplin, charlie, charlie chaplin, lone star, gold rush
  • Dancing And Ballet - 1,257 words
    Dancing and Ballet Dancing and Ballet Dancing is the art of moving the body in time to music. Dancing is both an art and a form of recreation. Most people dance to have fun or to entertain others, but dance can also be used for communication. Dancers express feelings of joy without saying a word. Since prehistoric times people have danced, and there are lots of kinds of dancing. There is folk dancing and religious dancing, popular dancing and theatrical dancing, to name a few. Out of all dancing, theatrical is probably the most entertaining. Theatrical dancing includes ballet, jazz, tap, and musical comedy. Theatrical dancers may take great personal satisfaction in creating something beautif ...
    Related: ballet, ballet dancers, dancing, york city, york harper
  • Josephine Baker - 1,468 words
    Josephine Baker While Jim Crow laws were reeking havoc on the lives of African Americans in the South, a massed exodus of Southern musicians, particularly from New Orleans, spread the seeds of Jazz as far north as New York City. A new genre of music produced fissures in the walls of racial discrimination thought to be impenetrable. Musicians such as Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, "King" Oliver and Fletcher Henderson performed to the first desegregated audiences. Duke Ellington starred in the first primetime radio program to feature an African American artist. And a quirky little girl from Missouri conquered an entire country enthralled by her dark skin, curvaceous body and dynamic personal ...
    Related: baker, josephine, motion picture, louis armstrong, ellington
  • Josephine Baker - 1,442 words
    ... circles. Varna produced the show Paris qui Remue, which featured Baker singing in French and wearing glamorous costumes. By the end of the 1930's, "she ventured outside the music hall into two other professional areas. One was a motion picture . . . and the other . . . was light opera."# Baker starred in two films, Zou-Zou, the story of a laundress who becomes a music hall star, and Princesse Tam-Tam. Jacques Offenbach's operetta La Creole, a light opera about a Jamaican girl, was Ms. Baker's most challenging role thus far. It opened at Theatre Marigny in Paris on December 15, 1934, and had a successful run for six months. In 1935, Baker decided she wanted to return to the United States. ...
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  • Mtv And Its Affect On American History - 1,869 words
    Mtv And It's Affect On American History MTV History In 1954, the release of "Rock around the clock", known as the original white Rock n' Roll song and becoming number one on the pop charts, marked a turning point in the history of popular music and it's success in the future. In the late 70s, early 80s, Reagan was president, then Senator Al Gore's wife led the crusade against inappropriate rock lyrics and founded the Parents' Music Resource Center(PMRC). The hippies became yuppies and began to devote their time to raising well mannered, preppie children. Rock music, a vital social phenomena among American youth, had grown dull due to it's lack of style change from earlier music. Something ne ...
    Related: american, american history, american society, american youth, history
  • Pantomime - 1,015 words
    Pantomime Pantomime This paper is about pantomime, about it's origin, it's people, how it has evolved, and how wonderful it is. Pantomime is a dramatic performance in which a story is told or a theme developed through expressive bodily or facial movement. The origin of pantomime can be traced back to classical farce and the Italian Commedia Dell'arte. Not all pantomime is silent. The completely silent performance of pantomime was invented in Rome. Pantomime is sometimes used to worship. Mime is a short way of saying pantomime and also means someone who performs pantomime. A mime, if performing on the streets, will have a hat that is passed around for spectators to put money in. When doing pa ...
    Related: pantomime, prehistoric man, the harlequin, modern american, hunting
  • Solo Report - 872 words
    SOLO Report This book, in my opinion, is a very good example of a serial killer, and his ironic demise. The book begins with an example of serial killing, where a powerful, influential man is killed by an assassin. The book, after the killing, follows the killer to an unusual place-a concert hall. There it is found that the killer is internationally famous concert pianist John Mikali. This man, Mikali, has been tormented by death and pain all of his life. His family has been based through a stout naval history, as his father, and relatives past have all been commanders and captains of great naval ships. The one break in the chain was his Grandfather and him, John, who is a concert pianist. J ...
    Related: solo, serial killer, naval history, master plan, alter
  • The Beatles - 1,914 words
    ... st pairing on disc. Although their songwriting styles were increasingly contrasting, there were still striking similarities, as both songs were about the Liverpool of their childhood. Lennon's lyrics to 'Strawberry Fields Forever', however, dramatized a far more complex inner dialogue, characterized by stumbling qualifications ('That is, I think, I disagree'). Musically, the songs were similarly intriguing, with 'Penny Lane' including a piccolo trumpet and shimmering percussive fade-out, while 'Strawberry Fields Forever' fused two different versions of the same song and used reverse-taped cellos to eerie effect. It was intended that this single would be the jewel in the crown of their ne ...
    Related: beatles, eric clapton, george martin, cultural icon, cartoon
  • The Beatles - 1,524 words
    The Beatles When people hear the name "The Beatles" most people think of lead singer, John Lennon. However, the role of Paul McCartney is often overlooked. It was McCartney, not Lennon who was the driving force behind the Beatles. John Lennon and Paul McCartney were in many bands together before the forming of the Beatles. In 1962, along with Ringo Starr1 and George Harrison, they formed the rock group known as "The Beatles". The group featured a modern rock that was new and popular during the period with John and Paul composing and doing the leads on most of the songs. They were backed by George on rhythm and bass guitar and Ringo on drums. George and Ringo also assisted on backing vocals. ...
    Related: beatles, music hall, george harrison, more successful, naomi
  • Waiting For Godot: Samuel Becketts Theatre Of The Absurd - 1,082 words
    ... the expectation of Estragon and Vladimir (SGSB, 44). Characterization is another tool implemented to the end of absurdism. The quarreling couple, Vladimir and Estragon have complementary personalities. Vladimir is more masculine or Apollonian: practical, persistent, serious and strong. Estragon is more feminine or Dionysian: a poet, volatile, dreaming, skeptical and weak. At times, through their incessant bickering, it is suggested that they disunite. Yet it is the differences in their natures that make them highly compatible, to the point that one is incomplete without the other. Beaten up by mysterious strangers every night, Estragon is protected by Vladimir who sings him to sleep with ...
    Related: absurd, samuel, samuel beckett, theatre, waiting for godot
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