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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: muscular dystrophy

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  • Cerebral Pasy Vs Muscular Dystrophy - 780 words
    Cerebral Pasy Vs. Muscular Dystrophy Muscular dystrophy is a rare inherited muscle disease in which the muscle fibers are unusually susceptible to damage. The muscles, primarily the voluntary muscles, become progressively weaker. In the late stages of muscular dystrophy, muscle fibers often are replaced by fat and connective tissue. There are several types of muscular dystrophy. The various types of the disease affect more than 50,000 Americans. Many are associated with specific genetic abnormalities.The most common muscular dystrophies appear to be due to a genetic deficiency of the muscle protein dystrophin. These types of the disease are called dystrophinopathies. They include: Duchenne' ...
    Related: cerebral, cerebral palsy, dystrophy, muscular, muscular dystrophy
  • Alzheimers Disease - 1,259 words
    ... ors leading outside (Alzheimers disease sufferers are known to wander off); clearing floors of clutter; and reducing the contents of closets in order to simplify choices (Alzheimer, 1992, p.17). Costs are typically paid for by the victim's family. Many of these, and other more expensive modifications are introduced in long-term care settings. They help in maintaining the safety and security of the victim as well as reducing their confusion. The patient's and the family's condition should be assessed every six months (Alzheimer, 1992, p.21). In response to constantly changing needs, the aspects of care must be constantly modified. Other issues that usually arise during the care of the pat ...
    Related: alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, muscular dystrophy, long term care, alleviating
  • Creatine Has Been Around Forever Because It Is In Everything That We Eat, Such As Steak, Chicken, And Fish It Has Been Around - 1,328 words
    Creatine has been around forever because it is in everything that we eat, such as steak, chicken, and fish. It has been around in supplement form since the early 90s. Various professional, high school and collegiate athletes in the United States and all over the world use Creatine. Some big names in sports that are Creatine users include the likes of Shannon Sharpe of the Denver Broncos. (Behind the Lines: Espn). Others are Pete Sampras and the entire University of Nebraska Football Team. (http://www.espn.go.com/tennis/usopen99/news/1999/ 0907/44778.html). As well as those three examples, others that use Creatine are seventy five percent of the Denver Broncos and sixty percent of all major le ...
    Related: creatine, fish, amino acids, side effects, eaten
  • Florida State, First Impression - 1,374 words
    Florida State, First Impression Florida State, First Impression When I decided to come to Florida State, surprisingly enough it wasn't for the parties. I was actually excited about coming here and studying (don't ask me why). Every other school I looked at I judged them according to how much of a party school they were and what the girls looked like. Then I end up at the #1 party school with a 5:1 ratio of girls to guys. In fact when I came here I wasn't even planning on rushing a Fraternity. When I got here though it was a whole different story. I can remember the week before school started, walking down the hall of my dorm and seeing newspaper clippings on all the doors. After a few days I ...
    Related: florida, florida state, impression, older people, world report
  • Gene Therapy - 405 words
    Gene Therapy Gene Therapy is the insertion of a gene or genes into cells in order to provide a new set of instructions to those cells. Gene insertion can be used to correct an inherited genetic defect which is causing disease, to counter or correct the effects of a genetic mutation, or even to program a cell for an entirely new function or property. Genes are composed of molecules of deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA (see Nucleic Acids), and are usually located in the nucleus of cells. The instructions that direct the development of an organism are encoded within the genes. Some diseases such as cystic fibrosis are caused by an inherited genetic defect. Other diseases are caused by a miscoding o ...
    Related: gene, gene therapy, therapy, therapy treatment, national institute
  • Genetic Engineering - 1,177 words
    Genetic Engineering In todays world, people are learning a great deal in the rapidly growing and developing fields of science and technology. Almost Each day, an individual can see or hear about new discoveries and advances in these fields of study. One very common topic that has been in the news and social talk of all people recently is what us human beings will be able to do through the development of science and technology in the future. The most heated and controversial of these topics that I notice is in the field of genetic testing and engineering in humans. Many people have wondered about whether the manipulation of human cells is somehow contrary to the laws of nature or religion esp ...
    Related: engineering, genetic, genetic code, genetic engineering, genetic information, genetic research, genetic testing
  • Genetic Screening - 1,580 words
    Genetic Screening Genetic screening, also known as preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), is a newly emerging technology that has brought with it much controversy. PGD involves the in vitro fertilization of an embryo. The embryos are allowed to develop to a 6 to 10 cell stage, at which point one of the embryonic cells is removed from each embryo and the cellular DNA is analyzed for chromosomal abnormalities or genetic mutations (Botkin, 1998). In doing this, it can be determined which embryos will be most likely to implant and germinate successfully in the uterus. PGD is a complicated, technologically sophisticated process. It is a union of in vetro fertilization technology and molecular b ...
    Related: genetic, genetic screening, genetic testing, screening, colon cancer
  • Genetics - 1,777 words
    Genetics My Dearest Susan, I dont know how to write what I am about to write. There is no easy way to do this. I am not one to be able to put his feelings down on paper. You know that. I am sure you know what this is about. We have not been able to go more than 10 minutes together without bringing it up. I feel as if I need a break from the arguing. So I decided to write this letter. Rather than yell and get distraught, Ill let you read exactly how I feel and you can write me back, in response. I dont want our emotions to get in the way of us making such a monumental decision not only in our lives, but also especially in the life of our son, Michael. We need to base our final decision on med ...
    Related: genetics, muscular dystrophy, road ahead, attend college, recognition
  • Germ Line Gene Therapy - 1,549 words
    Germ Line Gene Therapy Whether it is referred to by its scientific term syngamy or by the general term conception, the moment a sperm cell unites with an egg cell stirs, both in the scientist and the layperson, much awe and reverence. It is the point at which a new and unique genome is created. To some it is the instant a new person comes into existence. Such a union has been repeated for billions of years since its advent in the first, simple organisms. It is a means by which evolution can exert its influence. When the genetic material of two individuals combine in sexual reproduction, any variations between the two inherited sets of genes may result in offspring that are more or less suite ...
    Related: gene, gene therapy, germ, therapy, society today
  • Human Cloning - 893 words
    Human Cloning Human Cloning ... Most people panic when they hear the words "Human Cloning". Crazy thoughts run through their heads, imaginations run wild. They think of the world being run over by a million little Hitler's. They think of people thinking exactly like one another, and that no person would be different. And for some reason because of cloning, the world, as we know it will cease to exist. Cloning to some people is even considered "evil." Most religious people believe that it is "Playing God", they think that mankind is not supposed to have this power. Cloning, however, is not a magical way of creating life. It is a scientific procedure that will save many lives, cure diseases an ...
    Related: cloning, cloning human cloning, human cloning, cystic fibrosis, tay sachs disease
  • Human Disease Research - 2,297 words
    Human Disease Research Human Disease IINTRODUCTION Human Disease, in medicine, any harmful change that interferes with the normal appearance, structure, or function of the body or any of its parts. Since time immemorial, disease has played a role in the history of societies. It has affected-and been affected by-economic conditions, wars, and natural disasters. Indeed, the impact of disease can be far greater than better-known calamities. An epidemic of influenza that swept the globe in 1918 killed between 20 million and 40 million people. Within a few months, more than 500,000 Americans died-more than were killed during World War I (1914-1918), World War II (1939-1945), the Korean War (1950- ...
    Related: alzheimer's disease, disease research, heart disease, human disease, huntington's disease, infectious disease, liver disease
  • Human Genome Project - 1,376 words
    Human Genome Project HUMAN GENOME PROJECT Adam and Eve were doomed for trying to be like god, this is the same damnation mankind is headed to. Everyone's dream is to have absolute power and control of everything. The genome project and DNA engineering gives man the ability to create life and customize life to his specific needs of likes. So how good is too good? Man's ability to make life or create perfect human beings so they can be in a state of Utopia will disturb the balance of nature. Every individual, every child born on earth is unique i it's own way, not only by looks but also by their character, their DNA. Changing this by producing two of the same kind, of which one is produced in ...
    Related: genome, genome project, human beings, human error, human evolution, human genome
  • I Have Finally Decided That I Should Tackle An Issue Of Grave Importance In The World Today That Issue Is Abortion You Have H - 1,025 words
    I have finally decided that I should tackle an issue of grave importance in the world today. That issue is abortion. You have heard the arguments from all sides I am sure. It is a personal choice. It is murder. It is something the government should have no place in. It is something the government should be involved in. It is something I can tolerate but I do not want my tax dollars going to fund it. What stand am I going to take on this issue? I am not sure I have a stance, all I have are questions and observations. In the following document, I shall attempt to share them with you. What is abortion? Well according to Merriam Webster's dictionary abortion is defined as follows: Main Entry: ab ...
    Related: abortion, grave, world today, heart attack, muscular dystrophy
  • Multiple Sclerosis - 2,166 words
    Multiple Sclerosis Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, often disabling disease that randomly attacks the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). The progress, severity and specific symptoms of the disease can not be predicted; symptoms may range from tingling and numbness to paralysis and blindness. MS is a devastating disease because people live with its unpredictable physical and emotional effects for the rest of their lives. MS is a well-known disease, but poorly understood. In the United States there are approximately 200 new cases diagnosed each week; MS is a common disease and not always caused by genetics. Therefore, I feel we all need to have a better understanding of this ...
    Related: multiple, multiple sclerosis, sclerosis, cystic fibrosis, central nervous
  • Music Therapy - 1,527 words
    Music Therapy Music Therapy During the past thirty years, concepts in the mental health profession have undergone continuous and dramatic changes. A relatively new type of therapy is musical therapy, which incorporates music into the healing process. Music therapy also is changing, and its concepts, procedures, and practices need constant reevaluation in order to meet new concepts of psychiatric treatment. The idea of music as a healing influence which could affect health and behavior is as least as old as the writings of Aristotle and Plato. The 20th century discipline began after World War I and World War II when community musicians of all types, both amateur and professional, went to Vete ...
    Related: american music, background music, music, music therapy, therapy
  • Nutritional Facts - 1,540 words
    Nutritional Facts The first nutritional "fact" most Americans learn is that iron builds strong and healthy bodies.1 The beef lobby, cereal manufacturers, bread makers, and drug companies have bombarded the public with iron being the cure-all for fatigue and "iron-poor blood." People have been mislead by drug companies pushing iron supplements and by old-fashioned ideas about iron, the magical nutrient of strength. Even the cartoons of the past pushed iron as the secret ingredient in Popeye's spinach. Television advertisements used to urge people to "perk" up their "tired" blood with a liquid iron supplement called Geritol, but the Geritol ad was illegal. The Federal Trade Commission began an ...
    Related: nutritional, human body, blood sugar, federal trade, violation
  • Psychology: Use Of Language - 1,225 words
    Psychology: Use Of Language Jennifer Mull Psychology Human speech makes possible the expression and communication of thoughts, needs, and emotions through vocalization in the form of words. It is a process whose specialized adaptations differentiate it from the mere making of sounds--a capacity humans share with most animals. In addition to the capacity for laryngeal production of sound (which some animals also possess), speech requires a resonance system for modulation and amplification of that sound and an articulation process for the shaping of that sound into the communally established word-symbols of meaning that constitute the language of a given culture. (Dean Edell) The use of langua ...
    Related: cerebral palsy, hearing loss, mental retardation, parental, dystrophy
  • Sensitive Chromosome Probes Recently Discovered By A University Of Toronto Geneticist Will Make It Easier To Detect Certain T - 714 words
    Sensitive chromosome probes recently discovered by a University of Toronto geneticist will make it easier to detect certain types of genetic and prenatal diseases, as well as being used to determine paternity and provide forensic evidence in criminal cases. Probes are short pieces of DNA which bind to, and actually pinpoint, particular sites on a chromosome. Because these new probes are actually repeated hundreds or thousands of time at a particular site, they are much more sensitive than previously available ones. Of the 23 pairs of human chromosomes, Dr. F.H. Willard has discovered repeated probes or markers for six plus the gender determining X and Y chromosomes. "What we're trying to dec ...
    Related: chromosome, detect, sensitive, toronto, pregnant women
  • Sudden Infant Death Syndrome - 1,809 words
    Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Imagine the thought of a mother going in to her childs room and kissing her baby good night. Expecting to hear the gentle breath of her baby all that she hears is silence. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is the sudden death of an infant under one year of age which remains unexplained after a thorough case investigation, including performance of a complete autopsy, examination of the death scene, and review of the clinical history (Willinger, et al., 1991). More children die of SIDS in a year that all who die of cancer, heart disease, pneumonia, child abuse, AIDS, cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy combined. Many researchers now believe that babies who die ...
    Related: infant, infant death syndrome, sudden, sudden infant death syndrome, syndrome
  • Tourettes Syndrome - 1,056 words
    Tourette's Syndrome What Makes Them Tic? Tourette's syndrome is a neurological disorder, which involves involuntary body movements or Tics. There are two types of Tics, motor/physical and vocal. This paper will cover many aspects of Tourette's syndrome; including the history of the disease, the discovered of the disease, the genetics involved with the disorder, the diagnosis of the disease, and the effects of the disease on families. George Gils de la Tourette's a French doctor and biologist discovered Tourette's syndrome in 1885 (Landau 21). He was observing patients with unexplained repetitive movements and could not find any preexisting condition that would cause these symptoms. After ext ...
    Related: syndrome, attention deficit disorder, deficit disorder, muscular dystrophy, prone
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