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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: multimedia encyclopedia

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  • Aids As An Invader - 1,827 words
    Aids As An Invader Acquired immune deficiency syndrome, also known as AIDS, is a silent invader. The first cases of this disease were reported in the early 1980s. AIDS is caused by the infection known as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which is a microscopic organism that can grow and multiply inside living cells. HIV attacks and disables the bodys immune system. The immune system is the system that usually fights off illnesses. When the immune system breaks down, a person with AIDS will develop life-threatening illnesses. (Flynn & Lound, 6) The invasion of the AIDS virus in an individuals body leaves the body open to an invasion by many other different infections, called opportunistic d ...
    Related: aids, western europe, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, saharan africa, infected
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 1,281 words
    ... r parents and teachers no longer sustain her. She is unable to acknowledge her sexual desires and may regard her developing woman's body as an alien invasion. Her fear of adult femininity may also be a fear of becoming like her mother. According to this theory, fasting restores a sense of order to her life by allowing her to exert control over herself and others. She is proud of her ability to lose weight, and self-imposed rules about food are a substitute for genuine independence. Some students of anorexia believe that these girls starve themselves to suppress or control feelings of emotional emptiness. They struggle for perfection to prove that they need not depend on others to tell th ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, nervosa, grolier multimedia encyclopedia, young woman
  • Anorexia Nervosa Is Refusal To Maintain Body Weight At Or Above A Minimally Normal Weight For Age And Height Intense Fear Of - 1,280 words
    ... ers no longer sustain her. She is unable to acknowledge her sexual desires and may regard her developing woman's body as an alien invasion. Her fear of adult femininity may also be a fear of becoming like her mother. According to this theory, fasting restores a sense of order to her life by allowing her to exert control over herself and others. She is proud of her ability to lose weight, and self-imposed rules about food are a substitute for genuine independence. Some students of anorexia believe that these girls starve themselves to suppress or control feelings of emotional emptiness. They struggle for perfection to prove that they need not depend on others to tell them who they are and ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, body weight, height, intense, lose weight, nervosa
  • Aztec Empire History - 1,461 words
    ... per class. Aztec society, like all complex societies, had different social classes. People at the top - nobles, high priests, and people important in the military and government - had lives of luxury, with fine houses, clothing, and jewelry. The largest class was made up of commoners, such as farmers, servants, and craftspeople. In Aztec society, commoners were organized into clans, or groups, made up of many different families. Each clan joined people together throughout their lives. Members of a clan all lived in the same district. Merchants formed yet another class in Aztec society, separate from the commoners. The Aztecs carried on a great deal of trade with other Indian nations. Tra ...
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  • Ben Franklin Biographycritique - 1,615 words
    ... del for the national character. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts on Jan. 17, 1706, into a religious Puritan household. His father, Josiah, was a candlemaker and a skillful mechanic. His mother, Abiah Bens parents raised thirteen children--the survivors of Josiahs seventeen children by two wives (#1). Printer & Writer Franklin left school at ten years old when he was pressed into his father's trade. At twelve Ben was apprenticed to his half brother James, a printer of The New England Courant. He generally absorbed the values and philosophy of the English Enlightenment. At the age of 16, Franklin wrote some pieces for the Courant signed Silence Dogood, in which he parodied the Boston a ...
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  • Business Tycoons In Us - 1,444 words
    ... y the experimenter in charge of the project. Then the group worked on it. It was impossible to give credit for an invention to any one person. The brilliant scientist was also a clever businessman. Edison wanted the streets of New York City torn up for the laying of electrical cables. So he invited the entire city council out to Menlo Park at dusk. The council members walked up a narrow staircase in the dark. As they stumbled in the dark, Edison clapped his hands. The lights came on. There in the dining hall was a feast catered by New York's best restaurant. Another great accomplishment of Edison was the invention of an entirely new way for businesses to work. Edison and his partners inv ...
    Related: business week, formal education, multimedia encyclopedia, united states steel, edition
  • Capital Punishment Is The Legal Infliction The Death Penalty - 1,329 words
    Capital punishment is the legal infliction the death penalty. It is obviously the most severe form of criminal punishment. (Bedau1) Capital punishment is a controversial way of dealing with violent criminals. The main alternative to the death penalty is life in prison. Capital punishment has been around for thousands of years as a means of eradicating criminals. A giant debate started between supporters and opposers of execution, over the morality and effectiveness of the death penalty. The supporters claim that if you take a life you should pay with your life or "an eye for an eye". Opposers of the death penalty bring up the chance of sentencing the innocent and how the death penalty is inh ...
    Related: capital punishment, criminal punishment, death penalty, death row, penalty, punishment
  • Censorship - 879 words
    Censorship Books The freedom to read is essential to the democratic way of life (Censorship News 1996). Today our freedom is under attack. Private groups such as mothers and public authorities everywhere are working to remove both books and periodicals from sale, to exclude certain books from public schools, to censor and silence magazines and newspapers, and to limit controversial books from the general public. The suppression of reading materials is suppression of creative thoughts. Books are not the only one that is being suppressed by pressure to the political and social systems. They are also being brought against the educational system, radios, internet, television and against the Thea ...
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  • Cold War - 1,247 words
    Cold War The Cold War With the aim of preventing East Germans from seeking asylum in the West, the East German government in 1961 began constructing a system of concrete and barbed-wire barriers between East and West Berlin. This Berlin Wall endured for nearly thirty years, a symbol not only of the division of Germany but of the larger conflict between the Communist and non-Communist worlds. The Wall ceased to be a barrier when East Germany ended restrictions on emigration in November 1989. The Wall was largely dismantled in the year preceding the reunification of Germany. The victorious Allies agreed to give most of Eastern Germany to Poland and the USSR, and then divide the rest into four ...
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  • Communism History - 1,343 words
    ... s, icy rivers, swampy marshes, and Kuomintang forces would leave only a handful alive at the end. The Long March had begun. It would end in 1949, the same time the Peoples Republic of China was formed. Mao had come out on top through extraordinary means. However, the civil war was not quite over. While living in Taiwan, Chiang was still getting backing from the United States and again took the title of President in 1950. Mao recognized, however, that he would need to set up a government immediately in order to support the close to a billion people living in China. He then turned to the Soviet Union for financial help. Mao went on to create the Great Cultural Revolution: an effort to get ...
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  • Communism In The American Education System - 1,428 words
    ... o schools for having children collect items like soup labels or sales receipts from certain stores have increased by 83%, and corporate-sponsored materials that claim to have some kind of instructional content have increased 963%. After factoring in a few other types of media propaganda, the overall propaganda increase between 1990 and 1999 was 303% (Molnar). The USSR also pioneered some interesting programs. One such program was a School to Work Act. In the 1958-1959 school year, the Soviet Union passed new reform laws that required all pupils in the three senior grades of the secondary schools to work in Soviet factories or farms for one-third of their school time (Noah). In other word ...
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  • Creation Vs Evolution, Was Man Created Be An Almighty God, Or Is He Simply A Product Of Modern Science This Question Has Puzz - 443 words
    Creation vs evolution, was man created be an almighty god, or is he simply a product of modern science. This question has puzzled scholarly minds for many years and yet will for many to come. The one that makes the most sense to me and has the most supporting evidence, is evolution. Not the normal, goop to fish to creature to monkey to man, obviously I skipped some, but one not so greatly known. It is called punctual equalibrium. Punctual equalibrium is a type of evolution stating that the evolution of man was in quick great changes caused by radiation from solar flares. These solar flares caused mutations. If this is the way not only man but all organisms were formed than it would explain a ...
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  • David Poursalimi - 390 words
    David Poursalimi 10-30-98 Per: 4 Charles A. Lindbergh Charles A. Lindbergh was born on February 4, 1902, in Detroit, and past away in 1974. Lindbergh was an aviator who made the first solo nonstop flight across the Atlantic Ocean on May 20-21, 1927. Other pilots had crossed the Atlantic before him. But Lindbergh was the first person to do it alone nonstop. Lindberghs flight suddenly brought him international fame. The press named him Lucky Lindy and the Lone Eagle. Americans and Europeans idolized the young man and honored him. The way this all started was that in 1919, a New York City hotel owner named Raymond Orteig offered $25,000 to the first aviator to fly nonstop from New York to Paris ...
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  • Dna Fingerprinting - 1,017 words
    Dna Fingerprinting DNA Fingerprinting DNA Fingerprinting is also referred to as DNA profiling and DNA typing. It was first developed as an identification technique in England in 1985. The original use was to expose the presence of any genetic diseases. About three years later it became used to identify criminals through the analysis of genetic material and to settle paternity disputes. It is still used for those reasons today. The DNA fingerprinting process is called gel electrophoresis. It is a process that can sort pieces of DNA according to its size. The process is done by taking samples of DNA from the crime scene and comparing it with samples from the accused. Samples are taken from bio ...
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  • Eating Disorders - 1,442 words
    Eating Disorders Did you know that 90% of women dislike the way they look? And its all because of the media and their emphasis on the ideal figure of a woman. Supermodels like Kate Moss and other Barbie-doll-figure-inspired women grace the cover of magazines all over the world promoting a perfect shape. Girls of all ages think that this is what people want to see. They think that this is what they should look like and try to set impossible goals for themselves to look like covergirls. As a result, many women in North America suffer from psychological illnesses. Among the most common are eating disorders such as Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa. Anorexia and Bulimia generally arise in young women ...
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  • Electric Cars - 1,506 words
    Electric Cars Electric Cars History: Early electric vehicles may have appeared as early as 1830. Scottish inventor Robert Davidson constructed the world's first prototype electric vehicle in 1837, but historians generally credit J.K. Starley, an English inventor, and Fred M. Kimball of Boston with building the first practical electric cars in 1888. Later in the in the decade, William Morrison of Des Moines, Iowa, constructed his version of the electric vehicle in 1891. His vehicle required 24 storage battery cells, took 10 hours to charge, and could run for 13 hours. It could carry up to 12 people and had a 4-horsepower motor. His car could reach speeds up to 14 miles per hour. Morrison, how ...
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  • Formula - 1,974 words
    ... e puncture-proof fuel cell. This fuel cell is designed to withstand a crash by deforming; this will reduce the chance of fire in a crash. The fuel cell is covered in Kevlar which is the same material used in bullet proof vests. This makes the fuel cell very strong. To absorb energy in a crash, the chassis is made of impact-absorbing body panels. These panels will crumple in a crash and absorb most of the energy. This same technology is now used on commercial passenger vehicles and is called a "crumple zone." In the event of a crash, the wheels of the car are designed to break off. This will make the car slide along the ground, making it slow down more quickly. This also helps to prevent ...
    Related: formula, engine technology, grand prix, walk away, operate
  • Galileo Galilei - 1,231 words
    Galileo Galilei Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) Galileo Galilei was born near Pisa, Italy, on February 15, 1564 (Drake). Galileo was the first child of Vincezio Galiei, a merchant and a musician (Jaki 289). In 1574, Galileos family moved from Pisa to Florence, where Galileo started his formal education (Jaki 289). Seven years latter, in 1581, Galileo entered the University of Pisa as a medical student (Drake). In 1583, home on vacation from medical school, Galileo began to study mathematics and physical sciences (Jaki 289). A Family friend and professor at the Academy of Design, Ostilio Ricci, worked on translating some of Archimedes, which Galileo read and became interested in. This is where Ga ...
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  • Henry Aaron - 802 words
    Henry Aaron Everybody knows that Henry Aaron holds the record for the most career homeruns. But most of them probably do not know that he also holds the record for the most career Runs Batted In (RBIs) with 2297. The reason is that this record is not as glamorous. Well, not everything about Hank Aaron was glamorous. He had to overcome great odds and work very hard to get where he is today. Henry Louis Aaron was born on February 5, 1934. Ironically, Aaron was born one day before Babe Ruth's birthday. This was right in the middle of the Great Depression. Because of the fact that it was the Great Depression, his father was lucky to bring home seventy five to eighty dollars per week. His childho ...
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  • Imperialism - 1,550 words
    Imperialism Throughout time more powerful countries have extended their influence over weaker countries and then colonized those countries to expand their own power. Imperialism causes the stronger countries to grow and become nations or even empires. There are many examples throughout European history of nations enveloping weaker countries and increasing their own wealth and power to form strong nation-states and even empires. Through imperialism one culture is invading another culture and most of the time the European colonialists are not thinking about the effects this invasion might have on the natives of that land. Problems caused by imperialism have prevailed to this day. Imperialism c ...
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