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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: associate professor

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  • 13 Were The Elizabethans More Bloodthirsty Or Tolerant Of - 1,210 words
    ... repulsiveness. His is a Dionysianism so passionately self-serving, so deliberate if not cold-blooded, that, corrosive rather than life-giving like the Dionysian at its best, it turns all not only to destruction but to cheapness, ignominy, pointlessness. -Theodore Weiss, The Breath of Clowns and Kings, 1974 - The great stories of murder are about men who could not have done it but who did. They are not murderers, they are men. And their stories will be better still when they are excellent men; not merely brilliant and admirable, but also, in portions of themselves which we infer rather than see. Richard is never quite human enough. The spectacle over which he presides with his bent back a ...
    Related: romeo and juliet, executive committee, the merchant of venice, artist, coriolanus
  • Albert Einstein - 1,216 words
    Albert Einstein Albert Einstein Albert Einstein was one of the greatest brains ever to come to the 20th century. Einstein contributed to the 20th century more than any other scientist ever. His theory of relativity is held as the highest quality of a human thought ever to come. Albert Einstein was born on March 14, 1879 in Ulm, Wurttemberg, Germany. His family moved from Ulm to Munich and had an unsuccessful business that made them move later to Milan, Italy. His parents were dealing with electrical apparatus. At this time Albert left his German citizenship. He persuades an exam that would give him the opportunity to study electrical engineering in Zurich Polytechnic but failed to pass it. A ...
    Related: albert, albert einstein, einstein, general relativity, secondary school
  • Albert Einstein - 1,498 words
    Albert Einstein Einsteins early life; Einstein was born in Ulm, Germany on Mar. 14, 1879. Einstein's parents, who were non observant Jews, moved from Ulm to Munich when Einstein was an infant. The family business was the manufacture of electrical parts. When the business failed, in 1894, the family moved to Milan, Italy. At this time Einstein decided officially to relinquish his German citizenship. Within a year, still without having completed secondary school, Einstein failed an examination that would have allowed him to take a course of study leading to a diploma as an electrical engineer at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. He spent the next year in nearby Aarau at the continual ...
    Related: albert, albert einstein, einstein, early life, white house
  • Albert Einstien - 1,742 words
    Albert Einstien Men and Women of Science Albert Einstein Early Life Einstein was born in Ulm, Germany on Mar. 14, 1879. Einstein's parents, who were non observant Jews, moved from Ulm to Munich, Germany when Einstein was an infant. The family business was the manufacture of electrical parts. When the business failed, in 1894, the family moved to Milan, Italy. At this time Einstein decided officially to end his German citizenship. Within a year, still without having completed secondary school, Einstein failed an examination that would have allowed him to pursue a course of study leading to a diploma as an electrical engineer at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. He spent the next year ...
    Related: albert, albert einstein, men and women, theoretical physics, slightly
  • Cancer - 668 words
    Cancer Good morning ladies and gentlemen, my colleagues and I have called you in at such short notice because we need to discuss a patient who was brought to our attention earlier this week. The patient presented with rapidly progressing lymphadenopathy, subsequent examination lymph nodes congested with many small B-lymphocytes. The B-lymphocytes showed a significant chromosomal aberration in the form a 14;18 translocation. The patient has been diagnosed with lymphoma and has been prescribed an immediate course of chemotherapy. This mornings presentation will include a short description of the cell cycle and how and where certain checkpoints of genomic integrity function. My colleagues Assoc ...
    Related: cancer, good morning, protein synthesis, cell division, mutation
  • Chimpanzees - 803 words
    Chimpanzees A new study has shown that chimpanzees may be able to determine whether their partners know they are in danger. This suggests that these primates are able to decide how ignorant or informed their peers are about an unexpected situation. The finding, made by a team of researchers at Ohio State University's Comparative Cognition Project, suggests that chimps share with humans the ability to perceive the knowledge state of a peer, and perhaps the intention to protect that peer. Earlier experiments with both rhesus and Japanese macaque monkeys failed to show the same abilities in those animals. These new results strengthen the argument that in some ways, chimpanzees are closer to hum ...
    Related: ohio state, national institute, american psychological, couldn, prediction
  • Colgate In Argentina - 2,238 words
    Colgate In Argentina Introduction Colgate was founded in the United States in 1806 and for the first 100 years, its business focus was only there. However, in the very early 1900's, the Company began a very aggressive expansion program that led to the establishment of Colgate operations throughout the world. Today, Colgate-Palmolive is a $9 billion company, marketing its products in over 200 countries and territories under such internationally recognized brand names as Colgate, Palmolive, Ajax, Fab, and Mennen as well as Hill's Science Diet and Hill's Prescription Diet. Colgate Total is considered the greatest evolution in toothpaste since the introduction of fluoride. This highly effective ...
    Related: argentina, colgate, development strategies, urban areas, performing
  • Corbeill Political Humor In The Late Roman Republic - 1,232 words
    Corbeill - Political Humor In The Late Roman Republic Anthony Corbeill. Controlling Laughter: Political Humor in the Late Roman Republic. Anthony Corbeill is an Associate Professor of Classics, and holds a degree in Classical Languages and Literature from the University of Michigan and the University of California, Berkeley. Professor Corbeill teaches Greek and Latin at all levels, Roman Civlilization, and Greek and Roman Mythology. He is a member of the American Philological Association, the American Classical League, and the Society of Fellows of the American Academy in Rome. Controlling Laughter is a well-organized study which utilizes an original approach to a significant topic. Corbeill ...
    Related: greek and roman mythology, humor, political history, republic, roman, roman mythology, roman republic
  • Creatine Monohydrate - 1,278 words
    Creatine Monohydrate Everyday a new nutrition supplement or a new diet is introduced to the public. In recent years and months, many people have started to take a larger interest in their personal health and exercise. Creatine Monohydrate is still the most popular and controversial nutrition supplement on the market today. This paper will include a background for creatine monohydrate because not everyone knows what it is. The paper will also include information and criticisms from a recent nutritional article on creatine monohydrate that was researched for this paper. Creatine monohydrate was introduced to the public approximately two years ago. When it first came out on the market it made a ...
    Related: creatine, associate professor, short term, amino acids, overview
  • Hindu Revival In America - 2,214 words
    Hindu Revival In America Hindu Revival In An Alien Land. America is coming alive with the sounds and images of Hinduism. From Ras and Garbha dances during Navratri in Chicago and Edison to Diwali fireworks in Manhattan's South Street Seaport; from the sounds of conches and the chanting of hymnals at temple ceremonies in Pittsburgh and Flushing to the consecration of new dieties at the Balaji Temple in Bridgewater, N.J., and the foundation-laying ceremony for a new Shree Raseshwari temple in Austin, Texas; from the modest get-togethers of the devout before a makeshift alter in a three-car garage in Glen Mills, Pa., to mini-culfests in Atlanta and New York University, the American landscape th ...
    Related: america, hindu, revival, material culture, york city
  • Into The Time Warp: The Rocky Horror Picture Show As An Enduring Pop Cult Classic - 1,033 words
    ... cinematic parody and critique, touching upon subjects such as heterosexual romance, sexual stereotypes and identifications, and in general, middle American morality (Katovich and Kinkade 199). The films opening song Science Fiction Double Feature, pays tribute to many of these themes and not only sets up the entire plot of the movie, but also the humorous mood of the film. Dr. James B. Twitchell, professor of English and advertising at the University of Florida, maintains that the certain horror element, which is satirized in RHPS, is what has made Rocky Horror such a successful cult film: Just as Young Frankenstein pokes fun at the Universal Frankensteins in what is really an affectiona ...
    Related: classic, cult, enduring, horror, horror films, rocky
  • Johnson Behavioral System Jbs Model - 1,159 words
    Johnson Behavioral System (JBS) Model In this paper, I am going to summarize the Johnson Behavioral System (JBS) Model (Johnson, 1980, 1990), explain the perspectives for nursing practice, and explore its applicability in nursing practice. First, I am going to talk a little about Dorothy E. Johnson the nurse that wrote the Model. Dorothy E. Johnson was born August 21, 1919, in Savannah, Georgia (Lobo, 1995). She received her A.A. from Armstrong Junior College in Savannah, Georgia, in 1938; her B.S.N. from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, in 1942; and her M.P.H. from Harvard University in Boston in 1948 (Conner, Harbour, Magers, and Watt 1994). Johnson was an instructor and an a ...
    Related: behavioral, johnson, system theory, knowledge base, medical college
  • Known As The Father Of Psychology, Freud Developed Many Of The First Theories Of Modern Physiology His Ideas And Concepts Wil - 994 words
    Known as the "father of psychology," Freud developed many of the first theories of modern physiology. His ideas and concepts will continue to be studied through the years. He put forth many new concepts about sexuality, consciousness, unconsciousness and instincts. He spent his whole life devoted to discovering the secrets of the human nature. Personally I think this guy was weird. Sigmund Freud was born on May 6, 1856 in Freiburg. The town of Freiburg later became Pribor and was eventually absorbed into the modern state of Czechoslovakia. Freuds father, name Jakob Freud was a Jewish wool merchant. Freuds mother Amalie Nathanson was from Galicia. She was Jakobs second wife. Sigmund had eight ...
    Related: freud, modern state, physiology, sigmund freud, early years
  • Lockouttagout - 1,340 words
    Lockout/Tagout It is a hot day in the middle of July, and there is a brother and sister impatiently waiting while their mother finishes packing for their trip to Disneyworld. This is their father's last day to work before his vacation starts. Their father is an air conditioning technician, and this morning he was called out to a movie theater to work on an air conditioning unit. This particular unit is located on the roof of the theater. It had been raining the day before; on the roof around the unit water is standing where he is going to have to work. In checking the unit out, he finds electrical problems that require him to shut the power off to the unit. He looks for the disconnect at the ...
    Related: health administration, national institute, vice president, ohio, injury
  • Martha Ballard - 1,803 words
    Martha Ballard We as a society are fortunate. We have the luxury of advanced technology to include: computers, telephones, video teleconferencing equipment, cellular phones, beepers, and hospitals with the latest gadgets and gizmos. Our technology is available only because of documented historical accounts. Our idea of work is having to get in our vehicles and driving to our destination and sometimes sitting behind a desk all day to push paper; the worst any of us suffers is a traffic jam here or there or worse, a construction site. Imagine life in the late eighteenth century. People in this era had to deal with not only getting up at dawn to milk the cows, but toiling for hours on end with ...
    Related: ballard, martha, associate professor, national endowment, practical
  • Mary Whiton Calkins - 1,236 words
    ... t considered. RESEARCH & ACHIEVEMENTS In 1895, Calkins returned to Wellesley College where she was made an Associate Professor of Psychology and Philosophy and was promoted to Professor in 1898. She wrote hundreds of papers divided between the two disciplines. Calkins' writings encompass more than a hundred papers in professional journals of psychology and philosophy. She wrote four books, including, An Introduction to Psychology (1901); The Persistent Problems of Philosophy (1907), which went through five editions; and The Good Man and the Good (1918). Throughout this period Calkins did work in both the fields of psychology and philosophy. For example, in the same year she published an ...
    Related: calkins, mary, right to vote, associate professor, harvard
  • Myopic Little Men In Tuxedos, Or Highly Efficient Landwater Animals Recent Research Indicates Theres More To Penguins Than Me - 1,032 words
    Myopic little men in tuxedos, or highly efficient land/water animals? Recent research indicates there's more to penguins than meets the eye. If you've every wondered what it would be like to be able to see as clearly under water as you can on land, just ask the nearest penguin.Most aquatic animals are short-sighted on land. Most terrestrial animals (and that includes us) are far-sighted under water. But researchers have discovered that penguins can apparently see equally well in both environments, because of the unique structure of their eyes. Penguins have to be able to see well under water because their diet consists mainly of plankton, molluscs, crustaceans, and the inevitable fish. Throu ...
    Related: efficient, large numbers, associate professor, information services, chase
  • Neanderthals Are Not Our Ancestors - 792 words
    Neanderthals Are Not Our Ancestors 7-11-97 University Park, Pa. -- A team of U.S. and German researchers has extracted mitochondrial DNA from Neandertal bone showing that the Neandertal DNA sequence falls outside the normal variation of modern humans. These results indicate that Neandertals did not contribute mitochondrial DNA to modern humans, says Dr. Mark Stoneking, associate professor of anthropology at Penn State. Neandertals are not our ancestors. The research also reaffirms the origins of modern humans in Africa. Reporting in today's (July 11) issue of the journal Cell, the researchers detail their methods and the results of analysis of Neandertal mitochondrial DNA. The research team ...
    Related: ancestors, graduate student, mitochondrial dna, liberal arts, sequence
  • Penguins - 1,043 words
    Penguins ================================================== Penguins: the eyes have it! LIFE SCIENCES -------------------------------------------------- Myopic little men in tuxedos, or highly efficient land/water animals? Recent research indicates there's more to penguins than meets the eye. If you've every wondered what it would be like to be able to see as clearly under water as you can on land, just ask the nearest penguin.Most aquatic animals are short-sighted on land. Most terrestrial animals (and that includes us) are far-sighted under water. But researchers have discovered that penguins can apparently see equally well in both environments, because of the unique structure of their eye ...
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  • Penguins - 1,033 words
    Penguins Myopic little men in tuxedos, or highly efficient land/water animals? Recent research indicates there's more to penguins than meets the eye. If you've every wondered what it would be like to be able to see as clearly under water as you can on land, just ask the nearest penguin.Most aquatic animals are short-sighted on land. Most terrestrial animals (and that includes us) are far-sighted under water. But researchers have discovered that penguins can apparently see equally well in both environments, because of the unique structure of their eyes. Penguins have to be able to see well under water because their diet consists mainly of plankton, molluscs, crustaceans, and the inevitable fi ...
    Related: large numbers, cornell university, methods used, species, seal
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