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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: moral responsibility

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  • Abortion Ethics - 1,399 words
    Abortion Ethics On the question of abortion being moral, the answer is clearly that terminating a fetus' life under certain circumstances is not only moral, but it is also our responsibility to terminate it if the quality of life is in question for the fetus. A second major reason is that to declare abortion immoral would mean that we would have to consider the factor of how the conception came about. This cannot and should not be done. Quality is a major factor in the question of the morality of abortion. When parents decide to keep or not keep a baby the issue of adoption does not play into this. The reason for this is that once the baby is born that the parents may change their mind if th ...
    Related: abortion, ethics, morality of abortion, point of view, human life
  • Abortion Prolife View - 1,104 words
    ... oved by God who has a distinct plan for their lives. It denies the child the right to live and society the privilege of the childs gift and contributions to the world. "God hears the new life in the womb, the heart within the heart, the anguish cry of hostage child sobbing in the dark." Many times after having an abortion, a woman will become emotionally unstable. Post-abortion syndrome describes the trauma of the woman who finally feels guilty, understands the repercussions of her actions, and regrets her previous decision. Statistics show that 92% feel less in touch with their emotions or feel a need to suppress their emotions. 82% had greater feelings of loneliness or isolation and 86 ...
    Related: abortion, human nature, moral responsibility, senate judiciary committee, rage
  • Abortion Prolife View - 1,093 words
    ... the right to live and society the privilege of the childs gift and contributions to the world. God hears the new life in the womb, the heart within the heart, the anguish cry of hostage child sobbing in the dark. Many times after having an abortion, a woman will become emotionally unstable. Post-abortion syndrome describes the trauma of the woman who finally feels guilty, understands the repercussions of her actions, and regrets her previous decision. Statistics show that 92% feel less in touch with their emotions or feel a need to suppress their emotions. 82% had greater feelings of loneliness or isolation and 86% had increased tendency toward anger or rage. 53% increased or began use ...
    Related: abortion, online available, united states senate, pro-life movement, minute
  • Alice In Wonderland - 1,801 words
    Alice In Wonderland Finding the Child in Us All Lewis Carroll's classic Alice's Adventures in Wonderland has entertained not only children but adults for over one hundred years. The tale has become a treasure of philosophers, literary critics, psychoanalysts, and linguists. It also has attracted Carroll's fellow mathematicians and logicians. There appears to be something in Alice for everyone, and there are almost as many explanations of the work as there are commentators. It may be perhaps Carroll's fantastical style of writing that entertains the reader, rather than teaching them a lesson as was customary in his time. Heavy literary symbolism is difficult to trace through his works because ...
    Related: alice, alice in wonderland, wonderland, nineteenth century, young adult
  • Allegory Of Cave Not Essaylots Of Info - 2,868 words
    ... SS. HE COULD NOT UNDER THESE CIRCUMSTANCES COMPETE VERY EFFECTIVELY WITH THE OTHER PRISONERS IN MAKING OUT THE SHADOWS ON THE WALL. WHILE HIS EYESIGHT WAS STILL DIM AND UNSTEADY, THOSE WHO HAD THEIR PERMANENT RESIDENCE IN THE DARKNESS COULD WIN EVERY ROUND OF COMPETITION WITH HIM. THEY WOULD AT FIRST FIND THIS SITUATION VERY AMUSING AND WOULD TAUNT HIM BY SAYING THAT HIS SIGHT WAS PERFECTLY ALL RIGHT BEFORE HE WENT UP OUT OF THE CAVE AND THAT NOW HE HAS RETURNED WITH HIS SIGHT RUINED. THEIR CONCLUSION WOULD BE THAT IT IS NOT WORTH TRYING TO GO UP OUT OF THE CAVE. INDEED, SAYS PLATO IF THEY COULD LAY HANDS ON THE MAN WHO WAS TRYING TO SET THEM FREE AND LEAD THEM UP THEY WOULD KILL HIM. MO ...
    Related: allegory, allegory of the cave, cave, info, human beings
  • Anna Karenina - 1,503 words
    Anna Karenina The world of Tolstoy's Anna Karenina is a world ruled by chance. From the very opening chapters, where a watchman is accidentally run over by a train at Moscow's Petersburg station, to the final, climactic scenes of arbitrary destruction when Levin searches for Kitty in a forest beset by lightning, characters are brought together and forced into action against their will by coincidence and, sometimes, misfortune. That Anna and Vronsky ever meet and begin the fateful affair that becomes the centerpiece of the novel is itself a consequence of a long chain of unrelated events: culminating Anna's sharing a berth with Vronsky's mother on her way to reconcile Dolly and Stiva in Mosco ...
    Related: anna, anna karenina, karenina, immanuel kant, book of deuteronomy
  • Awakening And Suicide - 757 words
    Awakening And Suicide What is suicide? "(Suicide is) the act of self-destruction by a person sound in mind and capable of measuring his (or her) moral responsibility" (Webster 1705). "No one really knows why human beings commit suicide. Indeed, the very person who takes his (or her) own life may be least aware at the moment of decision of the essence of his (or her) reasons and emotions for doing so. At the outset, it can be said that a dozen individuals can kill themselves and "do" (or commit) 12 psychologically different deeds" (Encyclopaedia Britannica, 385). Suicide is written about in a variety of novels, short stories, and movies. Suicide moves like an undercurrent in the sea of themes ...
    Related: awakening, suicide, the awakening, encyclopaedia britannica, sylvan barnet
  • Beyond The Problem Of Evil - 3,962 words
    ... is caught in his illusion of volition . . . [This illusion], his assumption that free will exists, is also part of the calculable mechanism ( 106). When a misfortune strikes, we can overcome it either by removing its cause or else by changing the effect it has on our feelings . . .( 108). There are elements in each of these texts--e.g., the denial of free will, the rejection of the idea retributive justice, and the recognition of possibility of overcoming our emotional reactions rather than our external environment--which resonate with the sympathetic reader of Spinoza. And while, in later years, Nietzsche loses some of his positivistic fervor, we shall see that significant similarities ...
    Related: good and evil, spoke zarathustra, heavenly father, c. s. lewis, attain
  • Captial Punisment - 1,458 words
    ... he exact same category of offense - in other words, cost comparisons are valid only if you compare the cost of death penalty cases to the equivalent life without parole cases. But the cost for justice does not have to be so high for the execution of murderers. If we only allowed appeals that are relevant in proving ones innocence and eliminated the many more that are used merely as delaying tactics, it would save millions in taxpayers dollars. Abolitionists claim that the death penalty is unconstitutional by quoting the eighth amendment which forbids cruel and unusual punishment. But cruel and unusual was never defined by our founding fathers. So where does the Supreme Court stand on the ...
    Related: social policy, human life, united states senate, penal, joann
  • Child Abuse - 550 words
    Child Abuse Child Abuse Child Abuse is behavior by and adult that harms a childs physical, mental, or emotional health and development. Some types of child abuse are neglect, and physical abuse. An example of neglect would be medical neglect. This is where the child does not get the proper medical attention needed. Some examples of physical abuse would be sexual and physiological. The American Humane Society estimates that nearly 34 out of every 1,000 American children are abused in some way. Most children are too afraid to admit they have been abused; in fact, less than 20 percent of the cases reported were reported by the child being abused. The number one cause of child abuse is stress. T ...
    Related: abuse, child abuse, physical abuse, american children, single parent
  • Civil Rights And Disobedience - 1,630 words
    Civil Rights And Disobedience By acting civil but disobedient you are able to protest things you dont think are fair, non-violently. Henry David Thoreau is one of the most important literary figures of the nineteenth century. Thoreaus essay "Civil Disobedience," which was written as a speech, has been used by many great thinkers such as Martin Luther King Jr. and Mahatma Ghandi as a map to fight against injustice. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was a pastor that headed the Civil Rights movement. He was a gifted speaker and a powerful writer whose philosophy was non-violent but direct action. Dr.Kings strategy was to have sit-ins, boycotts, and marches. Dr. Kings "Letter from Birmingham Jail" was ...
    Related: civil disobedience, civil rights, civil rights movement, disobedience, individual rights, rights movement
  • Controlling Immigration To The Us - 958 words
    Controlling Immigration to the U.S. With the many different groups of people coming to this country in search of a better life, we should cut back on who we should allow to have citizenship. There are thousands of immigrants coming to the U.S. every day. A lot of these immigrants are illegal aliens coming to the U.S. to find jobs. Whenever we catch illegals crossing our borders, we should send them right back and that would be the end of the story. Instead we are bringing them to camps to wait until the government finds out what to do with them. With so many immigrants coming over everyday, the U.S. lets people out of these camps and let them into our society so we can fit the new people who ...
    Related: controlling, immigration, main problem, state department, romano
  • Crito, Socrates And Plato - 778 words
    Crito, Socrates And Plato Crito, as reported by Plato, is an account by where Crito is attempting to influence Socrates that it is just to escape from prison to avoid certain death by execution. Socrates' argument directly relates to the laws of the state and the role of the individual within it. The Crito exhibits the character of Socrates as a good citizen, who being unjustly condemned is willing to give up his life in obedience to the laws of the State. This report will discuss the major elements in Socrates' argument, regarding the injury and injustice he would cause by escaping from prison prior to his execution. Further discussion will be centered around Socrates' ability to maintain t ...
    Related: crito socrates, plato, socrates, point of view, public opinion
  • Ethics And Organizational Development - 1,884 words
    Ethics And Organizational Development For many organisations 'ethics' is something to be defined and managed by senior executives. Consider the arguments for and against this control-oriented position. In today's world it is all too prevalent to see more and more people hungry to gain success at an ever-increasing rate. Modern culture can and indeed is labelled 'greedy' and 'thoughtless'. Through my relatively short time spent in business, I have encountered many of these types of people. But who are they hungry for? Who benefits from their thoughtlessness, and why do they do what they do? More importantly, who is to blame when things don't go according to plan? These are all questions asked ...
    Related: code of ethics, ethics, organizational, business world, best approach
  • Free Will - 803 words
    Free Will Do I have Free Will? After considering the evidence for the three views I have concluded that soft determinism is best supported. I will be arguing for soft determinism with evidence presented in the class readings. I will start out with the evidence of unconscious motivation. It is the unconscious that forces us to act out things we think are justifiable but can actually be hurtful. With the three factors of our unconscious state, the ID, super-ego and the unconscious ego, we tend to be in a tug-of-war with our mind over who has control. With the mind being in the unconscious state we tend to make compromises in our actions. With the unconscious working, we have the freedom of fre ...
    Related: free will, moral responsibility, point of view, little pieces, libertarian
  • Government Contracts - 1,170 words
    Government Contracts From a business perspective, working under government contracts can be a very lucrative proposition. In general, a stream of orders keep coming in, revenue increases and the company grows in the aggregate. The obvious downfalls to working in this manner is both higher quality expected as well as the extensive research and documentation required for government contracts. If a part fails to perform correctly it can cause minor glitches as well as problems that can carry serious repercussions, such as in the National Semiconductor case. When both the culpable component and company are found, the question arises of how extensive these repercussions should be. Is the company ...
    Related: contracts, corporate responsibility, business law, moral responsibility, chain
  • Government Contracts - 1,152 words
    ... their employment duties and they all should have been aware of which parts were intended for government use. Ambiguity is not an excusing factor of moral responsibility for the workers. Also, the fact that some employees failed to act in an ethical manner gives even more moral responsibility to that employee. While some are definitely more morally responsible than others, every employee has some burden of weight in this case. In fact, when the government reached a final resolution, they decided to further impose repercussions and certain employees of National Semiconductor were banned from future work in any government office (Velazquez, 54). Looking at the case from the standpoint of N ...
    Related: contracts, york times, local community, social impact, employee
  • Great Gatsby Characters Description - 788 words
    Great Gatsby Characters Description In the book, The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald, certain characters developed so that they contradict another character personality traits. This setup allows the characteristics of these two characters to be greatly notice by the readers. In this case, the development of Nick and Gatsby are a contradiction of each other: on one hand there is Nick who develops greatly through the story and on the other hand there is Gatsby, a man caught up in the corruptions of his own life. Lets study these two different characters. Unlike Nick, Gatsby does not develop in the course of the story. He cannot because his whole life is devoted to the fulfillment of a rom ...
    Related: gatsby, great gatsby, the great gatsby, f. scott fitzgerald, moral responsibility
  • Great Gatsby Evaluation - 803 words
    Great Gatsby Evaluation Throughout the course of any literary work many of the characters go though some sort of a change. These changes maybe life lessons which are necessary to obtain in life. These lessons include undergoing a development of responsibility or morality. In The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Nick Carraway is a character that develops a sense of moral responsibility throughout the novel. This novel opens in the summer of 1922 in West Egg, Long Island. The main character, Nick Carraway moves to Long Island to begin his career in the bond business. It is here where his cousin Daisy Buchanan lives with her husband Tom. Nick also meets his wealthy neighbor when Jay Gatsby ...
    Related: evaluation, gatsby, great gatsby, jay gatsby, the great gatsby
  • Hal Is Not Guilty - 1,266 words
    Hal Is Not Guilty In a court of law, killing while mentally disabled, killing under orders and killing in self-defense are sufficient justifications for taking anothers life. With this in mind, was HAL justified in killing the crewmembers of the discovery, or were Hals actions murderous and should he be brought to trial? Can Hal be blamed? The computer basically has 3 excuses for killing the crewmembers of the Discovery. First, Hal was disabled. Second, Hal was killing under orders. Lastly, Hal was killing in self-defense. In absence of free moral will, there cannot be moral responsibility. This is a point argued in Dr. Helms class lecture. I assert that Hal did not have free moral will, bec ...
    Related: emotional intelligence, human error, space shuttle, machine, creature
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