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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: moral obligation

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  • Abortion - 1,138 words
    Abortion Abortion has been one of the topics of hot debate for the last three decades in our nation. Since the Roe v/s Wade decision in 1973, some Americans feel the need to ponder whether aborting fetuses is a moral action. On the one hand, some people feel that abortion should be legal because a woman has a right to choose whether she wants to continue a pregnancy or not. It's her body. On the other hand, some feel that fetuses have no advocates and deserve a right to live, so it is immoral to abandon their rights and kill them. This issue is not only at the center of political debate, but philosophical debate as well. In this paper, I will examine and critique Mary Anne Warren's On the Mo ...
    Related: abortion, hierarchy of needs, moral status, right to life, personhood
  • Affirmative Action - 1,025 words
    Affirmative Action The idea that different subcategories of humans exist, and that depending on one's point of view, some subcategories are inherently inferior to others, has been around since ancient times. This concept eventually gained the label of "race" in 1789, a "zoological term... generally defined as a subcategory of a species which inherits certain physical characteristics that distinguish it from other categories of that same species." (Tivnan 181). Although slavery has been by and large eliminated in virtually every part of the modern world, the concept used to rationalize its implementation, "racism", still plagues most modern cultures. Races that were once enslaved, or are mino ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, education system, equal rights, inherently
  • Aldo Leopold Ecocentrism - 779 words
    Aldo Leopold- Ecocentrism Environmental Ethics 1) Leopold strongly suggests the need for land ethic because he sees a great lack for it. Humans see land as an economical resource. Land is used for our needs and enjoyment with the belief that we are the ruler and conqueror of the land. Humans feel superior to the land and all that live on it and therefore lack the sense of being a part of land. To have land ethic is to become a part of the land not a disconnected from it. When we separate ourselves from the land, we forget our obligation to take care of it. We use, abuse, and take land for granted. We are the ultimate consumers of land. Leopold suggests that adopting land ethic will change th ...
    Related: aldo, aldo leopold, leopold, human nature, strongly agree
  • Andrew Carnegie - 1,141 words
    Andrew Carnegie Andrew Carnegie Essay written by A man of Scotland, a distinguished citizen of the United States, and a philanthropist devoted to the betterment of the world around him, Andrew Carnegie became famous at the turn of the twentieth century and became a real life rags to riches story. Born in Dunfermline, Scotland, on November 25, 1835, Andrew Carnegie entered the world in poverty. The son of a hand weaver, Carnegie received his only formal education during the short time between his birth and his move to the United States. When steam machinery for weaving came into use, Carnegies father sold his looms and household goods, sailing to America with his wife and two sons. At this t ...
    Related: andrew, andrew carnegie, carnegie, carnegie hall, carnegie steel
  • Animal Rights Vs Human Rights - 1,858 words
    Animal Rights Vs. Human Rights h Laboratory animals The use of laboratory animals is important to three main areas: biomedical research, product safety testing, and education. Biomedical researchers use animals to extend their understanding of the workings of the body and the processes of disease and health, and to develop new vaccines and treatments for various diseases. The research these people do isnt only for human benefit; it is also helping to develop veterinary techniques. The industry uses animals to test the effectiveness and safety of many consumer products, such as cosmetics, household cleaning products, pesticides, chemicals, and drugs. Educators, from elementary school all the ...
    Related: animal abuse, animal experimentation, animal research, animal rights, animal testing, animal welfare, human health
  • Approaches To Environmental Ethics And Kants Principle - 979 words
    Approaches To Environmental Ethics And KantS Principle 1. All of the three approaches to environmental ethics use Kant's principle to various extents. The differences between them lie in their individual definitions of moral categories. It's like looking at the same slide under three different powers on a microscope. Each approach relies on Kant's principle to protect the interest of that which they deem worthy. Baxter's anthropocentric approach clearly states that our obligations regarding the environment are to be determined solely on the basis of human interests. Our welfare depends on breathable air, drinkable water and edible food. Thus, polluting the environment to the extent that it d ...
    Related: approaches, environmental, environmental ethics, ethics, intrinsic value
  • Approaches To Environmental Ethics And Kants Principle - 1,026 words
    ... sent state of world hunger. First, the Commission claims there is a "moral obligation to overcome hunger, based on two universal values - respect for human dignity and social justice." (396) In the hierarchy of human needs, food is one of the most basic of all, along with air, water and shelter. If these fundamental requirements for life are not met, then higher level needs seem almost to be luxuries and unimportant. Unless all governments of the world actively strive to see that hunger is a tragedy of the past, "the principle that human life is sacred, which forms the very basis of human society, will gradually but relentlessly erode." (397) The Commission believes the US would be the s ...
    Related: approaches, environmental, environmental ethics, ethics, moral obligation
  • Bail Bonds - 1,890 words
    Bail Bonds Criminal Law term paper 17OCT00 Bail Bonds The principle of bail is basic to our system of justice and its practice as old as English law itself. When the administration of criminal justice was in its infancy, arrest for serious crime meant imprisonment without preliminary hearing and long periods of time could occur between apprehension and the arrival of the King's Justices to hold court. It was therefore a matter of utmost importance to a person under arrest to be able to obtain a provisional release from custody until his case was called. This was also the desideratum of the medieval sheriff, the representative of the Crown in criminal matters, who wore many hats including tha ...
    Related: bail, public policy, term paper, court case, prisoners
  • Carosellis The Language Of Leadership - 1,096 words
    Caroselli's "The Language of Leadership" By: Dr. Marlene Caroselli Leadership is demonstrated by words or actions. A effective leader will possess excellent communication skills through the use of language. "The language of power must be used to make things happen, to coalesce people and purpose for the ultimate good of the organization." (Caroselli 1990, 34) In the book, "The Language of Leadership", the author Dr. Marlene Caroselli states that our language is used to communicate, whether it be verbally or non verbally (communicating with our bodies). She believes that for a person to demonstrate powerful leadership, he or she must hold the knowledge and know the power of language in the co ...
    Related: leadership, leadership skills, effective leader, first bank, excellence
  • Collective Bargaining - 1,232 words
    ... al value of those wages dropped. It was during the era of the National Wage Agreements that inflation rose to 20%, days lost through strikes increased and unofficial strikes increased (Gunnigle et al, 1995). Although this may seem that this type of collective bargaining had a bad social influence, it must be noted that the OPEC recessions of the 1970's would have had been a contributing factor to all of the above. In 1987 the government, trade unions and the FUE negotiated the PNR. Other than the provisions for pay increases, social issues were taken into consideration: 'The programme was to cover the period up to the end of 1990 and entailed the following provisions: -The creation of a ...
    Related: bargaining, collective, collective bargaining, social aspects, social welfare
  • Conceptions Of Divorce - 1,194 words
    Conceptions Of Divorce Conceptions of Divorce Is marriage no more than the result of voluntary agreements between two private individuals? Is the lack of detail concerning marriage arrangements causing all the divorce debates? Does divorce cause problems or solve them? Why is marriage such a religious experience and divorce such a legal experience? Why do marriages take place under the eyes of God while divorces take place under the eyes of the law? I believe that it was because of my parents' divorce that I have chosen to tackle such a controversial topic. In many ways, I am in search of my own opinion. My parents divorced through the no-fault system. My dad decided it was time to move on t ...
    Related: divorce, divorce laws, marriage divorce, marriage and family, different ways
  • Consequentialism And Deontology - 1,351 words
    Consequentialism And Deontology The moral obligation to ones spouse is very important. If a person vows to love, honor and cherish until death do them part, then this before God and all who witness that to be true. If the actions of one or the other cause a"rift" in the relationship then this could be the beginning of the end of a marriage. From a consequential point of view, the person knew what he or she was doing and also knew there would be malice results from the actions if discovered by the spouse. I believe the wife in the River Thought Experiment saw it that way. From a Deontology point of view, the individual was doing what he or she did because their spouse did not meet the "moral ...
    Related: consequentialism, deontology, moral obligation, point of view, classification
  • Consequentialism Is A Philosophical Theory That Offers A Systematic Approach To Reaching Ethical And Moral Conclusions Conseq - 889 words
    Consequentialism is a philosophical theory that offers a systematic approach to reaching ethical and moral conclusions. Consequentialists believe that in making a decision regarding a moral or ethical issue, one must heavily consider the outcome of the action. A moral and good decision would ultimately result in overall net happiness, and in contrast wrong and immoral actions would result in net displeasure or pain. At first, this theory seems logical in terms of weighing the utility actions that lead to promotion of good and happiness. However, closer investigation brings attention to the numerous objections and obvious conflicts with out basic moral intuitions. When adopting the theory of ...
    Related: consequentialism, ethical, ethical issue, moral decision, moral obligation, philosophical, philosophical theory
  • Corporate Downsizing - 1,272 words
    ... we were a bunch of children and that we couldn't handle the truth. Extensive follow-up meetings could have also been essential in relieving fears and anxieties. It is imperative that companies maintain trust, keep the lines of communication open, and develop a strategic plan for its employees to follow after the initial downsizing. Taking these steps will enable the company and the workforce to prepare for the challenge of working with fewer resources and begin meeting the new challenges they may face in their new structured environment. At this point the Human Resource department should be highly involved in the decision-making process. After all, they are largely responsible for the hi ...
    Related: corporate, corporate america, downsizing, publishing company, labor laws
  • Crittically Examine The Use Of The Term Community - 1,398 words
    Crittically Examine The Use Of The Term Community Critically examine the use of the term community in the 1990s. The essay should be structured in such a way that it incorporates reference to Social Policy, Legislation and practice issues. Students will be required to make use of theoretical studies, particularly from relevant academic and other sources such as books, journals and relevant publications. The meaning of community is a tricky one. It is used in many different contexts and is a concept that means very different things to different people. A useful starting point is in the book Keywords by Raymond Williams. His research on the word community indicates that it has been part of Eng ...
    Related: community care, community development, community education, community policing, examine
  • Death By Choice: Who Should Decide - 389 words
    Death By Choice: Who Should Decide? Death By Choice: Who Should Decide? McGuires' references to prior cases and documents is done logically and clinically. After careful reading, and re-reading, I failed to understand his position on the moral issue. How can he perceive that by terminating a human life, this is acceptable moral behavior? Moral implies conformity to established codes or accepted notions of right and wrong. In other words, the basic moral values of society. Since when did society begin to accept that termination of life due to a dysfunction or deformity is moral? When did society decide that it is their moral obligation to determine when the quality of death supersedes the qua ...
    Related: human life, higher power, moral issue, capacity, morality
  • During The Past Quarter Century, Abortion Has Joined Race And - 1,440 words
    During the past quarter century, abortion has joined race and war as one of the most debatable subject of controversy in the United States. It discusses human interaction where ethics, emotions and law come together. Abortion poses a moral, social and medical dilemma that faces many individuals to create a emotional and violent atmosphere. There are many points of view toward abortion but the only two fine distinctions are "pro-choice" and "pro-life". A pro-choicer would feel that the decision to abort a pregnancy is that of the mothers and the state has no right to interfere. A pro-lifer would hold that from the moment of conception, the embryo or fetus is alive. This life imposes on us a m ...
    Related: abortion, national abortion, quarter, human rights, side effects
  • During The Past Quarter Century, Abortion Has Joined Race And War - 1,622 words
    During the past quarter century, abortion has joined race and war as one of the most debatable subjects of controversy in the United States. It discusses human interaction where ethics, emotions and law are combined. Abortion poses a moral, social and medical dilemmas that focus many individuals to create an emotional and violent atmosphere. There are many points of view toward abortion but the only two fine distinctions are "pro-choice" and "pro-life". A pro-choice person would feel that the decision to abort a pregnancy is that of the mothers and the state should have no right to interfere. A pro- life person would hold that from the moment of conception, that the embryo or fetus is alive. ...
    Related: abortion, national abortion, past years, quarter, women's health
  • Ethics On Abortion - 1,925 words
    Ethics On Abortion Abortion from an ethical point of view " Describe and evaluate any two contrasting theoretical approaches to the moral debate of abortion." * * * It is widely accepted that the fact of abortion has been a subject of conversation and controversy for many decades. Since the proportion of people who accept abortion as a 'normal' procedure is equal to the proportion of those who think of abortion as a 'crime', through time a lot of measurements have been taken against abortion but concerning it's defense as well. Although the fact of abortion has been examined through it's scientific and religious side, in this assignment we will try and examine abortion from an ethical point ...
    Related: abortion, abortion debate, ethics, morality of abortion, moral agent
  • Ethics Or Moral Philosophy - 424 words
    Ethics Or Moral Philosophy The field of ethics, also called moral philosophy, involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong behavior. Philosophers today usually divide ethical theories into three general subject areas: metaethics, normative ethics, and applied ethics. Metaethics investigates where our ethical principles come from, and what they mean. Metaethical answers to questions are focused on the issues of universal truths, the will of God, the role of reason in ethical judgments, and the meaning of ethical terms themselves. Normative ethics involves a more practical task, which is to arrive at moral standards that regulate right and wrong conduct. Idea ...
    Related: applied ethics, ethics, moral obligation, moral philosophy, philosophy
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