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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: assimilation

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  • A Patriarchal World Assimilation - 1,578 words
    A Patriarchal World --Assimilation A Patriarchal World John Bodnar says it well when he suggests that the center of everyday life was to be found in the family-household. It was here that past values and present realities were reconciled, examined on an intelligible scale, evaluated and mediated. This assertion implies that the immigrant family-household is the vehicle of assimilation. I will take this assertion a step further and examine more specifically the powerful role of the patriarchal father within Anzia Yezierska's book Bread Givers and Barry Levinson's film Avalon. Yezierska's theme vividly depicts the constraint of a patriarchal world, while Levinson illustrates the process of ass ...
    Related: assimilation, old world, patriarchal, jewish american, more important
  • Chaim Potok And The Problem Of Assimilation For The American Jew - 1,589 words
    Chaim Potok And The Problem Of Assimilation For The American Jew Chaim Potok and the Problem of Assimilation for the American Jew America has been a country of immigrants since Europeans first settled it over five hundred years ago. America has always faced the problem of assimilation, a challenge faced by every country with a considerable immigrant population. Because immigrants founded America, her culture is a combination of the cultures of other countries. Should these immigrants isolate themselves from the mainstream American culture, or should they sacrifice the culture of their homelands for the benefits American culture has to offer? Judaism, one of the worlds oldest religions, has r ...
    Related: american, american culture, american jews, assimilation, chaim potok, potok
  • Cultural Assimilation - 491 words
    Cultural Assimilation It is a big controversial subject that how much an international student should assimilate in the new culture. The result can move on a big scale. Depending on the person and its relationships it can cause depression. Two of my friends Aniko and Ivan are assimilating differently in the new culture. Aniko and Ivan share some similarities in the new culture. They both come here for the same reasons. They wanted to improve their language skills. Also they wanted to get an American degree. In addition they both wanted to continue their athletic carrier. Like Aniko, Ivan was accepted easily by Americans because they both good athletes. In the beginning the magic of the new l ...
    Related: assimilation, different ways, international students, athletic, firs
  • Physical Development - 886 words
    1.) There are 4 types of development. Physical development covers the learning of the ability to walk. It also encompasses all muscle development, and the idea that the person generally becomes more physically efficient over time. Cognitive development deals with the development of a way to think. For example, an infant tends to over generalize information. If he sees an animal and is told that it is a dog, any furry animal with 4 legs and a tale will be considered a dog. As cognitive development progresses, a person learns to be specific. We also build a sense of problem solving. Personal development refers to the changes in an individual's personality. As time progresses, and people learn ...
    Related: cognitive development, personal development, physical development, social development, building blocks
  • A New World Not So Far Away - 1,082 words
    A New World Not So Far Away A New World Not So Far Away There are a lot of differences between the American and Chinese culture and values. Aspects such as philosophy, family values, time management, individuality, and religion are just some modern examples of the many differences between these two major industrial countries. However, one does not have to come from China to experience just how different and influential these cultures are. Throughout most of my childhood, I have been predominantly exposed to nothing but the Chinese culture. When my parents first immigrated to the United States from Canton, China, they rented a small apartment located right in the heart of Chinatown. Chinatown ...
    Related: learn english, childhood memory, reading books, bought, winter
  • A Victim Of The Double Rape - 1,601 words
    A Victim of the Double Rape There is an old saying that goes "behind every strong man is a strong woman". This proverb can be used to describe the legacy of Hernando Cortes and his conquest of Mexico. Like the proverb, he had someone behind him who aided in his goals of dominance. The woman was Dona Marina, otherwise known as La Malinche. Her beauty and intelligence made her into one of the most hated and influential women in Mexico's history. According to Clifford Krauss, "La Malinche is for the most part portrayed as the perpetrator of Mexico's original sin" (110). La Malinche was a victim of a "double rape" (Todorov 49). Her destiny was determined at birth. As a child growing up in native ...
    Related: double, rape, spanish culture, female sexuality, refer
  • A Victim Of The Double Rape - 1,609 words
    ... e slaughtered in the imminent attack, the old woman suggested, Marina should gather possessions and seek refuge at the old woman's house, where, later, she could marry the woman's son. Marina pretended to accept the offerbut put the old woman off until night, warning her that Cortes' troops were on guard and would hear them. Marina then pumped the woman for more informationThe woman's husband, it turned out, was a Tlaxcalan captain who had, along with others, received gifts from the wily Moctezuma to help ambush Cortes (Adams 8). The information she was able to get from the old woman protected hundreds of Spanish from bloodshed. Another person La Malinche negotiated with was the great Mo ...
    Related: double, rape, new mexico, rutgers university, aztecs
  • Aborigines And Their Place In Politics - 1,065 words
    Aborigines And Their Place In Politics For much of their history, Australias major parties did not perceive a need to have Aboriginal affairs policies, but this altered in the 1960s and 1970s as the Aboriginal interest came to occupy a more prominent position. The policies of recent major governments, those being the Australian Labor Party (ALP) and the Coalition, consisting of the Liberal Party and National Party, have changed drastically since the Federation of Australia. The approaches throughout history of these major parties will be discussed briefly in order to gain an understanding of the foundation of each partys beliefs and platforms in regards to Aborigines. The main political issu ...
    Related: aborigines, self determination, international legal, aboriginal people, perceive
  • Aborigines And Their Place In Politics - 1,108 words
    ... s people in the criminal justice system. The Liberal Party reached an agreement with all states and territories to develop critical plans, in association with indigenous people, for the coordination of funding and service delivery aimed at reducing indigenous over-representation in the criminal justice system. This shows that the Liberal government is addressing the problem of Aboriginal deaths in custody, and giving weight to the issue in regards to their policies. While governments did in fact begin to respond to some of the affects of forcible removal during the 1980s, it was during the Labor governments reign that the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody handed down its ...
    Related: aborigines, common law, political issues, royal commission, liberal
  • Affirmative Action - 1,098 words
    Affirmative Action Affirmative Action ? The Right Approach? In the beginning, it seemed simple enough. In 1961, John F. Kennedy, then president of the United States of America, established the Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity by executive order. The goal was to curb discrimination by the government and its contractors, who were now required to ?not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment because of race, creed, color, or national origin. The Contractor will take affirmative action, to ensure that applicants are employed, and that employees are treated during employment, without regard to their race, creed, color, or national origin.? Title VI of the Civil Right ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, equal employment, lyndon b johnson, adopt
  • Africanamerican Representation In The Media - 1,845 words
    African-American Representation In The Media In Jacqueline Bobo's article, The Color Purple : Black Women as Cultural Readers, she discusses the way in which black women create meaning out of the mainstream text of the film The Color Purple. In Leslie B. Innis and Joe R. Feagin's article, The Cosby Show : The View From the Black Middle Class, they are examining black middle-class responses to the portrayal of black family life on The Cosby Show. In their respective articles, Bobo, and Innis and Feagin are investigating the representation of race, particularly African American race, in the mass media. The chief concerns of their investigations lie in how African Americans deal with the way th ...
    Related: mainstream media, mass media, media, representation, working women
  • American Studies - 1,845 words
    American Studies Understanding America November 11, 1999 Midterm Examination American Studies can be a variety of different meanings to a lot of different authors. They are all pretty much on the same note, but with different alterations. For me, I believe that it is to make connections between the past and how it will impact the future. American Studies has transformed overtime. Each individual has their own beliefs and feelings of what it really means. In Gene Wise's article he states how he is interested in how the field of American Studies has transformed overtime, what American Studies methodology is, and the types of questions that American Studies practitioners ask. I believe that the ...
    Related: african american, american, american culture, american history, american mind, american studies, early american
  • Analysis On Bulgaria - 4,272 words
    Analysis On Bulgaria External historical events often changed Bulgaria's national boundaries in its first century of existence, natural terrain features defined most boundaries after 1944, and no significant group of people suffered serious economic hardship because of border delineation. Postwar Bulgaria contained a large percentage of the ethnic Bulgarian people, although numerous migrations into and out of Bulgaria occurred at various times. None of the country's borders was officially disputed in 1991, although nationalist Bulgarians continued to claim that Bulgaria's share of Macedonia--which it shared with both Yugoslavia and Greece--was less than just because of the ethnic connection ...
    Related: bulgaria, district court, separation of church and state, public transportation, music
  • Antisemitism Influence - 2,144 words
    Anti-Semitism Influence The word rests in a conversation like a foul stench and with it comes unbidden images and accusations. Today in many circles this word alone is possibly the most horrendous name to place on a person. Maybe though, not because of what it means, but because of what it brings to mind. Automatically and unwanted, pictures come to our mind of goose stepping Nazis and concentration camps, bodies piled high and what we think of as the air fills with the scent of burning flesh. Our worst nightmares and human kinds worst behaviors. Yet, many of us do not know where the term came from or even what it means beyond their simple ideas. Even dictionaries only give the blandest desc ...
    Related: antisemitism, body politic, ku klux klan, christian faith, luther
  • Apache And Cherokee Indians - 631 words
    Apache and Cherokee Indians Apache and Cherokee Indians The Apache Indians of North America prospered for years throughout Kansas, New Mexico, and Arizona. They were a religious society who believed in a "giver of life". As any complex society today, The Apache had many inter-tribal differences, although the tribe as a whole was able to see through these conflicts. Women and the extended family played an important role in the society and also in the lives of young children. Groups of different extended families, called bands, often lived together and functioned democratically. The Apache also evolved as the coming of the white man changed their lives. These Indians became adept at using hors ...
    Related: apache, cherokee, cherokee people, indian culture, written language
  • Arabisraeli Conflict - 1,016 words
    ... void. Zionists urged the Arab inhabitants of Israel to "play their part in the development of the state, on the basis of full and equal citizenship". But many Palestinians distrusted the Zionists and looked to their Arab neighbors for help. In 1947-48, a war ensued between the Israel and the Arab nations. The Arab armies, underestimating the Israeli forces and determination, were defeated. From the Arabs perspective, their defeat in Palestine humiliated their armies and discredited their regimes. The UN secured several cease-fires, each time fighting resumed; finally an armistice between each Arab country and Israel was agreed upon separately, after Israel had pushed Arab forces out of t ...
    Related: palestinian refugees, first week, suez canal, hoping, acceptable
  • Articles Analysis - 1,239 words
    Article`S Analysis In Jacqueline Bobo's article, The Color Purple: Black Women as Cultural Readers, it is discussed how black women create meaning out of the mainstream text of the film The Color Purple. In Leslie B Innis and Joe R. Feagin's article, The Cosby Show: The View from the Black Middle Class, they are explaining black middle-classed responses to the portrayal of Black family life on The Cosby Show. In their articles, Bobo, Innis and Feagin are investigating the representation of race, particularly African American race, in the mass media. However, these two shows are better portrayed than what was seen in the first article. This article Midnight Ramble portrays a much earlier medi ...
    Related: african american, the color purple, cosby show, purple, sitting
  • Australian Aborigines - 1,418 words
    ... were forcing them off their hunting land and sacred areas. They couldn't compensate for the increasing population of the settlers. Before long, the Europeans became annoyed with the Aborigines and violence was inevitable. Some of the Aborigine groups were able to wage successful guerilla war against the Europeans, but eventually, the lack of technology became their downfall. Up to the 1880's, many Aborigines were killed as a result of fighting against the Europeans (Blainey, 93). Other groups were forced into hiding while others stayed in camps. The Aborigines who stayed in camps became the nucleus of the European labor force (Blainey, 102). Fighting wasn't the only thing that killed the ...
    Related: aborigines, australian, australian aborigines, australian government, research paper
  • Australian History Populate Or Perish - 701 words
    Australian history - Populate or Perish Australian history - Populate or Perish On the forming of the Federation of Australia, on 1 January 1901, one of the first priorities of the new Federal Government was to increase Australia's population. One way was to encourage an increase in the birth rate, which had been falling. A second way was to encourage immigration, not only from Great Britain, but also from other European countries. The main requirement was that immigrants be white skinned. Although this policy became known as the White Australia Policy, the regulations did not actually prohibit people with coloured skin. The prohibition was achieved through regulations requiring each immigra ...
    Related: australian, history, world war 2, economic development, restricting
  • Australian Immigration Law - 1,059 words
    Australian - Immigration Law Australia is similar to America in many ways. They are both industrialized nations, they were both settled by the British, and they both have multi-ethnic societies. However, the two countries have vastly different immigration laws. In America, we will let almost anyone move here and work. An American immigrant can be from (almost) any country, race, or religion. Australia on the other hand, has had a much stricter policy determining who can move to their country. Australia's immigration law is ethnocentric in nature because it excludes anyone who is not of Anglo-Saxon descent. The policy is in the best interest for the British settlers, rather than in the best i ...
    Related: australian, australian government, immigration, immigration laws, immigration policy
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