Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: aaron burr

  • 28 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • Aaron Burr Treason Trial - 1,399 words
    Aaron Burr Treason Trial The early 1800's were an unusual time in the history of the United States. A country in its infancy, growing, turbulent, and filled with intrigue where political and economic fortunes were made and lost overnight. While the country was founded on noble ideas---and no doubt these powerful ideas were taken seriously---how such ideas were to be put into practice created fertile ground for personal ambition and interest to be a stronger motivator than the "common good". In fact, at times it appears that the ideas were little more than vehicles for the personal ambitions---and in the case of this story---the personal vendettas of powerful personalities. Aaron Burr, brilli ...
    Related: aaron, aaron burr, burr, treason, trial
  • Aaron Burr Treason Trial - 1,364 words
    ... pt Wilkinson was the only real traitor in this story ... but he hadn't made Thomas Jefferson his personal enemy. Wilkinson's role in Burr's plan was to lead Burr's army of mercenaries against Mexico. In exchange, Burr would help Wilkinson become governor of the Louisiana territory (which he did) and compensate him with lands gained from Mexico. When Burr's plan was uncovered, and Wilkinson learned that President Jefferson had heard of the plot, he quickly wrote Jefferson a letter admitting everything hoping to gain indemnity in exchange for testifying against Burr. Jefferson first heard about Burr's plan on December 1st, 1805. But for a full year he did nothing. This has led many histori ...
    Related: aaron, aaron burr, burr, treason, trial
  • 5 Most Influential People In American History - 1,556 words
    5 Most Influential People In American History The United Sates has had a short yet complex history in its two hundred and twenty-four years. She has produced millions and millions of great individuals. These great minds have shaped what America is today. Others, however, have personally molded this magnificent nation with their own acts. John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, John Marshall, Henry Clay and Andrew Jackson are the most influential builders of the United States of America. John Adams was born loyal to the English Crown but evolved into the second President of the Free World. As a lawyer, Adams emerged into politics as an opponent of the Stamp Act and was a leader in the Revolutionary gro ...
    Related: american, american congress, american history, american revolution, american system, history, influential
  • Book Report On Thomas Jefferson - 1,051 words
    Book Report On Thomas Jefferson Book Review on Thomas Jefferson Thomas Jefferson by Norman Risjord is a biography of the third president of the United States that takes Thomas Jefferson from his youth through his later years in the early 19th century. The purpose of this book is to give a political and social overview of the Thomas Jefferson's life and career. It was written for both the student of American history and the casual reader interested in the genesis of the United States government, seen through the eyes of one of its founding fathers. The value of this book is that it shows that Jefferson was not a saint, yet he was one of the most intelligent presidents that the country has eve ...
    Related: book report, book reports, book review, jefferson, thomas jefferson
  • Burr Conspiracy - 1,173 words
    ... s now Princeton University. Burr joined the Continental Army in 1775, and rose to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. Burr was appointed attorney general of New York in 1789 and served as a United States senator from 1791 to 1797 (Onager CD-ROM). In the Election of 1800, Aaron Burr was the running mate of Republican candidate Thomas Jefferson. Although Burr was running for vice-president, he received as many votes as Jefferson did, and the House of Representatives chose Jefferson as president. After Burr's term as vice-president was over and he lost the race for the governorship of New York, Burr fought Alexander Hamilton in a duel in Weekawhen, New Jersey, on July 11,1804. Aaron Burr killed ...
    Related: aaron burr, burr, conspiracy, federalist papers, george washington
  • Dolly Madison - 1,481 words
    Dolly Madison Dolly Payne Madison was born in Guilford County, North Carolina on May 20, 1768. Dolly was born the first girl in a family of several children to Quaker parents, John Payne and Mary Coles. She spent her childhood in Scotchtown, Virginia. The Paynes were well connected and sufficiently prosperous, small planters in Hanover County.1 The Quaker house forbade festivity, shunned amusement and frowned upon the world's vanities. After a preliminary visit to Philadelphia, John Payne returned to Hanover County to dispose of his property and free his slaves and in July 1783 he settled with his family in the pleasant city of Philadelphia. In Philadelphia Dolly brought loveliness and charm ...
    Related: dolly, james madison, madison, secretary of state, north carolina
  • Electoral College - 1,801 words
    Electoral College Electoral College The Electoral College, friend or foe? The answer behind this question is in the minds of those that understand it. Whether it be a "friend" or a "foe" there will always be opposing sides and a controversial verse. Since the political circumstance of today, the Electoral College seems to be the topic in every conversation and the thesis to every essay. The uncontrollable desire to know the truth behind the mystery is stirring in the minds of the people in the United States of America. With the 2000 Elections underway sides are beginning to be taken among the people. Many oppose the Electoral College because of the fact that unknowing electors choose their l ...
    Related: college system, electoral, electoral college, founding fathers, controversial issue
  • Hamiltons Crusade - 1,619 words
    ... hat Hamilton had gone too far and labeled him an extremist. Much of what Hamilton proposed in his speech would end up in the Constitution such as the prohibitions on ex post facto laws, bills of attainder, grants of nobility, religious tests for government positions, and the establishment of any religion. The executive being the commander-in-chief of United States forces, being able to appoint heads of departments and make treaties and pardons with the Senates consent and the idea of having electors to vote for the executives head office are also in the Constitution. The day after Hamilton made his speech, the delegates voted on the Virginia Plan to be the basis of the government. Lansin ...
    Related: alexander hamilton, crusade, main argument, york harper, pseudonym
  • Hamiltons Crusade - 1,620 words
    ... the delegates felt that Hamilton had gone too far and labeled him an extremist. Much of what Hamilton proposed in his speech would end up in the Constitution such as the prohibitions on ex post facto laws, bills of attainder, grants of nobility, religious tests for government positions, and the establishment of any religion. The executive being the commander-in-chief of United States forces, being able to appoint heads of departments and make treaties and pardons with the Senates consent and the idea of having electors to vote for the executives head office are also in the Constitution. The day after Hamilton made his speech, the delegates voted on the Virginia Plan to be the basis of th ...
    Related: alexander hamilton, crusade, john jay, american world, commander
  • Hamiltons Crusade - 1,532 words
    ... o legislatures consisting of an assembly, directly elected by the people to a three-year term; and a senate, chosen by electors from senatorial districts to serve during good behavior. A judiciary consisting of twelve justices to serve during good behavior. The judiciary would have to be both original and appellate jurisdictions. An executive "Governor," whose election is made by electors chosen by the people from the senatorial districts, to serve during good behavior. After his speech, many of the delegates felt that Hamilton had gone too far and labeled him an extremist. Much of what Hamilton proposed in his speech would end up in the Constitution such as the prohibitions on ex post ...
    Related: alexander hamilton, crusade, virginia plan, great britain, houghton
  • History Of Electoral College - 951 words
    History Of Electoral College HISTORY OF THE ELECTORAL COLLEGE The Electoral College is the name for the electors who nominally choose the president and vice president of the United States. Each of the states receives a certain number of electors, which is determined by the total number of senators and representatives it sends to the U.S. Congress. Therefore, each state has at least 3 electors. The Electoral College was devised by the Framers of the Constitution as a procedure to elect the president by the people, at least indirectly. The framers came up with this procedure for many reasons. Such reasons included the lack of information to make a good choice by the people and it was also a wa ...
    Related: electoral, electoral college, history, state legislature, house of representatives
  • Jeffersonian Republicans - 984 words
    Jeffersonian Republicans (1) Some English observers may have viewed Jeffersonian Republicans as hypocritical for several reasons. Jefferson ran for the presidency in order to achieve specific goals such as, the reduction of the size and cost of the federal government, the repeal of Federalist legislation, and to maintain international peace. Jefferson was successful for some time in reducing the size and cost of the federal government. He closed several American embassies in Europe. He cut military spending by reducing the size of the U.S. Army by 50 percent and retiring a majority of the navy's warships. However, despite all these cut expenses, Jefferson found it suitable to accommodate the ...
    Related: jeffersonian, jeffersonian republicans, civil rights, chief justice, commission
  • President Andrew Jackson - 1,032 words
    President Andrew Jackson Andrew Jackson was born in 1767, and grew up in the border of North and South Carolina. He attended frontier schools and acquired the reputation of being fiery-tempered and willing to fight all comers. He also learned to read, and he was often called on by the community to read aloud the news from the Philadelphia papers. In 1775, with the beginning of the American Revolution, Andrew Jackson, then only 13 years old became an orderly and messenger. He took part in the Battle of Hanging Rock against the British and in a few small skirmishes with British sympathizers known as Loyalists or Tories. His brother Hugh was killed, and when the British raided Waxhaw, both he a ...
    Related: andrew, andrew jackson, jackson, president andrew jackson, vice president
  • The Electoral College - 206 words
    The Electoral College The History of the Electoral College The electoral college was developed by the framers of the constitution. This proved to be more difficult than they anticipated. The founding fathers faced the difficult question of how to elect a president in a nation that: was composed of thirteen large and small states, contained only 4,000,000 people spread up and down the Atlantic seaboard barely connected by transportaion so national campag They were not willing to give the choice of president to the average citizen. Instead, they divised a group of select citizens called electors-the Electoral College-should decide the president. Candidate that received the highest number of vo ...
    Related: electoral, electoral college, thomas jefferson, vice president, candidate
  • The Separtion Of Powers - 1,713 words
    ... through interpretations of laws by the courts, and through the president's position as leader of his party. The president is charged with enforcing all federal laws and with supervising all federal administrative agencies. In practice these powers are delegated to subordinates. The president's principal helpers include the White House staff, specialised agencies of the Executive Office, and the heads of executive departments and their agencies and bureaus. Except for the White House staff, the individuals in charge of agencies and departments are appointed by the president, subject to approval by the Senate. The president nominates all officials, administrative or judicial, who are not c ...
    Related: emergency powers, executive power, political power, power over, separation of powers
  • Thomas Jefferson - 522 words
    Thomas Jefferson THOMAS JEFFERSON In the thick of party conflict in 1800, Thomas Jefferson wrote in a private letter, I have sworn upon the altar of God eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man. This powerful advocate of liberty was born in 1743 in Albermarle County, Virginia, inheriting from his father, a planter and surveyor, some 5,000 acres of land, and from his mother, a Randolph, high social standing. He studied at the College of William and Mary, then read law. In 1772 he married Martha Wayles Skelton, a widow, and took her to live in his partly constructed mountaintop home, Monticello. Freckled and sandy-haired, rather tall and awkward, Jefferson was eloqu ...
    Related: jefferson, thomas jefferson, alexander hamilton, aaron burr, france
  • Thomas Jefferson - 1,074 words
    ... Monticello, and supervised the construction. After three rather active years of "retirement", Jefferson accepted the Republican Party's nomination in 1796 for President. He lost by three votes, which under the prevailing system, meant he was elected Vice President and the Federalist, John Adams, was elected president. The Federalist Administration turned upon its political opponents by passing the Alien Act, to deport foreign radicals and liberal, propagandists and agitators, and the Sedition Act, to curb the press. The Sedition Act empowered the Administration to fine, imprison, and prosecute any opposition writer and thus the Republicans were muzzled in the remaining years of Adams' A ...
    Related: jefferson, president jefferson, thomas jefferson, national library, louisiana territory
  • Thomas Jefferson - 1,036 words
    ... hought of retiring from the cabinet position in which he was constantly arguing against Hamilton, the power-hungry man in the capitol. After negotiating the countrys foreign problems, Jefferson once again retired to Monticello. During retirement, Jefferson supervised the farming of his many lands and designed a plow which revolutionized agriculture; he tended library like a garden. he changed the architectural plans for Monticello, and supervised the construction. After three rather active years of retirement, Jefferson accepted the Republican Partys nomination in 1796 for president. He lost by three votes, which under the prevailing system meant he was elected Vice President and the Fed ...
    Related: jefferson, thomas jefferson, general education, political theory, religion
  • Thomas Jefferson - 362 words
    Thomas Jefferson Thomas Jefferson was born on April 13, 1743 in Albemarle County, Va. Jefferson attended the College of William and Mary and then studied law with George Wythe. In 1769 he began six years as a representative in the Virginia House of Burgesses. In 1770 he began building Monticello on land inherited by his father. Jefferson married Martha Wayles Skelton. They had six children. Only two of them survived into their adulthood. His wife died on September 6, 1782. Jefferson was the primary author of the Declaration of Independence. When Jefferson returned to Virginia, he served in the House of Delegates until 1779. While the American Revolution continued, Jefferson wanted to liberal ...
    Related: jefferson, thomas jefferson, john adams, presidential candidate, anniversary
  • Thomas Jefferson - 1,469 words
    Thomas Jefferson Thomas Jefferson Thomas Jefferson symbolizes the promise and the contradictions of America's historical heritage. As the third president of the United States, a diplomat, plantation owner, architect, scientist, and philosopher, he is one of the most important figures in American history. The writings of Thomas Jefferson are today more meaningful than ever before in America's history. You could reach into your pocket, pull out a nickel and find him gazing into the middle distance. Jefferson was born on April 13 (April 2, Old Style), 1743, at Shadwell, the most important of the tobacco plantations owned by his father Peter Jefferson, in the Virginia upcountry. An intelligent m ...
    Related: jefferson, peter jefferson, thomas jefferson, house of representatives, america american
  • 28 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2