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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: modest

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  • A Modest Proposal - 1,470 words
    A Modest Proposal A Modest Proposal For Preventing The Children of Poor People in Ireland From Being Aburden to Their Parents or Country, and For Making Them Beneficial to The Public Jonathan Swift It is a melancholy object to those who walk through this great town or travel in the country, when they see the streets, the roads, and cabin doors, crowded with beggars of the female sex, followed by three, four, or six children, all in rags and importuning every passenger for an alms. These mothers, instead of being able to work for their honest livelihood, are forced to employ all their time in strolling to beg sustenance for their helpless infants: who as they grow up either turn thieves for w ...
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  • A Modest Proposal - 1,452 words
    ... his kingdom, having of late destroyed their deer, he conceived that the want of venison might be well supplied by the bodies of young lads and maidens, not exceeding fourteen years of age nor under twelve; so great a number of both sexes in every country being now ready to starve for want of work and service; and these to be disposed of by their parents, if alive, or otherwise by their nearest relations. But with due deference to so excellent a friend and so deserving a patriot, I cannot be altogether in his sentiments; for as to the males, my American acquaintance assured me, from frequent experience, that their flesh was generally tough and lean, like that of our schoolboys by continua ...
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  • A Modest Proposal - 1,260 words
    A Modest Proposal Unlike most essays, Jonathan Swift's A Modest Proposal is written for the reader to see through what the narrator is expressing. The narrator does not want the reader to agree that the solution to overpopulation and poverty in Ireland is to eat babies, he wants the reader to see there needs to be a practical solution. By stating the advantages and objections to his proposal, using ironic words and phrases, he directs the reader not to see the apparent, but the implicit. Swift's narrative voice metaphorically compares the Irish to pigs and cows, which implies the Irish are being treated subhumanly. Although something seems one way to the narrator, Jonathan Swift wants the re ...
    Related: modest, modest proposal, proposal, harcourt brace, young children
  • A Modest Proposal By Swift - 1,196 words
    A Modest Proposal By Swift A Modest Proposal was a satirical essay written by Jonathan Swift depicting the horrific conditions of Ireland and the lives of the Irish people in 1729. The author portrays and attacks the cruel and unjust oppression of Ireland by its oppressor, the mighty English and ridicules the Irish people at the same time. However, Swift's opposition is indirectly presented. Jonathan Swift is able to do so by using the persona, irony, and wit in order to expose the remarkable corruption and degradation of the Irish people, and at the same time present them with practicable solutions to their unscrupulous and pathetic lives. The author uses a satire to accomplish his objectiv ...
    Related: jonathan swift, modest, modest proposal, proposal, swift
  • A Modest Proposal: A Different Version - 1,024 words
    A Modest Proposal: A Different Version I am among the 850 people that attend Jesuit Prep. Each day at Jesuit Prep, we attend 8 grueling classes with 45 minutes of monotonous teaching about many subjects. Within each classroom, all the beady eyes of each student stare off into either space or the hanging clock on the opposite wall. As the 45 minutes tick away and the teacher rambles about a subject, the second and minute hand on the clock seem to slow down, then stop their rotational turns. While the clock appears to stop, often our heads droop down, at where we are sitting, till they reach a comfortable position upon our arms which we have placed across our desks. Once this repetitive classr ...
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  • Colonization In The Theme Of Conrads Heart Of Darkness And Swifts A Modest Proposal - 1,856 words
    Colonization In The Theme Of Conrads Heart Of Darkness And Swift's A Modest Proposal Joseph Riley McCormack Professor Alan Somerset English 020 Section 007 Submission Date: March 22, 2000 Colonization in the Theme of A Modest Proposal and Heart of Darkness Starting at the beginning of the seventeenth century, European countries began exploring and colonizing many different areas of the world. The last half of the nineteenth century saw the height of European colonial power around the globe. France, Belgium, Germany, and especially Great Britain, controlled over half the world. Along with this achievement came a notable sense of pride and confident belief that European civilization was the be ...
    Related: colonization, darkness, heart of darkness, jonathan swift, joseph conrad, modest, modest proposal
  • Heart Of Darkness And Modest Proposal - 1,836 words
    Heart Of Darkness And Modest Proposal Colonization in the Theme of "A Modest Proposal" and "Heart of Darkness" Starting at the beginning of the seventeenth century, European countries began exploring and colonizing many different areas of the world. The last half of the nineteenth century saw the height of European colonial power around the globe. France, Belgium, Germany, and especially Great Britain, controlled over half the world. Along with this achievement came a notable sense of pride and confident belief that European civilization was the best on earth and that the natives of the lands Europeans controlled would only benefit from colonial influence. However, not everybody saw coloniza ...
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  • Modest Proposal - 1,444 words
    Modest Proposal Criticisms in Jonathan Swifts A Modest Proposal A satire is a literary work in which human foolishness and vice are criticized. Satire employs humor and wit to ridicule human institutions or humanity itself, in order that they might be remodeled or improved (Random House). A Modest Proposal, by Jonathan Swift is a prime example of a satire. Throughout the piece it is difficult to know exactly whom and what Swift is criticizing. This is because Swift criticizes three groups of people and uses metaphors to make the satire work. Swift ridicules the English for economically oppressing the Irish, the Irish for being passive and allowing the English to oppress them, and the reader ...
    Related: modest, modest proposal, proposal, moral decision, central theme
  • Modest Proposal By Swift - 1,385 words
    Modest Proposal By Swift In Jonathan Swifts essay, "A Modest Proposal", Swift proposes that the poor should eat their own starving children during a great a famine in Ireland. What would draw Swift into writing to such lengths. When times get hard in Ireland, Swift states that the children would make great meals. The key factor to Swifts essay that the reader must see that Swift is not literally ordering the poor to cannibalize. Swift acknowledges the fact of the scarcity of food and empathizes with the struggling and famished souls of Ireland through the strange essay. Being of high society Britain, which at the time mothered Ireland, Swift utilizes his work to satirically place much of the ...
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  • Swifts A Modest Proposal In His Lengthy Literary Career, Jonathan Swift Wrote Many Stories That Used A Broad Range Of Voices - 1,506 words
    Swift's "A Modest Proposal" In his lengthy literary career, Jonathan Swift wrote many stories that used a broad range of voices that were used to make some compelling personal statements. For example, Swifts, A Modest Proposal, is often heralded as his best use of both sarcasm and irony. Yet taking into account the persona of Swift, as well as the period in which it was written, one can prove that through that same use of sarcasm and irony, this proposal is actually written to entertain the upper-class. Therefore the true irony in this story lies not in the analyzation of minute details in the story, but rather in the context of the story as it is written. One of the voices that is present t ...
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  • Buckley Jr - 2,713 words
    1. WM. F. BUCKLEY JR. Last summer WFB was asked by the New York Bar Association to make a statement to the panel of lawyers considering the drug question. He made the following statement: We are speaking of a plague that consumes an estimated $75 billion per year of public money, exacts an estimated $70 billion a year from consumers, is responsible for nearly 50 per cent of the million Americans who are today in jail, occupies an estimated 50 per cent of the trial time of our judiciary, and takes the time of 400,000 policemen--yet a plague for which no cure is at hand, nor in prospect. Perhaps you, ladies and gentlemen of the Bar, will understand it if I chronicle my own itinerary on the sub ...
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  • Buckley Jr - 2,624 words
    ... alleviate the symptoms of glaucoma; to improve appetite dangerously reduced from AIDS. They use it as an effective medicine, yet they are technically regarded as criminals, and every year many are jailed. Although more than 75 per cent of Americans believe that marijuana should be available legally for medical purposes, the Federal Government refuses to legalize access or even to sponsor research. 2. Drugs are here to stay. The time has come to abandon the concept of a "drug-free society." We need to focus on learning to live with drugs in such a way that they do the least possible harm. So far as I can ascertain, the societies that have proved most successful in minimizing drug-related ...
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  • 19th Century Settlement - 799 words
    19th Century settlement In the early 1800s a number of French explorers visited the south west coast of Australia. The British, who were at war with the French at that time, became concerned that a French presence in the south west of the continent could endanger trade with the eastern colonies. In 1819 Phillip Parker King and his crew patrolled the southwest, although it was not until his second voyage in 1822 that they made landfall on "Rottenest. Settlement of the Swan River Colony began in 1829, and interest was shown almost immediately in Rottnest as a secure place with the potential for salt harvesting, farming and fishing. Rottnest was surveyed with provision for a town in 1830, and i ...
    Related: settlement, physical development, state government, west coast, drowned
  • A Background Of Argentina - 614 words
    A background of Argentina A background of Argentina In the beginning of Argentina, we recall two major tribes; the Diaguita and the Gaurani who constituted the agricultural origins. During the 1500s, Spain discovered Argentina, and quickly claimed it for its own. Spain reigned until the 1800s when it was at war with Britain. In 1816 Argentina declared independence from Spain. After WWII there was a struggle for leadership of Argentina, eventually Juan Peron, a former dictator, was elected President. Peron represented himself as a leader for the common people, however his administration embezzled funds stole from the workers. With the help of his wife, Eva Peron, who became a spiritual symbol ...
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  • A Booming End To The 19th Century - 1,105 words
    A Booming End To The 19Th Century More changes occurred in America in the late 19th century than any other time period. The country went through rapid expansion from residents of its land to cuisine to transportation of goods and people. While the last quarter of the 20th century brought many modern conveniences, the century before brought this country things that would be nearly impossible to live without. The development of railroads was the single greatest change in the 19th century. In only twenty-five years, almost 70,000 miles of tracks were laid. This in itself was a great feat, because of all the people and products used in the building of the railroads. In order to build railroads, ...
    Related: civil war, conspicuous consumption, raw materials, layout, telephone
  • A Lesson From Oliver - 5,155 words
    A Lesson From Oliver by David Jorgensen Like any other morning I was up at four, the day Oliver met with his violent death. At four in the morning the grass is wet. Now, it's still wet at 6 a.m. and even at seven, and these tend to be the hours of choice for most people wishing to appreciate the phenomenon of grass wetness. But it's a tragedy of economics that, when work starts at 5 a.m., one is not afforded the same time-options for grass appreciation as members of the sane world. Nor was this tragedy confined to my having to appreciate the wet grass while in a metabolic state more suited to hibernation. Four a.m. was my only chance to absorb all of northern Ontario's summer morning treasur ...
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  • A Lovely Rose In The Poem Song By Edmund Waller - 980 words
    A Lovely Rose In The Poem Song By Edmund Waller For many centuries, young men have been telling their sweethearts about ephemeral youth and passion which, like a candle, burns brightly but dies out slowly but surely. Edmund Waller's persona in the poem Song is such a young man. He sends a rose to his beloved to Tell her that [she] wastes her time and [him] (2) by acting shy and staying out of sight. This young lover is trying to tell his paramour that their time is too short for such petty things. He is telling her to forget society and let her feelings lead the way. The speaker of this poem wants his mistress to understand this eagerness of his, and drop everything and come running to enjoy ...
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  • A Steercar Named Desire Blanches Psychological Breakdown - 1,469 words
    A Steercar Named Desire - Blanche's Psychological Breakdown In Tennesse Williams' play, "A Streetcar Named Desire" the readers are introduced to a character named Blanche DuBois. In the plot, Blanche is Stella's younger sister who has come to visit Stella and her husband Stanley in New Orleans. After their first meeting Stanley develops a strong dislike for Blanche and everything associated with her. Among the things Stanley dislikes about Blanche are her "spoiled-girl" manners and her indirect and quizzical way of conversing. Stanley also believes that Blanche has conned him and his wife out of the family mansion. In his opinion, she is a good-for-nothing "leech" that has attached itself to ...
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  • Aids In Africa - 1,109 words
    Aids In Africa As recently as 1990, there were some regions of the world that had remained relatively unscathed by AIDS. Today, however, there is not a single country around the world which has wholly escaped the AIDS epidemic. As the epidemic has matured, some of the developed nations which were hard hit by the epidemic in the 1980s such as the United States have reported a slowing in the rate of new infections and a stabilization among existing cases with lower mortality rates and an extension of post-diagnosis lifespan. However, despite the changing face of the global AIDS pandemic, one factor remains unchanged: no region of the world bears a higher AIDS-related burden than sub-Saharan Af ...
    Related: africa, aids, aids epidemic, east africa, saharan africa, sub-saharan africa, west africa
  • Aids Related Stigma Since The Appearance Of Aids In The Late Seventies And Early Eighties, The Disease Has Had Attached To It - 1,516 words
    ... lthough some things have changed and laws have been passed, the effects if stigma are still prevalent. Many people still express feelings of fear and hostility towards PLWAs (OHare, et al., 1996). Most of the negative attitudes felt and expressed are irrational but the effects can be devastating. One effect is peoples tendency to avoid all contact with PLWAs which contributes to social isolation. Also, even though legislation has been passed, discrimination still does exist. When asked about the treatment he received at Montreal General Hospital, an HIV positive patient explained that AIDS discrimination is far from being eradicated and that PLWAs are treated in a very negative fashion i ...
    Related: aids, seventies, stigma, issues surrounding, care system
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