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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: modern world

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  • Crime Is Inevitably One Of The Biggest Problems That Faces The Modern World Today It Can Be Found All Over The World, Whether - 1,334 words
    Crime is inevitably one of the biggest problems that faces the modern world today. It can be found all over the world, whether in large cities or small villages. Over time, society has tried to find ways to deal with crime. Such methods include community service, paying a fine serving some time in prison, and in the case of more serious crimes, the death penalty. This is the case in some states in the U.S. where persons have been executed for aggravated assault, rape, kidnapping, armed robbery, sabotage and espionage. Advocates for capital punishment feel that it deters criminals from committing crime and that if the criminal is not executed, the risk later extends to the community as such p ...
    Related: crime, modern world, over time, violent crime, world today
  • Crime Is Inevitably One Of The Biggest Problems That Faces The Modern World Today It Can Be Found All Over The World, Whether - 1,324 words
    ... ze that ...a good end, no matter how compelling, never justifies an evil means. Never, in other words may [one fundamental human good] be intentionally sacrificed... for the sake of another (Campbell,17). Only in the first case can the principle of double effect be invoked. Capital punishment is similar to the second case. It violates the principle in that through evil means, the execution of a human being, can a good end, the protection of the common good, be obtained. Another example how the principle of double effect works can be shown through a person who has a deadly tumor in his leg which must be removed, but may cause a problem with mobility. The procedure, there for, has two effe ...
    Related: crime, modern society, modern world, violent crime, world today
  • Global Problems Affect The Modern World Todays Rapid Changes Have Made Countries More Interdependent Than Ever Before, Shrink - 437 words
    Global problems affect the modern world. Todays rapid changes have made countries more interdependent than ever before, shrinking the world into a global village. As the world grows smaller, events in any one area have a greater impact on other parts of the world. National borders do not limit the effects of pollution or environmental destruction. Even poverty in some areas affects other areas because of migration and its impact on the world economy. Three examples of global problems that affect the modern world are famine, pollution, and terrorism. Only few countries are able to produce more food than their citizens need. For the rest of the world, hunger and malnutrition are common. In dev ...
    Related: global village, interdependent, modern world, rapid, world economy, world hunger
  • Storytelling In A Modern World - 1,087 words
    Storytelling in a Modern World We humans are all storytellers, or story-listeners, or both. That's a crucial element of our humanity. Passing down the generations, constantly changing under the pressure of altering circumstances, stories link humanity together in chains of narrative. Odysseus sets out on the wine-dark sea, fights ferocious monsters, endures endless hardships, and eventually finds his way home; and so does Tim OBrien in The Things They Carried; and so do many thousands of other heroes conceived in the 2,900 years between Odysseus and OBrien. Storytelling has been, since the earliest times, the way people have ordered their reality. It is the fundamental use of language, that ...
    Related: modern world, storytelling, things they carried, james baldwin, fundamental
  • The Concept Of Girlhood In The Modern World - 1,747 words
    The Concept Of Girlhood In The Modern World THE GIRL-CHILD IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY The girl-child is one of, if not the most, exploitable segments of the world's population. Children in general because of their dependence upon adults and their natural naivet due to lack of life experience. In the context of our new global economy, child labor issues are becoming very prevalent and their discussion very necessary. The tragedy of the child labor issues is that the multinational corporations created within the global economy are not able to see the damage they cause in other countries. Also, modern corporate organization doesn't require the business leaders to view the conditions of their employe ...
    Related: modern world, third world, third world countries, world countries, global economy
  • William Blakes Relevance To The Modern World - 745 words
    William BlakeS Relevance To The Modern World William Blakes Relevance to the Modern World William Blake, who lived in the latter half of the eighteenth century and the early part of the nineteenth, was a profoundly stirring poet who was, in large part, responsible for bringing about the Romantic movement in poetry; was able to achieve remarkable results with the simplest means; and was one of several poets of the time who restored rich musicality to the language (Appelbaum v). His research and introspection into the human mind and soul has resulted in his being called the Columbus of the psyche, and because no language existed at the time to describe what he discovered on his voyages, he cre ...
    Related: modern world, relevance, western world, william blake, the narrator
  • 51000 - 994 words
    5/10/00 Globalization and Ideal Landscapes Globalization is a broad term that has several meanings to different factions, cultural Groups and nations. For our purposes globalization refers to the loss of time and space through the rapid development of technologies. It also refers to a world in which all nations and peoples are directly or indirectly connected through the international economy and world politics. This rapid trend toward a globalized world has seen supporters from both the first world financial sectors and the mass producing agricultural sector. Its main detractors have been environmentalists and the indigenous peoples who are adversely affected by the encroaching nature of gl ...
    Related: point of view, computers and the internet, indigenous people, landscape, supporters
  • A Brief View Of Early Western Civilization In The 18th Century - 973 words
    A Brief View Of Early Western Civilization In The 18Th Century The area of early western civilization just following the feudal period was a very interesting time in Europe. There were many new innovations and problems in the way of life of the people of that time. Agriculture was still the main occupation of the time for most people. Two big problems that the people faced were those of war and poor harvest. It was said that perhaps the largest problem was the problem with poor grain. For the majority of people there was also the problem of land. For these people they either had no land of their own or insufficient amounts of it to support a family even when times were good. Poor harvests al ...
    Related: century england, civilization, western civilization, prentice hall, third edition
  • A Crime In The Neigborhood - 1,324 words
    A Crime In The Neigborhood A Crime In The Neigborhood It was the summer of 1972 when Spring Hill, a Washington, D.C., suburb, got its first taste of an increasingly violent, insecure modern world. The quiet residential area, whose inhabitants traditionally left their doors unlocked and spent the summers attending one another's cookout, was rocked by the news that 12-year-old Boyd Ellison had been raped and murdered, his body dumped behind the local mall. While shaken residents organized a neighborhood watch program and clued detectives in on anyone's suspicious behavior, the inhabitants of at least one house were distracted by a tragedy of their own: 10-year-old Marsha Eberhardt's father, La ...
    Related: crime, young child, neighborhood watch, modern world, yard
  • A Postmodern Age - 1,423 words
    A Post-Modern Age? A Post-Modern Age? Introduction: Post-Modernism can be described as a particular style of thought. It is a concept that correlates the emergence of new features and types of social life and economic order in a culture; often called modernization, post-industrial, consumer, media, or multinational capitalistic societies. In Modernity, we have the sense or idea that the present is discontinuous with the past, that through a process of social, technological, and cultural change (either through improvement, that is, progress, or through decline) life in the present is fundamentally different from life in the past. This sense or idea as a world view contrasts with what is commo ...
    Related: postmodern, american market, european history, post modern, depot
  • Absurd - 1,338 words
    ... hinoceros, as being the Nazi influence, and Berenger, the main character, as an ordinary man in an extraordinary situation. The chaos of the early to mid-twentieth century influenced Ionesco's life and work's greatly. He struggled with the concept of the absurd and soon became the father of the theatre of the absurd. He led men such as Samuel Beckett and Jean Genet to a greater understanding of the absurd. Samuel Beckett was one of the greatest names of the theater of the absurd. He spent a lifetime of hardship and work to overcome the challenges of his low self-esteem and confidence. He grew up in Dublin, Ireland, in a prominent family. After college, he was employed as James Joyce's se ...
    Related: absurd, modern world, liberation organization, middle class, autobiographical
  • Affirmative Action - 1,025 words
    Affirmative Action The idea that different subcategories of humans exist, and that depending on one's point of view, some subcategories are inherently inferior to others, has been around since ancient times. This concept eventually gained the label of "race" in 1789, a "zoological term... generally defined as a subcategory of a species which inherits certain physical characteristics that distinguish it from other categories of that same species." (Tivnan 181). Although slavery has been by and large eliminated in virtually every part of the modern world, the concept used to rationalize its implementation, "racism", still plagues most modern cultures. Races that were once enslaved, or are mino ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, education system, equal rights, inherently
  • Airframe - 1,100 words
    Airframe Airframe, a novel by Michael Crichton was a fairly good book that became very exciting towards the end. It is about the aviation industry and a fictional company named Norton Aircraft that manufactures planes. There is only one main character and the plot of the novel is about a secret plan to destroy the president of Norton. The book gets off to a slow start, but rapidly builds up pace in the last hundred pages. The main character of the novel is Casey Singleton. She is a divorced mother in her mid-forties. She is a vice president of the Quality Assurance Incident Review Team. Whenever anything goes wrong with a plane that was made by Norton, the Incident Review Team finds out what ...
    Related: airframe, goes wrong, lost world, main character, reporter
  • Alberty Einstein - 592 words
    Alberty Einstein ALBERT EINSTEIN Albert Einstein was one of the greatest scientists of all time. Best known as a physicist for developing his famous theory of relativity, Einstein was born on March 14, 1879, in Ulm, Wrttemberg, Germany. When he was five years old, his father showed him a pocket compass. Young Einstein was deeply impressed by the mysterious behavior of the compass needle, which kept pointing the same direction no matter which way the compass was turned. He later said he felt then that something deeply hidden had to be behind such things. Einstein attended public school in Munich and in Aarau, Switzerland. He then studied mathematics and physics at the Swiss Polytechnic Instit ...
    Related: albert einstein, einstein, public school, quantum theory, atomic
  • Alfred Adler - 1,154 words
    Alfred Adler Adler, Alfred Adler, Alfred (1870-1937), Austrian psychologist and psychiatrist, born in Vienna, and educated at Vienna University. After leaving the university he studied and was associated with Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis. In 1911 Adler left the orthodox psychoanalytic school to found a neo-Freudian school of psychoanalysis. After 1926 he was a visiting professor at Columbia University, and in 1935 he and his family moved to the United States. In his analysis of individual development, Adler stressed the sense of inferiority, rather than sexual drives, as the motivating force in human life. According to Adler, conscious or subconscious feelings of inferiority ...
    Related: adler, alfred, alfred adler, individual psychology, south china
  • America Tax - 1,178 words
    America Tax Running head: Taxes Taxes: Who benefits and who gets ripped off Taxes 2 Abstract Taxes are the dollars that we pay to government to supply the services that are not or can not be provided through the free enterprise system. Taxes have been around since the beginning of organized societies. They come in various forms. Most common are income taxes both federal and local government. These taxes are assessed on the amount of income a person earns. Other taxes come in the form of user taxes; these taxes are imposed on the people that are using the goods being taxed, such as gas tax, alcohol tax, sales tax, and luxury taxes. Property taxes make up the major revenues for local and city ...
    Related: america, national defense, property tax, primary education, furthering
  • America: The Myth Of Equality - 1,313 words
    America: The Myth Of Equality America The Myth of Equality To many, the Unites States serves as the ideal model of democracy for the modern world. Yet, how truly worthy is America of this status? Although it has been said that, "Equality is as American as baseball, hot dogs, and apple pie," one must be extremely critical when analyzing such a statement. By taking a historical perspective to the question of how "equal" American equality actually is, it is simple to recognize how problematic the "Land of the Free" mentality can be. The early America's most prominent thinkers have been sensationalized and given credit for developing a free and equal system. However, one can recognize that their ...
    Related: equality, myth, social equality, social groups, john jay
  • Anaysis Of Turkey - 2,167 words
    ... t's earthquake. Turkey has had difficulty putting together a 2000 budget and the talks with International Monetary fund are being delayed. The task of computing the costs of the earthquake is going to dictate when decisions will be made regarding loans from the IMF. The IMF pledged financial resources in July if Turkey makes reform progress. The government has moved quickly on structural reforms, pushing banking, pension, and international arbitration laws through parliament. But government sources say Turkeys lack of commitment to a tight fiscal policy for 2000 have raised concerns about the fate of the talks. (WASHINGTON, Sept 09,Reuters) Foreign Debt: (4)***(4) Funds will continue to ...
    Related: anaysis, turkey, job creation, labor force, banking
  • Ancient History - 1,386 words
    Ancient History Tombs and Temples What are some major architectural structures of Ancient Egypt? There are many amazing sites of architecture in Egypt from ancient times. Many have been discovered, but there are still ones being discovered and excavated today. Pyramids, tombs, and temples are the main structures still standing that can be seen today. The first tombs of the pharaohs were large, unimpressive, bunker affairs called mastabas. A mastaba (Arabic for"bench") is a low rectangular structure which was built over a shaft which descended to the burial location. They were made from sun dried mud bricks and most have long since crumbled to dust. This all changed around 2630 BC with the cr ...
    Related: ancient egypt, ancient egyptians, ancient history, ancient times, ancient world, history
  • Aristotle - 1,142 words
    Aristotle An ethical issue that is debated in our society is the concern of driving while intoxicated. Although this was naturally not the case during Aristotles time, many of his ethical beliefs can be applied to refute this dilemma. I will prove the standing issue to be unethical through Aristotles discussion of virtue and his concept of voluntary/involuntary actions in the Nicomachean Ethics. Aristotle believed that of the virtues learned in our youth, each has a respective excess and deficiency. The virtue is the mean (or midpoint) of the excess and deficiency. The mean can be thought of as just right, and the extremities can be labeled as vices. The mean should not be thought of as the ...
    Related: aristotle, princeton university, university press, modern world, alcoholic
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