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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: modern western

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  • Acupuncture Today - 648 words
    Acupuncture Today Today, Mrs. Williams will be experiencing a new treatment for her chronic back pain. Chiropractic medicine had failed her before, and her daily prescription drugs were worth neither the money nor the side effects they caused. When the doctor came into the room with a tray of thin, long needles, Mrs. Williams knew that her hematophobia would cause her no discomfort; these needles were not for drawing blood. Her back pain will be relieved through acupuncture, the 5000-year-old Chinese practice of treating pain through the balancing of energy channels. Since President Nixon's historical visit to China in 1972, a new wave of traditional Chinese medicine has swept through the Un ...
    Related: acupuncture, traditional chinese, back pain, traditional chinese medicine, remedy
  • Ancient Egypt - 1,006 words
    Ancient Egypt The civilization of ancient Egypt is significant in several ways. Egyptian influence on other peoples was also significant. Ancient kingdoms of the Sudan adapted its HIEROGLYPHIC writing system and other cultural elements. The two last regions and the Bible are the most important antecedents of the modern western world that owe something to Egypt. The western alphabet is derived from a Phoenician one possibly modeled on Egyptian hieroglyphs; Egyptian ideas are found in some parts of the Bible; and Greek sciences and especially, art were originally influenced by Egypt. Finally, archaeology and historical writing have made Egypt a subject of great public interest, stimulating man ...
    Related: ancient egypt, egypt, modern western, western world, universe
  • Aristotle B 384 D 322 Bc, Was A Greek Philosopher, Logician, - 1,556 words
    Aristotle (b. 384 - d. 322 BC), was a Greek philosopher, logician, and scientist. Along with his teacher Plato, Aristotle is generally regarded as one of the most influential ancient thinkers in a number of philosophical fields, including political theory. Aristotle was born in Stagira in northern Greece, and his father was a court physician to the king of Macedon. As a young man he studied in Plato's Academy in Athens. After Plato's death he left Athens to conduct philosophical and biological research in Asia Minor and Lesbos, and he was then invited by King Philip II of Macedon to tutor his young son, Alexander the Great. Soon after Alexander succeeded his father, consolidated the conquest ...
    Related: aristotle, classical greek, greek, greek philosopher, human beings
  • Aristotle Hapiness Essay - 596 words
    Aristotle -Hapiness Essay Aristotle's view on the nature of human life: Is it correct? Essay written by Adrian from Gonzaga HS!! Is life really about the 'money', the 'cash', the 'hoes', who has the biggest gold chain or who drives the shiniest or fastest car, who sells the most albums or who has the most respect? Aristotle challenges views, which are similar to the ones held and shown by rap artists such as Jay-Z and the Notorious B.I.G., by observing that everything in the universe, including humans, has a telos, or goal in life. He states that the goal of a human life is to achieve happiness or eudaimonia. I believe that Aristotle is completely correct in his reasoning of the purpose of h ...
    Related: aristotle, human life, moral virtue, golden mean, pleasure
  • Aristotles Political Ideal - 1,155 words
    ... nt in nature, so he did not challenge the institution of slavery. Euripides and Alcidamas did in their thinking. Aristotle believed heavily in a graduated class system that would include such classes as agricultural workers, craftsmen, and paid laborers. The agricultural workers, Aristotle concludes, will be slaves, or non-Greeks, dwelling in the area surrounding the city. But the class most important to maintain the state, Aristotle refers to as the ruling class. This class will take care of the military and deliberative elements of the state. This is the ruling class that was previously discussed as the citizens of Aristotle's Ideal State. They would live neither a commercial life nor ...
    Related: ideal state, political theory, basic elements, modern western, workers
  • Aristotles View - 562 words
    Aristotle's View Aristotle's view Essay submitted by Patty Smith Is life really about the 'money', the 'cash', the 'hoes', who has the biggest gold chain or who drives the shiniest or fastest car, who sells the most albums or who has the most respect? Aristotle challenges views, which are similar to the ones held and shown by rap artists such as Jay-Z and the Notorious B.I.G., by observing that everything in the universe, including humans, has a telos, or goal in life. He states that the goal of a human life is to achieve happiness or eudaimonia. I believe that Aristotle is completely correct in his reasoning of the purpose of human nature. He even explains how happiness is different for eve ...
    Related: modern western, ideal state, golden mean, imperfect, submitted
  • Athens And Sparta The Culture - 1,029 words
    Athens And Sparta; The Culture Athens Athens was one of the first city-states. Each of these independent states consisted of a city and the region that surrounded it. Athens had a king, as did other Greek states. According to tradition, the first king of Athens was named Cecrops. Kings ruled the city-state until 682 B.C. Beginning that year, elected officials called archons headed the government of Athens. The general assembly, which consisted of all adult male citizens of Athens, elected the archons to one-year terms. After their term of office, the archons joined the Areopagus, a council of elder statesmen. The Areopagus judged murder trials and prepared political matters for the vote of t ...
    Related: athens, sparta, city states, greek state, eastern
  • Buddhism In America - 1,504 words
    ... themes appeal to many, Buddhist belief in using the mind to change our lives provides practical methods and exercises that we can use every day to change our perception of reality. "Rather than turning us away from what is best in Western Culture, Buddhism can help us return to it, for the west today is in the grip of a major cultural crisis of confidence."(Kulananda, 210) Buddhism has become so popular in the West, because it teaches one how to be happier and more aware by use of; seeing things as they are, living a sacred life, speaking the truth, loving, attention and focus on what is important to you, and meditation. These concepts work with us, because they are easily adaptable and ...
    Related: america, buddhism, people search, world today, lifestyle
  • China 2000 - 1,724 words
    China 2000 CHINA 2000 What is China? Is it maybe the image of the ancient times with the glorious old dynasties, the powerful emperors, the wondrous temples, the fascinating winding gardens? Or is it maybe a strict communist world with uniformed people wearing Mao suits and living in dreary gray concrete apartment blocks? Or perhaps it is the skyscrapers of Hong Kong and Shanghai, the horrendous traffic, the buzzing commotion, ultra modern electronics and plate glass buildings? In reality, China is all this in one. It is a land that intertwines a miraculous ancestral heritage with a capitalist reality blooming in the heart of a still surviving communist system. In todays China, the gigantic ...
    Related: china, mainland china, chinese people, ancient times, relics
  • Clash Of Civilizations - 2,243 words
    Clash Of Civilizations The Clash of Civilizations suggests that world politics is entering a new phase. It is his hypothesis that the fundamental source of conflict in the New World will not be primarily ideological or primarily economic. Huntington believes that the great divisions amongst humankind and the dominating source of conflict will be in the cultural form. Nation states will still remain the most powerful actors in world affairs, but the principal conflicts of global politics will occur between nations and groups of different civilizations. Huntington states: "The clash of civilizations will dominate global politics. The fault lines between civilizations will be the battle lines o ...
    Related: chinese civilization, clash, western civilization, economic systems, north america
  • Cultural Comparisons Ethnocentrism - 1,069 words
    Cultural Comparisons Ethnocentrism Culture Cultural comparisons Ethnocentrism Ethnocentrism is the name given to a tendency to interpret or evaluate other cultures in terms of one's own. This tendency has been, perhaps, more prevalent in modern nations than among preliterate tribes. The citizens of a large nation, especially in the past, have been less likely to observe people in another nation or culture than have been members of small tribes who are well acquainted with the ways of their culturally diverse neighbours. Thus, the American tourist could report that Londoners drive on the wrong side of the street or an Englishman might find some customs on the Continent queer or boorish, merel ...
    Related: cultural relativism, ethnocentrism, culturally diverse, wind power, acquisition
  • Drama Of Ancient Greece - 1,481 words
    Drama Of Ancient Greece Final Paper: Drama of Ancient Greece The Greek dramatists have bequeathed immensely to the current mode of modern Western literature. Shakespeare and his contemporaries revered them for their distinct and explicit language, their dramatic scenes, and their extravagant processions. The language of their stories has connoted itself into both, the Western dialect and Western literature in general. The establishment of Ancient Greek culture that has left the most immutable impression on our current world is the myth. The many mortal heroes who are seen throughout the extensive deployment of myths are accompanied by the ostentatious and mighty immortals, led by Zeus in the ...
    Related: ancient greece, drama, greece, children first, the odyssey
  • Eating Disorders - 1,091 words
    Eating Disorders It is not surprising that eating disorders are on the increase due to the value society places on being thin. In modern Western culture, women are given the message at a very young age that in order to be happy and successful, they must be thin. Every time you walk into a store you are surrounded by the images of emaciated models that appear on the front cover of fashion magazines. Women are constantly bombarded with advertisements catering to what is considered desirable. Thousands of women and girls are starving themselves this very minute trying to attain what the fashion industry considers to be the ideal waif-like figure. During this paper I will mainly be discussing th ...
    Related: disorders, eating disorder, eating disorders, economic conditions, fashion industry
  • France Was An Absolute Monarchy Louis Xiv 1643 1715 Was The Envy Of All Other Rulers In Europe During His Reign He Had Centra - 2,482 words
    ... French people under one banner. Many of the members of the Legislative Assembly believed that France would unite under one banner to defend itself. On April 20th 1792, the French Legislative Assembly charged Austria with plotting aggression and declared war, starting the first War of the Peoples in the modern world. This was followed by a French invasion of the Austrian Netherlands and two months later the King of Prussia joined Austria in the struggle against France. The French Forces were quickly overcome by the Austrian Forces in Belgium and were driven back into France. The Duke of Brunswick that issued a manifesto saying that Paris would be burnt to the ground if the Royal family we ...
    Related: absolute, envy, france, louis, louis xiv, louis xvi, monarchy
  • Gender As A Socially Constructed Accomplishment - 1,493 words
    Gender As A Socially Constructed Accomplishment Elliott Yousefzadeh Sociology 1 Essay 3 Gender As A Socially Constructed Accomplishment Gender is a very strange topic in todays society. Many people dont know what to do with people who are transvestites or transsexuals and they often times hate them because they are different. People always think that there can only be two types of gender: masculine and feminine. People also feel that these genders most always correspond to a persons sex. So if the person is a male, then most people wouldnt accept that person into society if they acted feminine. For human beings there is no essential femaleness and maleness, femininity or masculinity, womanho ...
    Related: accomplishment, gender, gender identity, socially, socially constructed
  • Hermaphrodite - 1,186 words
    Hermaphrodite Intro to Women's Studies Wsp 101 What is a hermaphrodite? The definition that Suzanne Kessler, The writer of Lessons from the Intersexed, gives us is that a true hermaphrodite is where a baby has either testes or ovaries, but the genitals are indistinct. This birth defect has been happening to a small percentage of babies throughout history ( ). A lot of Kessler's essay deals with the interviewing of six medical experts in the field of pediatric intersexuality. They supply the reader with plenty of information on the topic of intersexuality and babies born with ambiguous genitals. Kessler also supplies us with a great deal of information on the process parents have to go throug ...
    Related: hermaphrodite, social status, modern western, gender identity, insight
  • History Of Communication - 1,265 words
    History Of Communication [an error occurred while processing this directive] History Of Communication Since the beginning of time, people have had the need to communicate with one and other. The most common type of communication is speech, but you could not talk to someone who lived 20 miles away. Then written language was developed, people marked symbols on paper, stone, or whatever was available. Then hundreds of years passed, and people who wanted to share their ideas with people had to do allot of writing, until someone thought to make a writing machine. This machine is called the printing press. Gutenberg's invention of the printing press is widely thought of as the origin of mass commu ...
    Related: history, mass communication, modern communication, general public, deaf people
  • Hitlers Willing Executioners - 1,698 words
    ... s, and were cognizant and comfortable with the actions of the battalion. Following a particularly successful operation of hunting down and murdering Jews, the Battalion would put up score sheets of their prowess. To be taken on a mission to kill Jews was often considered to be a reward. Many genocidal missions were to be staffed voluntarily by the members of the Battalion. These missions never suffered from lack of volunteers. The members of the battalion simply enjoyed these operations, and they did it for the future of Germany. Chapter 9:Police Battalions: Lives, Killings, and Motives This is the authors attempt to understand the actions of battalion members when they were not engaged ...
    Related: american political, political science, modern western, score, capture
  • Over And Underfamiliarity With Matthew - 937 words
    Over And Underfamiliarity With Matthew Over and Underfamiliarity with Matthew 6:11 Hearing something repeatedly can diminish its significance. I suspect that this is particularly true of Scripture. Overfamiliarity with a biblical passage can contribute to its misunderstanding. Sometimes it can reduce a profound saying to nothing more than a clich. The Lord's Prayer (Mt. 6:9-13) ranks among the most popular passages in the New Testament. Most people who regularly attend a church can recite it from memory. It is a prayer that we have heard and said many times. One of the more memorable lines of the prayer is Give us this day our daily bread (Mt. 6:11). Let us pause for a moment and consider th ...
    Related: matthew, food market, self awareness, research foundation, caring
  • Social Recognition Of The Human Individual - 1,217 words
    ... the 1848 revolutions failed because they lacked the support of the militaries, but they were clear evidence that the rising urban middle class of Europe was beginning to find its identity in their respective cultures. This was a key stage in the metamorphosis fraternity was undergoing in order to become the most potent political force of the period from 1850 to 1918, nationalism. Here the industrial revolution plays a key role in the evolution of fraternity. As the aforementioned monolithic, industrial infrastructures were raised all around Europe, an individual citizen of such a large system motivated only by the guilt of his Protestant work ethic loses his feelings of purpose or signi ...
    Related: human behavior, human development, individual level, recognition, social structure
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