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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: modern warfare

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  • A Comparsion Between Modern Day Soilders And Medieval Knights - 448 words
    A Comparsion Between Modern Day Soilders And Medieval Knights In Medieval Times, A Knight was a mounted man-at-arms of medieval Europe. He served a king or other feudal superior, usually in return for the tenure of a tract of land, but sometimes he served his lord for money. The knight was generally a man of noble birth who had served in the lower ranks as page and squire before being ceremoniously inducted into knighthood by his superior. At his induction the knight usually swore to be brave, loyal, and courteous and to protect the defenseless. After the 15th century, knighthood was conferred on civilians as a reward for public services. A knight in armor would present a very strange appear ...
    Related: knights, medieval, medieval europe, medieval times, modern warfare, the knight
  • All Quiet Western Front - 1,362 words
    All Quiet Western Front Annonymous By: Remarque Nationalism can be defined as having a sense of belonging and loyalty to ones country or nation state. Of all the European nations, France was the first to sport the idea of nationalism. Many countries became influenced by the French's ideas of nationali sm, As a result nationalism had spread throught out Europe by the nineteenth and twenteth century. One result that nationalisn had on Europe was, the wanting of unification. The people of nation states wanted their country to belong to. This wanting lea d to the unfying of Italy and Germany. Soon nationalism had increased the peoples confidedence., and a feeling of imperialism ran through the u ...
    Related: all quiet on the western front, quiet, paul baumer, world war i, injured
  • Catch 22 - 1,233 words
    Catch 22 Joseph Heller satirizes, among other matters, red tape and bureaucracy in his first novel, Catch-22. The novel concerns itself with a World War II bombardier named Yossarian who suddenly realizes the danger of his position and tries various means to extricate himself from further missions. Yossarian is driven crazy by the Germans, who keep shooting at him when he drops bombs on them, and by his American superiors, who seem less concerned about winning the war than they are about getting promoted. Heller spent eight years writing Catch-22, is a former student at three universities--New York, Columbia and Oxford--and a former teacher at Pennsylvania State College. From 1942 to 1945 he ...
    Related: catch, catch 22, mediterranean sea, world war ii, raising
  • Its The End Of The Worldand I Feel Fine - 1,539 words
    It's The End Of The World...And I Feel Fine Elspeth Wilson Politics & Film Final Paper December 15, 2000 It's the End of the World ... and I Feel Fine! (The role of intellectuals in the creation and justification of nuclear weapons.) In Fail Safe and Dr. Strangelove, Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, Sidney Lumet and Stanley Kubrick question the relationship between technology and humanity by emphasizing mankind's tendency to create machines that cannot be adequately controlled. By blatantly revealing the absurdity of game theory (Mutual Assured Destruction as a reasonable deterrence for nuclear war), both directors call into question the dominant pro-Cold War American id ...
    Related: nuclear warfare, foreign policy, scientific theory, minimal, surprise
  • Kurt Vonnegut: A Canary In A Coal Mine - 1,197 words
    Kurt Vonnegut: A Canary in a Coal Mine Kurt Vonnegut Served as a sensitive cell in the organism of American Society during the 1960's. His work alerted the public about the absurdity of modern warfare and an increasingly mechanized and impersonal society in which humans were essentially worthless and degenerated. The satirical tone and sardonic humor allowed people to read his works and laugh at their own misfortune. Vonnegut was born on November 11, 1922, in Indianapolis, where he was reared. His father was an architect, as his grandfather had been. Though the family's fortune was eroded during the Depression-his father went without an architectural commission from 1929 to 1940-they were we ...
    Related: coal, kurt, kurt vonnegut, mine, mark twain
  • Kurt Vonnegut: A Canary In A Coal Mine - 1,197 words
    Kurt Vonnegut: A Canary in a Coal Mine Kurt Vonnegut Served as a sensitive cell in the organism of American Society during the 1960's. His work alerted the public about the absurdity of modern warfare and an increasingly mechanized and impersonal society in which humans were essentially worthless and degenerated. The satirical tone and sardonic humor allowed people to read his works and laugh at their own misfortune. Vonnegut was born on November 11, 1922, in Indianapolis, where he was reared. His father was an architect, as his grandfather had been. Though the family's fortune was eroded during the Depression-his father went without an architectural commission from 1929 to 1940-they were we ...
    Related: coal, kurt, kurt vonnegut, mine, public relations
  • Kurt Vonnegut: A Canary In A Coal Mine - 1,197 words
    Kurt Vonnegut: A Canary in a Coal Mine Kurt Vonnegut Served as a sensitive cell in the organism of American Society during the 1960's. His work alerted the public about the absurdity of modern warfare and an increasingly mechanized and impersonal society in which humans were essentially worthless and degenerated. The satirical tone and sardonic humor allowed people to read his works and laugh at their own misfortune. Vonnegut was born on November 11, 1922, in Indianapolis, where he was reared. His father was an architect, as his grandfather had been. Though the family's fortune was eroded during the Depression-his father went without an architectural commission from 1929 to 1940-they were we ...
    Related: coal, kurt, kurt vonnegut, mine, george orwell
  • Leonardo Da Vinci - 1,339 words
    Leonardo Da Vinci Leonardo DA Vinci (1452-1519), Florentine artist, one of the great masters of high Renaissance, celebrated as a painter, sculptor, architect, engineer, and scientist. His profound love of knowledge and research was the keynote of both his scientific and artistic endeavors. His innovations in the field of painting influenced the course of Italian art for more than a century after his death, and his scientific studies, particularly in the fields of anatomy, optics, and hydraulics. He anticipated many of the developments of modern science. Leonardo was born in the small town of Vinci, in Tuscany, near Florence. He was the son of a wealthy Florentine notary and a peasant woman. ...
    Related: leonardo, leonardo da vinci, vinci, vinci leonardo, european history
  • Sixteen Most Significant Events In Us History Between 1789 To 1975 - 4,414 words
    ... saster. The reversal of many of the gains achieved by workers combined with the reduction of taxes on the rich, created a problem in the economy that would go unnoticed. In addition, the availability of credit led to reckless spending which would further endanger the economy. This unequal distribution of wealth combined with a free spending attitude weakened the economy and led to the Great Depression. The discussion continues with bracket IV, which covers the time period 1940-1975 and pairs the number one seed in the bracket "The Vietnam War" against fourth seed "World War II". The second seed in the bracket "The Cuban Missile Crisis" is paired against the third seed "The Civil Rights A ...
    Related: american history, history, significant events, significant impact, sixteen, states history, u.s. history
  • Spanishamerican War - 1,458 words
    ... ppropriation of this money for specific purposes. That not a single man was found to make objection showed a very great capacity for united action in a time of emergency. It also showed, of course, how great is the confidence that Congress and the American people repose in the honor, wisdom, and public spirit of their Presidents. At the time of the Venezuela incident, Congress in similar manner, came unanimously to the support of President Cleveland. In that case, however, there was not the remotest possibility of war; and the episode was merely a diplomatic one in which it was deemed important to show that our government could rely absolutely upon the whole support of the people. The So ...
    Related: triple alliance, navy department, american people, expensive, wisdom
  • Spartan Warfare Sparta In The 7th Century Bc A New Era Of Warfare Strategy Evolved Before This New Strategy, Foot Soldiers Kn - 1,228 words
    Spartan Warfare Sparta In the 7th Century BC a new era of warfare strategy evolved. Before this new strategy, foot soldiers (known as hoplites) engaged in battle in the form of one mob for each army which on the command of their generals runs at each other and proceeds to hack blindly at the enemy with little to no direction other then to kill the enemy in front of them. This proved to be very messy and the tide of battle depended mostly on emotion and size of an army. In the name of strategy and organization, the phalanx was developed. A phalanx is simply defined as a line formation with its width significantly larger then its depth. The depth of the phalanx is a variable which some suggest ...
    Related: foot, military strategy, modern warfare, sparta, strategy, warfare
  • The Boer War - 1,254 words
    ... her camps established later in the War. Eventually there were 50 camps, in which about 136 000 people were interned. The families were conveyed to the camps by ox-wagon, trolley or railway train - usually in open coal- or cattle trucks without any sanitary arrangements - or they even marched on foot. No proper provision had been made for their housing. Numbers of them had at first to make shift in the open until tents were provided, or were held in the camps. Those who did not receive tents were, according to the report of the British commission of inquiry: "placed, in every conceivable kind of dwelling, from a church vestry, hotel and store to a blacksmith's forge". In the opinion of th ...
    Related: boer, boer war, british army, kansas city, disposal
  • The Guns Of August - 1,096 words
    The Guns Of August The Guns of August Barbara Tuchman's Pulitzer prize-winning book about the start of World War I is a fascinating and detailed work that delivers the thoughts and actions of the belligerents and their previously mysterious leaders to life on every page. This military history of the first month of the war is written in a way as to keep the reader interested because of the great detail. The author also manages to write about the events in such a manor as the reader sees them as they happened. Despite any previous knowledge about the historical events of the war, the book manages to keep you wondering if the Germans will succeed in its aims. In Chapters 5 through 9, Tuchman do ...
    Related: guns, brief discussion, military history, world war i, strategic
  • Ulysses S Grant - 1,097 words
    Ulysses S. Grant Ulysses S. Grant Ulysses S. Grant was an American general and 18th president of the U.S. Grant was born in Point Pleasant, Ohio, on April 27, 1822, the son of Hannah Simpson and Jesse Grant, the owner of a tannery. Taken to nearby Georgetown at the age of one, he was educated in local and boarding schools. In 1839, under the name of Ulysses Simpson instead of his original Hiram Ulysses, he was appointed to West Point. Graduating 21st in a class of 39 in 1843, he was assigned to Jefferson Barracks, Missouri. There he met Julia Dent, a local planter's daughter, whom he married after the Mexican War. During the Mexican War, Grant served under both General Zachary Taylor and Gen ...
    Related: grant, ulysses, ulysses s. grant, president andrew johnson, american civil war
  • World War I Powers - 1,564 words
    World War I Powers During World War I many different types of weapons were utilized by both the Allied and Central powers. Some were variations on older models of weaponry, and others were totally new inventions created to aid in the wartime effort. Most of the new weapons were used as killing machines in trench warfare, which was practiced during World War I, while others were employed as tools of espionage, scouting land areas, or air and sea warfare. Communication also played a major role in World War I, especially the newly invented short wave radio. My report will discuss several of these new types of weaponry and communication; their uses in the war and their technical make-up. Ground ...
    Related: central powers, world war i, world war ii, modern warfare, chemical warfare
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