Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: modern life

  • 79 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>
  • A Connecticut Yankee In King Arthurs Court By Mark Twain 1835 1910 - 1,787 words
    A Connecticut Yankee In King Arthur's Court by Mark Twain (1835 - 1910) A Connecticut Yankee In King Arthur's Court by Mark Twain (1835 - 1910) Type of Work: Social satire Setting England; 6th-century, during the reign Of King Arthur Principal Characters Hank Morgan, the Connecticut Yankee "Boss"; in reality a 19th-century mechanic King Arthur, King of England Merlin, Arthur's court magician Sandy, Hank's sixth-century wife Story Overveiw Hank Morgan, born in Hartford, Connecticut, was head superintendent at a vast arms factory. There he had the means to create anything - guns, revolvers, cannons, boilers, engines, and all sorts of labor-saving machinery. If there wasn't already a quick, new ...
    Related: a connecticut yankee in king arthur's court, connecticut, connecticut yankee, king arthur, mark, mark twain, twain
  • Abortion And Society - 1,071 words
    ... would be favored by male society. Other criticism claims that women who are opposed to abortion do so because they value human well being and those politicians who seek to outlaw abortion come in the name of "family values" (Saarni, 115). Thus pro-choice isnt seen as a stance, which is concerned, about the well being of people. In a quest to establish a womans choice the government is viewed as a powerful entity. Perhaps the issue of choice should be left to the individual instead of the state (Wennberg, 82). In my opinion the right to bear children or not shouldnt be just a womans decision. Why must womens liberation be related to her independent choice and not with a socially intellect ...
    Related: abortion, abortion controversy, personal opinion, most dangerous, burden
  • Air Pollution - 1,981 words
    Air Pollution (name, title) Executive Summary An evaluation of the implications of environmental air pollution on human life and the macro, meso and micro level steps being taken to change the current status of air pollution is the purpose of this site. The method of analysis used involved researching the actual hazards of air pollution on humans, what solutions government agencies have proposed/implemented (macro), what steps cities across the United States have taken (meso) and how you (micro) can take a step toward solving the air pollution problem. The conclusion I have drawn from this research is that with the abundance of evidence supporting the idea that air pollution has become a ser ...
    Related: air pollution, pollution, pollution problem, african american, government agencies
  • Alice And Rabbit Hole - 828 words
    Alice And Rabbit Hole Like Alice tumbling down the rabbit hole, we don't know where things will lead us. Perpetually falling, landing, trying t claw our way up the slick metallic walls only to lose our grips and fall back into the blackness, on our way back to wonderland. But sadly we never quit get there. I wonder to myself. What are we getting accomplished? Why live just to die? And why do things go so drastically wrong, and then again maybe there not. In this man made and mechanized new wonderland there are now a lot more rabbit holes than the one Alice followed the little white rabbit down. They just come in different shades now. Like different flavors of candy. Inside the hole lies a wo ...
    Related: alice, hole, rabbit, modern life, blue dress
  • Art - 517 words
    Art Question: Write and answer the question of your choice. I decided to write my essay about art because I knew I could write sincerely about the subject, rather than something which I had no true emotions about. Art is an important facet of the American culture. Discuss an experience that you have had with art. To see a scorned, beaten, and crucified man lying dead in the arms of his mother is an image which can inspire overwhelming emotions within the heart of an observer. Yet, for the longest time I've had such difficulty looking at Michelangelo's Piet or any piece of art in this way. To me, art has never been about expressing oneself or conveying a message to others, but simply creating ...
    Related: modern life, american culture, motion, realism
  • Baroque Style - 658 words
    Baroque Style Baroque Style The Baroque style was a style in which the art and artists of the time focused upon details, and intricate designs. During this time the portraits began to portray modern life, and artists turned their backs on classical tradition. Buildings were more elaborate and ornately decorated. These works of art created history and altered the progress of Western Civilization. The progress has been an uneven one. Regression and progress often alternated, and shifts in direction often occurred. Art, architecture, literature, and historical events shaped the ideas of the era we know today. Architecture such as the palace of Versailles, and artists like Caravaggio, Rembrandt, ...
    Related: baroque, baroque period, francisco goya, divine intervention, transition
  • Beat Poets - 696 words
    Beat Poets The Beat Movement in modern literature has become an important period in the history of literature and society in America. Incorporating influences such as jazz, art, literature, philosophy and religion, the beat writers created a new and prophetic vision of modern life and changed the way a generation of people sees the world. That generation is mow aging and its representative voices are becoming lost to eternity, but the message is alive and well. The Beats have forever altered the nature of American consciousness. The Beat Generation of writers offered the world a new attitude. They brought to society a consciousness of life worth living. They offered a method of escape from t ...
    Related: beat, beat generation, poets, corporate world, pop music
  • Beowulf - 545 words
    Beowulf The oldest English epic, Beowulf, although composed twelve centuries ago, uses many of the same ideals and values that exist in modern life and modern literature. These attributes are still important, but they do not occupy every aspect of life as in Anglo- Saxon England. Some of the ideals have little use today, such as fate, while other virtues, such as loyalty, are encouraged and highly respected traits. Other values, like fame, have taken on bad connotations in modern day and are not esteemed as they once were. Fate, the idea that destiny is predetermined and nothing can be done to change that, was highly esteemed in Beowulfs time, but is of little use today. Anglo-Saxon warriors ...
    Related: beowulf, modern life, modern society, mass communication, christian
  • Blithe Spirit By Noel Coward - 997 words
    Blithe Spirit By Noel Coward Blithe Spirit written by Noel Coward was first published in 1941. Noel Coward was known for his sophisticated comedies of modern life (Seymour, Smith 261). It is sophisticated yet hilarious to the readers. Seymour and Smith stated that Cowards plays, "are within their admittedly-but unashamedly-extremely narrow limits, accurate truthful, cynical and funny"(261). It is one of the greatest farces ever written. Blithe Spirit is the story of Charles Condomine who loses his wife, Elvira, at a young age. Charles remarries a lady named Ruth. The couple decides to have a sйance to get some ideas for a novel that Charles is in the process of writing. After the s ...
    Related: coward, noel, modern life, henry holt, universe
  • Booker T Washingtin And Web Du Bois - 736 words
    Booker T. Washingtin And W.E.B. Du Bois During the time between 1877 and 1915, black Americans experiences many social and economic and political difficulties. Many African Americans supported the program of Booker T. Washington, the most prominent black leader of the late 19th and early 20th century, who counseled them to focus on modest economic goals and to accept temporary social discrimination. Others, led by the African-American intellectual W.E.B. Du Bois, wanted to challenge segregation through political action. Washington and Du Bois both have valid strategies; Washington believing that blacks could advance themselves faster through hard work than by demands for equal rights, Du Boi ...
    Related: bois, booker, booker t washington, booker t. washington, equal rights
  • Brave New World - 1,458 words
    Brave New World Book Report of 'Brave New World' By Michael Tillman Theme: The theme of Brave New World is freedom and how people want it. The people want poetry, danger, good and bad things. This novel shows that when you must give up religion, high art, true science, family, love and other foundations of modern life in place of a sort of unending happiness, it is not worth the sacrifice. These are all also distinguishing marks between humans and animals that were abolished here. In exchange, they received stability with no wars, social unrest, no poverty or disease or any other infirmities or discomforts. However, they only live with an artificial happiness, which they have been brainwashe ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, world book, mustapha mond, central london
  • Charles Dickens - 1,908 words
    Charles Dickens Charles Dickens Charles John Huffam Dickens is the greatest English writer that ever lived. He was one of the most popular writers in the history of literature. Surely no English author is so well known and so widely read, translated and remembered as Charles Dickens. He fame is well deserved. From the pen of this great author came such characters as Oliver Twist, David Copperfield, Bob Cratchit and Tiny Tim, Mr. Pickwick, and Little Nett. Dickens was born on February 7, 1812, in Portsmouth and spent most of his childhood in London and Kent, both of which appear frequently in his novels. Charles Dickens was the son of John and Elizabeth Dickens. John Dickens worked as a clerk ...
    Related: charles dickens, walt disney, daily news, working class, amendment
  • Christianity Crisis - 2,306 words
    Christianity Crisis There was a time, not long ago, when the evangelical community had considerable consensus on lifestyle questions and social issues. We generally agreed on what we should eat and drink and how we might spend our weekends. There was little debate over definitions of vulgarity or morality, and questions of fashion were rarely a matter for discussion. In those days, everyone knew how a family should be raised, and aberrations such as divorce and abortion were simply that: problems found only among hose outside the fold. All of that has changed. Today there is considerable disagreement on such questions, and where there is not disagreement, there is often a reluctant silence o ...
    Related: christianity, crisis, modern life, super bowl, guiding
  • Christianity Crisis - 2,296 words
    ... ss supportive of traditional parenting skills. This is especially true of younger evangelicals, for example, who tend to share society's view that a working mother can have just as secure a relationship with a child as a mother who does not work. A culture of traditional, shared meanings is strained by the explosion of new symbols generated by modernity and supported by the mass media. Words traditionally deemed to be profane or vulgar are now commonplace. Even the accepted definitions of life and death have been reinterpreted by modern symbolic meanings. The person is left to choose among the offered symbols and the cultural lifestyles they represent. A Crisis of Concepts In a tradition ...
    Related: christianity, crisis, modern corporation, social science, dictionary
  • Clause And Effect: Antihomosexual Laws - 952 words
    Clause and Effect: Anti-Homosexual Laws $115 Designer Cosmetic Collection From Cosmetique -- Only $1! Clause and Effect: Anti-Homosexual Laws "In Edinburgh, a homosexual man is four times more likely to be attacked than a heterosexual man." This fact has been iterated so much by the media over the past few weeks that it would be a challenge to find one Scot who could not quote it accurately. One would think that this alarming statistic could be greatly improved if people were educated from an early age in the aspects of homosexuality, and taught, even if not to agree with it, at least to be tolerating towards it. Why, then, is there such an opposition to the repealing of Section 28 of the Lo ...
    Related: clause, family relationship, adolf hitler, hate crimes, destructive
  • Critics On Slaughter Housefive - 865 words
    CRITICS ON SLAUGHTER HOUSE-FIVE Slaughter house-Five, written by Kurt Vonnegut is a post modern novel, attempting to undermine the reader's expectations. The novel does not have smooth transitions from one event to the next. The reason is, because the novel reflects modern man's life. Since the novel is not smooth it is confusing. This is just like modern man's life, confusing. Another literary device is, it is difficult to follow. When the novel is hard to read the reader cannot enjoy and understand the book. This is how modern society is too(difficult to follow). Another literary device is the novel's characters lack depth. The characters need more descriptive details. This reflects man by ...
    Related: slaughter, slaughter house, literary device, modern life, correspondent
  • Critics On Slaughter Housefive - 865 words
    CRITICS ON SLAUGHTER HOUSE-FIVE Slaughter house-Five, written by Kurt Vonnegut is a post modern novel, attempting to undermine the reader's expectations. The novel does not have smooth transitions from one event to the next. The reason is, because the novel reflects modern man's life. Since the novel is not smooth it is confusing. This is just like modern man's life, confusing. Another literary device is, it is difficult to follow. When the novel is hard to read the reader cannot enjoy and understand the book. This is how modern society is too(difficult to follow). Another literary device is the novel's characters lack depth. The characters need more descriptive details. This reflects man by ...
    Related: slaughter, slaughter house, different situations, kurt vonnegut, modernism
  • Critics On Slaughter Housefive Slaughter Housefive, Written By Kurt Vonnegut Is A Post Modern Novel, Attempting To Undermine - 865 words
    CRITICS ON SLAUGHTER HOUSE-FIVE Slaughter house-Five, written by Kurt Vonnegut is a post modern novel, attempting to undermine the reader's expectations. The novel does not have smooth transitions from one event to the next. The reason is, because the novel reflects modern man's life. Since the novel is not smooth it is confusing. This is just like modern man's life, confusing. Another literary device is, it is difficult to follow. When the novel is hard to read the reader cannot enjoy and understand the book. This is how modern society is too(difficult to follow). Another literary device is the novel's characters lack depth. The characters need more descriptive details. This reflects man by ...
    Related: attempting, kurt, kurt vonnegut, modern life, modern society, post modern, slaughter
  • Critique Of Godspell - 849 words
    Critique Of Godspell Theatre Critique On the night of April 19, 2000, I attended Godspell, written by John-Michael Tebelak, and produced by the Gainesville Alliance Theatre. It was a musical based on the gospel according to St. Matthew. The director chose to add a modern twist to the classic production. The beginning began with us--mothers too busy for anything other than work, the alcoholic, a child without her father, children captivated by video games and rock star boys--everyday people with problems and obsessions. Everyone was too busy and blinded by their sin to stop and pay attention to what is most important. We have multiplied our possessions, but reduced our values. / We talk too m ...
    Related: critique, modern america, john michael, jesus christ, steep
  • Cults Jonestown: The Terror Within - 1,055 words
    Cults - Jonestown: The Terror Within Jonestown: The Terror Within. Cults have existed throughout history since the beginning of time. A cult is defined in Webster's dictionary as a "system of religious worship with a devoted attachment to a person, principle, etc." Over the past thirty years numerous religious cults have caused " tens of thousands to abandon their families, friends, education's, and careers to follow the teaching of a leader they will never meet"(Beck 78). Opinions vary as to why people are drawn to cults. "Martin Marty, professor of religious history at the University of Chicago, attributes the growth of cults to the frustrations of seemingly rootless people"(U.S. News and ...
    Related: religious cult, terror, family ties, nursing home, devoted
  • 79 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>