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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: modern art

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  • Modernism - 2,351 words
    ... A scandalized contemporary critic declared Matisse and his fellow artistsAndr Derain, Maurice de Vlaminck, and Georges Braque (of France), and Kees van Dongen (of the Netherlands)to be fauves (French for wild beasts). This derogatory term became the name of their movement. Fauvism lasted only from about 1898 to 1908, but it had an enduring impact on 20th-century art. [ ] B. Cubism [ ] Print section [ ] Pablo Picasso, a friend and rival of Matisse, also invented a new style of painting, focusing mainly on line rather than color. Picasso's art changed radically around 1907, when he decided to incorporate some stylistic elements of African sculpture into his paintings. Unlike Matisse's plea ...
    Related: modernism, folk art, interior design, human body, square
  • Modernist Art In Europe 191025 By Robert L Herbert - 460 words
    Modernist Art in Europe 1910-25 by Robert l. Herbert Herberts thesis of his essay is to investigate the arrival of the machine and modern art and its complexities. During WWI, modernist painting and sculpture paid major attention to machinery, science and industry. Modern art during that time has become a central factor in our culture due to its dominance in public art, museums, media and literature. Herbert brings in background information and stated the avant-garde of Pisarro, van Gogh, Monet, Renoir, etc. The industrial revolution had a stronger grip on society during the 19th century, and during this time, modern art was associated with primitive nature. During the rise of industrial art ...
    Related: herbert, modernist, avant garde, urban life, embrace
  • Nazi Art - 1,056 words
    Nazi Art Many people know that Adolph Hitler was an artist in his youth as an Austrian, but just how much art played a role in the National Socialist Germany seems to get underrated in the history books. Just as a racial war was waged against the Jewish population and the military fought the French and the Slavic people, an artistic cleansing for the Germanic culture was in progress. Special Nazi units were searching the ancient arts of antiquity for evidence of a great Germanic race that existed well before history. Hitler had monuments and museums built on a grand scale with carefully designed architecture that would last a thousand years. Art of this nature was a priority because Hitler w ...
    Related: nazi, nazi party, modern art, adolph hitler, bauhaus
  • Nazi Art As Propaganda - 1,175 words
    ... d by the swastika) bring light and order to chaos. This is a simplistic glorified portrayal of Hitler, constructed to initiate a sense of awe within those that saw it, and encouraged a link between Hitler and religion. Another painting that uses a similar tactic is Hermann Otto Hoyers In the Beginning Was the Word in which Hitler is again linked to God through his words of power. These paintings act to legitimize the power of the National socialists by equating Hitler with the righteousness of God, and construct a pseudo-religion to be followed without question. Hitler as a superior being is also illustrated in Lanzingers The Flag Bearer. The painting portrays Hitler (the leader and repr ...
    Related: nazi, nazi germany, nazi ideology, nazi party, propaganda
  • On Salvador Dali - 1,362 words
    On Salvador Dali Salvador Dali, was born Salvador Felipe Jacinto Dali i Domenech at 8:45 a.m., Monday, 11 May 1904, in the small town, in the foothills of the Pyrenees, of Figueres, Spain, approximately sixteen miles from the French border in the principality of Catalonia. His parents supported his talent and built him his first studio, while he was still a child, in their summer home. Dali went on to attend the San Fernando Academy of Fine Arts in Madrid, Spain, was married to Gala Eluard in 1934 and died on 23 January 1989 in a hospital in the town he born. Dali did not limit himself to one particular style or medium. Beginning with his early impressionistic work going into his surrealisti ...
    Related: dali, salvador, salvador dali, human condition, madrid spain
  • Oskar Kokoschka - 984 words
    Oskar Kokoschka Oskar Kokoschka Kokoschka was born in P^chlarn, a Danube town, on March 1, 1886. He studied at the Vienna School of Arts and Crafts from 1905 to 1908. As an early exponent of the avant-garde expressionist movement, he began to paint psychologically penetrating portraits of Viennese physicians, architects, and artists. Among these works are Hans Tietze and Erica Tietze-Conrat (1909, Museum of Modern Art, New York City), August Forel (1910, Mannheim Art Gallery, Germany), and Self-Portrait (1913, Museum of Modern Art). Kokoschka was wounded in World War I (1914-1918) and diagnosed as psychologically unstable. He taught art at the Dresden Academy from 1919 to 1924. During this t ...
    Related: oskar, czech republic, military service, after world, music
  • Pablo Picasso And His Artistic Life - 1,403 words
    ... 1973. Bibliography Pablo picasso And his Artistic Life A report by terra hardman Introduction Pablo Picasso was a Spanish painter and sculptor, generally considered the greatest artist of the 20th century. He was unique as an inventor of forms, as an innovator of styles and techniques, as a master of various media, and as one of the most prolific artists in history. He created more than 20,000 works. Picasso's genius manifested itself early: at the age of 10 he made his first paintings, and at 15 he performed brilliantly on the entrance examinations to Barcelona's School of Fine Arts. Family life Born in Mlaga on October 25, 1881, Picasso was the son of Jos Ruiz Blasco, an art teacher, a ...
    Related: artistic, family life, pablo, pablo picasso, picasso
  • Pablo Picasso Changed The Way We Look At Art - 1,314 words
    Pablo Picasso Changed The Way We Look At Art Muldoon 1 Picasso Changed the Way We Look at Art There is no abstract art. You must always start with something. Afterwards you can remove all traces of reality. -Pablo Picasso Picasso had not always been so enlightened with the fact that there was more to art than the eye could see. During the course of his ninety-one year life, Picasso encountered many ideas and people that helped form the wonderfully talented and brilliant artist in history. Picasso was born Pablo Ruiz on October 25th 1881, in Malaga, Spain. His father was a inspiring artist while his mother took care of the house. Picasso had shown a great artistic talent in his early childhoo ...
    Related: maria picasso, pablo, pablo picasso, picasso, blue period
  • Pablo Picassos Bequest Of Gertrude - 1,678 words
    Pablo Picasso's Bequest Of Gertrude Pablo Picasso was a very famous artist in his time. I have always found his work very interesting and unique. He has a style all his own and, I believe that this was what made him so famous and at the same time controversial. The painting I have chosen is called "Gertrude". Pablo Picasso was born in Spain to Jose Ruiz and Maria Picasso. He later adopted his mother's more distinguished maiden name Picasso. Picasso was a child prodigy who was recognized as such by his art-teacher father who ably led him along. Picasso was taught for a few years and after he attended the Academy of fine art in Curna Spain where his father taught. Picasso's early drawings such ...
    Related: gertrude, gertrude stein, maria picasso, pablo, pablo picasso
  • Paul Klee - 1,556 words
    Paul Klee A Swiss-born painter and graphic artist whose personal, often gently humorous works are replete with allusions to dreams, music, and poetry, Paul Klee, b. Dec. 18, 1879, d. June 29, 1940, is difficult to classify. Primitive art, surrealism, cubism, and children's art all seem blended into his small-scale, delicate paintings, watercolors, and drawings. His family was very interested in the arts. The jobs that Paul's parents had were strange for 1879. His mom helped support the family by giving piano lessons. His father did the housework. He cooked, cleaned, and painted. Paul's grandma taught him how to paint. After much hesitation he chose to study art, not music, and he attended th ...
    Related: francisco goya, york city, early christian, grandma, combine
  • Pop Art - 446 words
    Pop Art "Pop art" is a term used to describe popular art, the word popular meaning everyday life. Pop art also varied greatly, from soup cans to comic book art to abstract art. Pop artistis often have "satirical or playful intents." This would mean that a pop artist tries to express himself through humorous art. An early pop artist was Andy Warhol, who is known for his drawing of a can of soup.He was American and was born in 1928. He died in 1987. His works can be found at the Whitney museum of American Art and at the Museum of Modern Art. Another American pop artist was Roy Lichenstein. He was born in 1923 and is still living. His work can also be found at the Whitney Museum of modern art a ...
    Related: popular art, comic book, american art, magna
  • Resurrection And Christ - 1,076 words
    Resurrection And Christ Resurrection & Christ. Extended Written Response. For many centuries, artists throughout the world have aimed to capture and portray a particular theme or subject in accordance to their religious beliefs, personal influences, and mood, or based entirely upon societal influences. The figure of Christ and the manner in which he has been depicted has varied immensely over the years, which is highly indicative of changing social attitudes. Piero della Francescas Resurrection of 1463, and Julie Rraps Christ of 1984, have each depicted a Christ like figure in a way that illustrates their personal beliefs and also reflects the publics stance regarding the depiction of Christ ...
    Related: christ, resurrection, italian renaissance, renaissance period, della
  • Surrealism - 1,034 words
    Surrealism pure psychic automatism intended to express the true process of thought free from the exercise of reason and from any aesthetic or moral purpose mister sands / hmw oao jem coones art to the observer is an obsession art to the artist is an addiction few groups in the 20th century have been as influential as the surrealists. surrealism came at a time of dramatic upheaval, both historically and culturally, and grew to encompass all forms of art, wether it be drama, literature, painting, photography or cinema. indeed, their influence was so great that echoes of the breakthroughs made by such seers as breton, artaud, man ray, and dali can still be heard today. surrealism rose from the ...
    Related: surrealism, balance sheet, modern art, human existence, trigger
  • Tell Me Your Dreams - 1,692 words
    Tell Me Your Dreams The latest novel written by Sidney Sheldon, "Tell Me Your Dreams", is about three stunning young women. Their names are Ashley Patterson, Toni Prescott, and Alette Peters. They all live in Cupertino, California and work at Global Computer Graphics, a successful, fast-growing young company with two hundred employees in Silicon Valley. Ashley Patterson is a confused woman, but is smart and beautiful. Shes lonely, timid, and certainly convinced shes being stalked. Toni Prescott is an insolent, British flirt with a passion for Internet dating and cabarets. Alette Petters is a wannabe artist who chooses quiet, dreamy weekends with handsome painters. Ashley reminds herself of h ...
    Related: dreams, personality disorder, modern art, multiple personality disorder, multiple
  • The Art Of Influence - 1,038 words
    The Art Of Influence THE ART OF INFLUENCE; Africa And Its' Influence On Western Art Between The Mid-Nineteenth Century and The First World War During the mid 19th century up until the Great War of 1914, European countries began to heavily colonize and come into contact with African nations. This was called "new imperialism". During this contact, European culture was influenced by Africa. The influence of the African people can be seen in the European society of the time. In the 19th and 20th centuries, modern artists embraced African art for its lack of pretension or formal qualities. In the latter part of the 19th century, the "scramble for Africa," consolidated at the Berlin Conference, di ...
    Related: first world, rain forest, african people, visiting, arranged
  • The Arts Of Russia - 854 words
    The Arts Of Russia Russian Art, Music and Literature The Arts play a large role in the expression of inner thoughts and beauty in life. From dance and music to art the concept of life is shown through the various ways in which we interpret it. The arts play a valued role in creating cultures and developing and documenting civilizations. Russia has been developing the its culture for as long as anybody could think. Nowadays, Russian painters and musicians are quickly becoming well known among each and every one around the world. It should be no surprise that the rich Russian culture is producing so much talent, and everyone around the world seems to enjoy it. Great artists such as Peter Ilich ...
    Related: arts, modern art, russia, stained glass, opera house
  • The Exhibition Of Recent Stoneware Vessels By Peter Voulkos At Frank Lloyd Gallery Featured The Sort Of Work On Which The Art - 1,532 words
    The exhibition of recent stoneware vessels by Peter Voulkos at Frank Lloyd Gallery featured the sort of work on which the artist established reputation in the 1950s. The work was greeted with stunned amazement. However now it is too, but it's amazement of a different order -- the kind that comes from being in the presence of effortless artistic mastery. These astonishing vessels are truly amaising. Every ceramic artist knows that what goes into a kiln looks very different from what comes out, and although what comes out can be controlled to varying degrees, it's never certain. Uncertainty feels actively courted in Voulkos' vessels, and this embrace of chance gives them a surprisingly contrad ...
    Related: exhibition, frank, frank lloyd, gallery, lloyd, peter
  • The History Of The Smithsonian Institution And Its Founder, Has Truly Had An Impact On What The Elaborate, Extensive, And Com - 1,465 words
    ... reality. Ripley envisioned the Smithsonian as a 'society of scholars,' a 'university without classes.' In other words, he wanted to have vast buildings enclosed with shops, restaurants, and rest areas. He wanted events to entertain and educate the public. To reach these goals, he got another 50 scientists, developed an Office of Education and Training to make programs for students and young professionals. Ripley also extended the evening hours in the galleries and the museums. Luckily, Ripley's plans coincided with those of President Lyndon B. Johnson's plans of "Great Society" programs of the late 1960's. Johnson sought to improve the lives' of all Americans. So, on Ripley's first missi ...
    Related: african american history, american history, history, institution, natural history, smithsonian, smithsonian institution
  • This Be The Verse By Philip Larkin - 1,288 words
    This Be The Verse By Philip Larkin This Be the Verse by Philip Larkin They *censored* you up, your mum and dad. They may not mean to, but they do. They fill you with the faults they had And add some extra, just for you. But they were *censored*ed up in their turn By fools in old-style hats and coats, Who half the time were sloppy-stern And half at one another's throats. Man hands on misery to man. It deepens like a coastal shelf. Get out as early as you can, And don't have any kids yourself. Lately, I have read a good deal of poems by Philip Larkin, and one unifying factor that I have noticed is that Larkin never seems to use a filler. Every word in every one of his poems seems to be careful ...
    Related: larkin, verse, general public, modern art, accident
  • Timeline Of Art - 1,772 words
    Timeline of Art The Thread: The thread which joins all the isms in the twentieth century are its slow evolution from one period to another. As artists from one concepts were exploring a certain idea that led to another either just for the sake of the curiosity or by sheer boredom. Therefore my paper deals with the evolution of different isms in this century. Fauvism: From 1904-7, for a very brief period, a few Paris painters evolved a style of painting that earned the name Les Fauves (wild beasts). Henri Matisse, Andre Derain and Maurice Vlaminck were the major contributors to this style of painting which gained popularity due to its apparent freedom of expression with the use of pure colors ...
    Related: timeline, mark rothko, abstract expressionist, conceptual art, sculpture
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