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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: mobilization

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  • Social Mobilization - 1,267 words
    Social Mobilization Meet Sandra, a mother recently divorced from her abusive middle-class husband. Her previous life had been comfortable; she now lives day-to-day with her children, working as a secretary while attending college courses in her little spare time, all while attending to her home and family. She finally ends up attaining her degree, yet can still find no job paying higher than her secretarial job, so she takes on a second job as a grocery checkout person, still barely making ends meet for her family. As described in Ch. 9 of the Giddens text, this woman had obviously worked very hard to attempt to restore her life back to her previous pre-divorce middle-class state. She says, ...
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  • American Revolution - 3,384 words
    American Revolution In the aftermath of the French and Indian War, Britain needed a new imperial design, but the situation in America was anything but favorable to change. Long accustomed to a large measure of independence, the colonies were demanding more, not less, freedom, particularly now that the French menace had been eliminated. To put a new system into effect, and to tighten control, Parliament had to contend with colonists trained in self-government and impatient with interference. One of the first things that British attempted was the organization of the interior. The conquest of Canada and of the Ohio Valley necessitated policies that would not alienate the French and Indian inhab ...
    Related: american, american affairs, american colonies, american population, american revolution, american revolutionary, american revolutionary war
  • American Revolution - 555 words
    American Revolution Jim Jackson J. Parsley 4/18/98 THE DAUGHTERS OF LIBERTY The active participation of women in the Revolutionary War had an effect on the outcome. Mass political mobilization was a trademark of the protest leading to the independence of the colonies. Womens role in this mobilization was in the church, market, and family. Women also formed volunteer societies to provide for the soldiers material needs. Women also displayed acts of heroism on the battlefield. Despite these facts that are presented in our textbook of the important role women played in Revolutionary War effort, the image of the womans role in the American Revolution has been distorted by popular culture includi ...
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  • Barbarossa - 1,182 words
    ... nquest of France, or the speed of it (six weeks). The Balkan campaign which followed lasted only 18 days, and again with the armed forces of two states and a quality British Expeditionary Force routed, with light German casualties, (6,000). Germany had no reason to believe that the Russian campaign would last past its planned period (six to twelve weeks). When Germany attacked, they had assembled three million personnel, of which almost two million were battle formations. The Russians had two and half million soldiers all in battle formations, within 100 miles of the border. The Germans prepared 120 divisions, 17 armoured, and called upon five Finnish divisions, 14 Rumanian, and two Hung ...
    Related: barbarossa, operation barbarossa, eastern europe, nazi germany, consistently
  • Barrons Book Notes - 5,432 words
    ... ers in the front lines. His tactlessness makes Paul's first leave more miserable than it might otherwise have been. ^^^^^^^^^^ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT: FRAU (MRS.) BAUMER Paul's mother is a courageous woman who is dying of cancer. She is the most comforting person Paul finds at home. She alone does not pretend to understand what it is like at the front. Paul is in agony over her illness and is overwhelmed by the love she shows him by preparing his favorite foods and depriving herself in order to buy him fine underwear. ^^^^^^^^^^ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT: FRAU (MRS.) KEMMERICH Unlike Paul's quiet mother, Franz Kemmerich's mother tends to weep and wail. She had unreasonably exp ...
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  • Blitzkrieg - 1,453 words
    Blitzkrieg The First Phase: Dominance of the Axis Man for man, the German and Polish forces were an even match. Hitler committed about 1.5 million troops, and the Polish commander, Marshal Edward Smigy-Rydz, expected to muster 1.8 million. That was not the whole picture, however. The Germans had six panzer (armored) and four motorized divisions; the Poles had one armored and one motorized brigade and a few tank battalions. The Germans' 1600 aircraft were mostly of the latest types. Half of the Poles' 935 planes were obsolete. Result of German Blitzkrieg on Poland On September 1, 1939, Germany invaded Poland. The Polish army expected the attack to come along the Polish frontiers. But ...
    Related: blitzkrieg, polish army, denmark norway, north africa, history
  • Campus Unrest - 1,217 words
    ... was not what was best for the United States as it affected everyone in one way or another. Students were affected through their education, laborers in the steel mills were affected as the government prevented them from walking out on the job in order to maintain production, and the entire country was damaged as billions of dollars were removed from the national budget in order to fund the efforts overseas("What" 4-5). A turning point of the anti-war movement occurred in November of 1969. The New Mobilization to End the War, otherwise know as the "Mobe", proved to have a turnout of nearly a 500,000 people, the biggest crowd ever to gather in the United States in order to "ignite a politi ...
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  • Causes For Germanies Entry To Ww - 1,236 words
    Causes For Germanies Entry To Ww1 Germanies Entry into World War 1 November 25, 2000 World War One was caused solely by the aggression of one country and its allies. It was made possible by the political, military and economical environments inside the aggressor country. These all contributed to the initiation of the First World War by the then mayor European power, Germany. To the credit of the Prussians, Germany had the largest (except for Russia), best equipped and best-trained army of Europe. With their innovative use of the heavy machine gun (the Maxim gun) in protected pillboxes the German quickly had an edge in over the other European armies. To use this military might in an effective ...
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  • Causes Of World War I - 1,279 words
    ... ples of Russia had deep sympathy for their ethnic brothers in Serbia and so offered them support. Serbia, recognizing Russian defense, felt they had the power to question their Austrian rulers who ignored Serbian demands to liberate their people. Austria, ethnically dissimilar from the Serbians they governed, looked to a history of German association to counter the Serbian threat of Russian involvement. Germany, without need of an ally, saw the Austrian proposal as a means to create a stronger Germany, one that could compete with Europe's historical powers, France and Britain and the world's up and coming powers, The United States and Russia. If nothing else, ethnic differences between o ...
    Related: world book, world war i, treaty of versailles, austria hungary, vital
  • Civil Rights - 2,264 words
    ... tle Rock, Arkansas, in 1957, Governor Orval Faubus defied a federal court order to admit nine black students to Central High School, and President Dwight Eisenhower sent federal troops to enforce desegregation. The event was covered by the national media, and the fate of the Little Rock Nine, the students attempting to integrate the school, dramatized the seriousness of the school desegregation issue to many Americans. Although not all school desegregation was as dramatic as in Little Rock, the desegregation process did proceed-gradually. Frequently schools were desegregated only in theory, because racially segregated neighborhoods led to segregated schools. To overcome this problem, som ...
    Related: black civil rights, civil rights, civil rights act, civil rights legislation, civil rights movement, rights movement, voting rights
  • Clash Of Civilizations - 2,240 words
    ... ed to the Western impact in one or more of three ways: rejecting both modernization and Westernization, embracing both, or embracing modernization and rejecting Westernization. In the twentieth century improvements in transportation and communication and global interdependence increased tremendously the costs of exclusion. Except for small, isolated, rural, communities willing to exist at a subsistence level, the total rejection of modernization as well as Westernization is hardly possible in a world becoming overwhelmingly modern and highly interconnected. Kemalism, which is the embrace of both concepts, is based on the assumptions that modernization is desirable and necessary, that the ...
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  • Communist China - 1,258 words
    Communist China Communism in an Economically Developing China The future of communism in China is unknown, as the world economy becomes more international. Communism has been in China since 1949 and is still present in the countrys activities. Presently China is undergoing incredible economic growth and promises to be a dominant power early in the next century. Chinas social tradition has come under heavy pressure from forces of modernization generated in a large part by the sustained contact with the West that began in the middle of the nineteenth century. The Western incursion, not only refined China militarily but brought in its course new ideas- nationalism, science and technology, and i ...
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  • Cultural Diverse Children - 1,120 words
    ... TATE FOUNDATION, consists of three components designed to help young people ages 11-13 effectively resist gangs and violence, resolve conflicts and be positive peer helpers in their communities. It also allows them the opportunity to hold annual events that celebrate anti-gang, anti-violence themes. Street SMART serves as the National Project for Torch Clubs annually, and is available for all Boys & Girls Clubs to use. The Arts hese initiatives help young people enhance self-expression and creativity, develop multicultural appreciation, provide exposure to and develop skills in crafts and visual, performing and literary arts: National Fine Arts Exhibit Program Sponsored by L'Oreal, this ...
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  • Distinctive Aspects Of Soviet And Russian - 1,149 words
    ... War, showed the importance of simple, standardized and compatible weapon systems. The importance of this derives from the costs of learning to use new weapon systems and the increased probability of breakdown as a result of increased technological complexity. Thus, instead of complex and revolutionary weapon development Soviet weapon systems often developed in an evolutionary manner. For example, there is a long line of Soviet tanks from the T-34 to the T-72 which all have great similarities and interchangeable parts. Similarly, airplanes (MiGs) and guns (such as the AKs) are designed using past systems as close models. The crucial mechanism in this process of matching weapons to practi ...
    Related: distinctive, russian, soviet, soviet army, soviet empire, soviet military
  • Endurance - 735 words
    Endurance Endurance plays a major role in many athletic activities. Without endurance training, many athletes would not be able to compete in their respective sports. Endurance training involves low resistance and high repetitions, but what exactly does this do to your body and how does it do it? For starters, endurance training increases the level of certain aerobic enzymes, which are needed for the breakdown of fuels to produce energy. Enzymes are proteins that speed up metabolic reactions; they release and transfer energy. Enzymes are influenced by many factors: 1) Temperature- activity is increased when the muscles are warm, therefore warming up before the actual activity is very importa ...
    Related: endurance, physical activity, blood pressure, long distance, tune
  • First World War - 1,234 words
    First World War The First World War began as a spark and exploded into a merciless blood bath of money, power, and land. The little spark began in the mountainous Balkans of southeastern Europe where small state-sized nations argued back and forth. For hundreds of years many of these small nations were held under the gripping powers of Turkey, Russia, and Austria-Hungary. It started in the capital of Bosnia, Sarajevo. Bosnia was also a mini-nation of the Austria-Hungary Empire. On the day of June twenty-eight, 1914, the leader of Austria-Hungary and his wife were visiting the city. Shots rang out from a young Slavic nationalist heading for the two. They were both killed. This person lived in ...
    Related: first world, world war i, german colonies, austria hungary, payback
  • Foundation Of Nation - 259 words
    Foundation Of Nation Formation of Nation A formation of nation occurs when a state has a unified administrative reach over the territory over which its sovereignty is claimed. The development of a plurality of nations is basic to the centralization and administrative expansion of state domination internally. Therefore the nation-state, which exists in a complex of other nation-states, is a set of institutional forms of governance maintaining an administrative monopoly over an economic, political, social and cultural territory with demarcated borders, its rule being sanctioned by law and direct control of the means of internal and external violence exists when a state has a unified administra ...
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  • Fritz Haber Chemist And Patriot - 1,458 words
    Fritz Haber - Chemist and Patriot The name Fritz Haber has long been associated with the well-known process of synthesizing ammonia from its elements. While primarily known for developing a process which ultimately relieved the world of dependence on Chilean ammonia, this twentieth century Nobel prize winner was also involved in the varying fortunes of Germany in World War I and in the rise to power of the Nazi regime. Haber was born on December 9, 1868 in Prussia. He was the son of a prosperous German chemical merchant and worked for his father after being educated in Berlin, Heidelberg, and Zurich. After a short time, Haber left his father's business and took up research in organic chemist ...
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  • Great War - 1,194 words
    Great War The Great War BY Kevin Kilkenny World War I was from 1914 to 1918 it started out as a local European war between Austria-Hungary and Serbia on July 28, 1914, but then became European war when the declaration of war against Russia on August 1, 1914 and eventually became a global war involving 32 nations. 28 of these nations were Allies and the Associated Powers and including Great Britain, France, Russia, Italy, and the United States. The Central Powers consisting of Germany, Austria-Hungary, Turkey, and Bulgaria. It would prove to have many great effects. The immediate cause of the war between Austria-Hungary and Serbia was the assassination on June 28, 1914, at Sarajevo in Bosnia ...
    Related: great britain, great world, self defense, greater serbia, eastern
  • Hirshima Bombing - 1,755 words
    Hirshima Bombing! HIROSHIMA AND NAGASAKI BOMBING Fifty four years ago, the detonation of the first atomic bomb on the Japanese city of Hiroshima (and later on Nagasaki) ushered to the Nuclear Age. It was a moment full of horror, in which the eyes of the whole world were opened to the unimaginable possibility of nuclear holocaust. The experience on what happened to those cities and what is still happening to many of the survivors there, leads to explore what happened to America as a consequence of Hiroshima; both the bomb's existence in the world, and the United States having used it. The dropping of the bomb was born out a complex abundance of military, domestic and diplomatic pressures and ...
    Related: bombing, human health, president truman, different countries, sticky
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