Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: metaphysical

  • 127 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>
  • The Metaphysical Occurrences In Macbeth - 621 words
    The Metaphysical Occurrences In Macbeth The Metaphysical Occurrencences In Macbeth The Three witches in the tragedy Macbeth are introduced right at the beginning of the play. They tell Macbeth three prophesies, he will be Thane of Cawdor, Thane of Glams and King. These prophesies introduce him to ideas of greatness. Macbeth will eventually follow through on killing king Duncan. This brings into the play, idea of fate and the role with which it has in the play. The witches could foretell the future, they can add temptation, and influence Macbeth, but they can not control his destiny. Macbeth creates his own anguish when he is driven by his own sense of guilt. This causes him to become insecur ...
    Related: lady macbeth, macbeth, metaphysical, king duncan, disastrous
  • The Seventeenth Century Lyric Poems, Such As Robert Herricks Cavalier Poem Counsel To Girls, And Andrew Marvells Metaphysical - 430 words
    The seventeenth century lyric poems, such as Robert Herricks Cavalier poem "Counsel to Girls," and Andrew Marvells metaphysical poem "To His Coy Mistress" are similar in many ways; yet also contrast in some aspects. These poems of love and life can be summarized in the quote, "Gather ye rosebuds while ye may, Old Time is still afyling..." from "Counsel to Girls." This quote embodies the theme of Carpe Diem shared in these poems. Robert Herricks "Counsel to Girls" is a Cavalier poem written in the seventeenth century. In the poem, the speaker is an elderly person with life experience. The speaker is talking to a younger woman about life and love. The speaker tells the younger person to enjoy ...
    Related: andrew, cavalier, counsel, metaphysical, poem, seventeenth, seventeenth century
  • 17th Century Poetry - 543 words
    17Th Century Poetry The seventeenth century was a time of difficult changes and uncertainties. During these chaotic years many poets and philosophers expressed their thoughts and emotions through literature. This paper will briefly describe the seventeenth century and will include quotes and philosophies of poets such as John Donne, John Milton and Richard Lovelace. Life in the seventeenth century can be described as violent. After Queen Elizabeths death, James I, her successor created disorder when he wanted everyone to be Anglican. This soon led to the beheading of his successor, King Charles I. Throughout this century England saw many different rulers and seven civil wars. During the last ...
    Related: century england, century poetry, poetry, seventeenth century, civil wars
  • 1984 Abstract - 616 words
    1984 Abstract Book Review of 1984 (5/97) One year before his death in 1950, George Orwell published a book entitled 1984. Since then, the novel has become a bible to people all over the world. The enthusiasm is not only due to the fact that the novel is written so eloquently, and with such foresight, but also because it makes a bold statement about humanity. 1984s main character is Winston Smith, a man who doubts the righteousness of the totalitarian government (Big Brother) that rules Oceania, one of three superstates in the world of 1984. We begin the book with Winston, and learn that Big Brother is quite fictional. The government has developed its own language, is at constant war with the ...
    Related: 1984, abstract, book review, george orwell, stark
  • A Universal Perspective On Belief: - 1,897 words
    A Universal Perspective On Belief: A Universal Perspective on Belief: A Response to Pragmatic and Cartesian Approaches to Epistemology By Britta Rempel (*note to reader:I hope this gives all of you struggling with some concepts in Intro to Philosophy a clearer view on how to approach your own paper, please do not plagerise) The approaches given by Pierce and Nagel to the epistemological questions of doubt and belief, though diverse in that they are strictly pragmatist and Cartesian, contain a similar underlying principle. They both serve to show that belief cannot come from any source that appeals to one's feelings or purposes, experiences or impressions. Beliefs must arise from a non-person ...
    Related: fetal alcohol syndrome, alcohol syndrome, illegal drug, empiricism, stability
  • Alchemy - 1,850 words
    ... e of Hermetic theory and the consciousness in the alchemical mind that what might with success be applied to nature could also be applied to man with similar results. Says Mr. Waite, "The gold of the philosopher is not a metal, on the other hand, man is a being who possesses within himself the seeds of a perfection which he has never realized, and that he therefore corresponds to those metals which the Hermetic theory supposes to be capable of developing the latent possibilities in the subject man." At the same time, it must be admitted that the cryptic character of alchemical language was probably occasioned by a fear on the part of the alchemical mystic that he might lay himself open t ...
    Related: alchemy, first half, chemical analysis, modern science, appeal
  • Alchemy - 664 words
    Alchemy Alchemy There are many ways to examine the subject of alchemy, including alchemy as a source of symbolism, psychology, and mysticism. It has also been an influence on the world view of various writers, artist, and musicians. The focus of this report is alchemy as a pre-chemistry, which gave a new impulse towards the preparation of medicinal remedies and also was a major influence on today's scientific investigations. Alchemy is an ancient art, practiced in the Middle Ages. The fundamental concept of alchemy stemmed from Aristotle's doctrine that all things tend to reach perfection. Because other metals were thought to be less perfect than gold, it was reasonable to believe that natur ...
    Related: alchemy, modern chemistry, ancient art, modern science, predecessor
  • An Overview Of Immanuel Kant - 1,043 words
    ... tegorical imperative focuses on the principle, rather than the people, involved. Kants theory also avoids utilitarianism, which would permit lying, murder, stealing, and the like, if it produces happiness. His theory is for capital punishment(2). Kant writes: Even if a civil society resolved to dissolve itself with the consent of all its members- as might be supposed in the case of a people inhabiting an island resolving to separate and scatter through the whole world- the last murder lying in prison ought to be executed before the resolution was carried out. This ought to be done in order that every one may realize the desert of his deeds, and that bloodguiltiness may not remain on the ...
    Related: immanuel, immanuel kant, kant, overview, categorical imperative
  • Are Science And Religion One - 2,036 words
    Are Science And Religion One? Are Science and Religion One? Introduction I have identified the axiom of mysticism (TAM) as the scientific, religious and philosophical fact that there is only one thing that exists. Because the meaning of mysticism is commonly misunderstood this definition needs some clarification. The dictionary defines mysticism as a personal relationship with God. Given this definition it is easy to see why I have named the theory that, everything existent and non-existent is God, as the axiom of mysticism. If the theory is correct then a personal relationship with God is mandatory because God is all that can be experienced. After being confronted with TAM for the first tim ...
    Related: physical science, religion, science, general relativity, modern physics
  • Aristotle Vs Plato On Metaphysics - 1,414 words
    Aristotle Vs. Plato On Metaphysics The Opposing Views of Great Minds The word metaphysics is defined as "The study or theory of reality; sometimes used more narrowly to refer to transcendent reality, that is, reality which lies beyond the physical world and cannot therefore be grasped by means of the senses." It simply asks what is the nature of being? Metaphysics helps us to reach beyond nature as we see it, and to discover the `true nature' of things, their ultimate reason for existing. There are many ways to approach metaphysics. Two of the earliest known thinkers on the topic are Plato and Aristotle. These two philosophers had ideas that held very contrasting differences that can be narr ...
    Related: aristotle, aristotle plato, knowledge plato, metaphysics, plato
  • Buddhism And Confucianism - 1,123 words
    Buddhism And Confucianism Throughout history, great civilizations and people have risen and fallen, and during their fleeting existence, religious activities have assumed important functions in those societies. Confucianism, Buddhism, and Islam, are three legacies left by great men, which still have a profound affect on society. Like with all human inventions, though, these three philosophies are all relative to each other : They are comparable in their simplicity of beliefs, the emphasis they placed on the role of women within their society, and the transformation into different sects in later years; but differ from each other in their emphasis in each field respectively. The basic doctrine ...
    Related: buddhism, confucianism, golden age, great world, publicly
  • Can Sociology Be Value Free - 1,286 words
    Can Sociology Be Value Free? Value neutrality is a term used by Weber to indicate the necessary objectivity researchers need when investigating problems in the social sciences. Weber also cautioned against the making of value judgements which coincide with the orientation or motives of the researcher. It is important to note that although Weber believed that value neutrality was the aim of research, his view was that no science is fundamentally neutral and its observational language is never independent of the way individuals see phenomena and the questions they ask about them (Morrison 1995 pp.267, 347) It is this link between the researcher's theoretical stand and the methods adopted that ...
    Related: sociology, twentieth century, research process, scientific method, dissimilar
  • Charles Manson: Methods To The Madness - 1,869 words
    Charles Manson: Methods To The Madness On the morning of August 9, 1969, three LAPD officers arrived at 10050 Cielo Drive (Bugliosi 7). The scene that awaited them was horrendous. In the driveway, in a parked car, the body of Steven Parent was found. He was shot four times and stabbed once. Laying about eighteen or twenty feet past the front door of the house, Voytek Frykowski had been shot twice, beaten over the head with a blunt object thirteen times, and stabbed fifty-one times. Also discovered on the lawn was coffee heiress Abigail Folger, stabbed twenty-eight times. Inside the home, in the living room, were the bodies of Jay Sebring and Sharon Tate. Sebring, a hair stylist, had been sta ...
    Related: charles manson, madness, saint joseph, highest level, eager
  • Chinese Art During The Early Empire - 1,787 words
    Chinese Art During The Early Empire In this essay, I will look at the outpouring of thought, art and literature during the early empire. More so though, I will focus on what factors led to this renewed focus on culture in the early empire. It would seem that there were several factor which would lead to this renewed interest in culture in early China, but the most significant of these factors would be the re-establishment of a strong central government. This re-establishment of a strong central government laid the foundation for cultural growth. It brought with it prosperity to China, through improved infrastructure, such as the canals and graineries. As a result of these improvements, China ...
    Related: chinese, chinese art, chinese culture, chinese history, chinese people, chinese society, chinese tradition
  • Chinese Medicine - 1,489 words
    Chinese Medicine Acupuncture, Qigong, and Chinese Medicine Stephen Barrett, M.D. Chinese medicine, often called Oriental medicine or traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), encompasses a vast array of folk medical practices based on mysticism. It holds that the body's vital energy (chi or qi) circulates through 14 channels, called meridians, that have branches connected to bodily organs and functions. Illness is attributed to imbalance or interruption of chi.. Ancient practices such as acupuncture and Qigong are claimed to restore balance. Traditional acupuncture, as now practiced, involves the insertion of stainless steel needles into various body areas. A low-frequency current may be applied t ...
    Related: chinese, chinese medicine, herbal medicine, medicine, oriental medicine, traditional chinese, traditional chinese medicine
  • Comparison Of Descartes And Heidegger - 845 words
    Comparison Of Descartes And Heidegger According to Descartes, the essence of material substance is simply extension, the property of filling up space. (Med. V) So solid geometry, which describes the possibility of dividing an otherwise uniform space into distinct parts, is a complete guide to the essence of body. It follows that there can be in reality only one extended substance, comprising all matter in a single spatial whole. From this, Descartes concluded that individual bodies are merely modes of the one extended being, that there can be no space void of extension, and that all motion must proceed by circular vortex. Thus, again, the true nature of bodies is understood by pure thought, ...
    Related: comparison, descartes, heidegger, sixth meditation, human nature
  • Computers Mimic The Human Mind - 1,461 words
    Computers Mimic The Human Mind Computers Mimic The Human Mind The mind-body problem has captivated the minds of philosophers for centuries. The problem is how the body and mind can interact with each other if they are separate and distinct. One solution to the problem is to replace any mental term with a more accurate physical description. Eliminative Materialists take this idea to the extreme by stating that everything that is believed to be mental will someday be explained in terms of the physical world. One way that people try to prove Eliminative Materialism to be true is through technology. Certainly if we are able to create computers and software that mimic the human mind, then Elimina ...
    Related: computer program, computers, human beings, human brain, human mind
  • Confucianism, The Philosophical System Founded On The Teaching Of Confucius, Who Lived From 551 Bc To 479 Bc, Dominated Chine - 647 words
    Confucianism, the philosophical system founded on the teaching of Confucius, who lived from 551 BC to 479 BC, dominated Chinese sociopolitical life for most of the Chinese history and largely influenced the cultures of Korea, Japan, and Indochina. The Confucian school functioned as a recruiting ground for government positions, which were filled by those scoring highest on examinations in the Confucian classics. It also blended with popular and important religions and became the vehicle for presenting Chinese values to the peasants. The school's doctrine supported political authority using the theory of the mandate of heaven. It sought to help rulers maintain domestic order, preserve traditio ...
    Related: founded, philosophical, acquiring knowledge, standard of living, mandate
  • Confucius - 1,197 words
    ... i, that the people would correct their behavior by their own initiative. In the Analects, Confucius said, Lead the people with legal measures and regulate them by punishment, and they will avoid wrongdoing but will have no sense of honor and shame. Lead them with the power of virtuous example and regulate them by the rules of li, and they will have a sense of shame and will thus rectify themselves. (Analects 2.3) Confucius sought to create an environment in which people would naturally be harmonious and thus virtuous. He believed that harmony was an unavoidable result of li, because li was a perfect reflection of cosmic order. From a Confucian perspective, any land that acted according t ...
    Related: confucius, chinese society, social life, chinese civilization, buddhism
  • Creationism - 1,390 words
    Creationism Creationism is a religious metaphysical theory about the origin of the universe. It is not a scientific theory. Technically, creationism is not necessarily connected to any particular religion. It simply requires a belief in a Creator. Millions of Christians and non-Christians believe there is a Creator of the universe and that scientific theories such as the the theory of evolution do not conflict with belief in a Creator. However, fundamentalist Christians such as Ronald Reagan and Jerry Falwell, have co-opted the term 'creationism' and it is now difficult to refer to creationism without being understood as referring to fundamentalist Christians who (a) take the stories in Gene ...
    Related: creationism, natural selection, scientific facts, stephen jay gould, certainty
  • 127 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>