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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: mental illness

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  • Mental Illness - 443 words
    Mental Illness Mental Illness Mental illness is a disorder that is characterized by disturbances in a persons thought, emotions, or behavior. Mental illness refers to a wide variety of disorders, ranging from those that cause mild distress to those that impair a persons ability to function in daily life. Many have tried to figure out the reasons for mental illnesses. All of these reasons have been looked at and thought of for thousands of years. The biological perspective views mental illness as a bodily process. Where as the psychological perspectives think the role of a persons upbringing and environment are causes for mental illnesses. Researchers estimate that about 24 percent of people ...
    Related: illness, mental illness, mental illnesses, major depression, personal hygiene
  • Mental Illness - 512 words
    Mental Illness Eng. 201 Essay #1 Persuasive Essay Wisconsin has a problem on its hands and it is not being dealt with in the right manner. The problem keeps getting bigger and bigger everyday. Instead of giving treatment to the mentally ill, hospital facilities have pushed thousands of mentally ill people on to the street. The idea behind this is to give those with mental illness, a freedom that has been taken from them since they were institutionalized. This plan has a lot of great qualities that would help a lot of people. But there are some serious repercussions because of it. The problem is simple; the law that released thousands of mentally ill people is too vague. The law should have p ...
    Related: illness, mental illness, mental illnesses, police force, posttraumatic stress
  • Study On Children With Abdominal Pain And Its Relationship To Mental Illness - 730 words
    Study On Children With Abdominal Pain And Its Relationship To Mental Illness Bibliography: Hotopf, Matthew, Why Do Children Have Chronic Abdominal Pain, and What Happens to Them When They Grow Up? British Medical Journal, April 1998 Topic: Why Do Children Have Chronic Abdominal Pain, and What Happens to Them When They Grow Up? Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that children who have persistent abdominal pain come from families with high rates of psychiatric disorder, neuroticism and physical illness. The study also analyzed whether these children will suffer from the previously mentioned illnesses in adulthood. Subjects: The study the based on a sample stratif ...
    Related: abdominal, illness, mental illness, psychiatric disorders, medical journal
  • A Summary Of The Color Purple - 441 words
    A Summary Of The Color Purple The novel begins with the rape of a young black girl named Celie by her father, Fonso. Her mother gies of mental illness and Celie gives birth to 2 children. Fonso leads Celie to believe he had them killed. Then, one day in town she sees her daughter with another woman. It is at this time that her sister, Nettie gains a boyfriend named Mr. . He seeks Nettie's hand in marriage but is refused by Fonso. Instead, Fonso offers Celie. Mr. acceots and she lives with him and his children miserably. He beats her. It is during this time that Celie learns of Shug Avery, a former flame of Mr. . Celie finds strength through her picture of Shug Avery to endure her struggles. ...
    Related: color purple, purple, summary, the color purple, shug avery
  • Although At First Sight The Dsmiv Classification System Appears To Provide Clinicians With A Useful Framework Of Which To Vie - 1,974 words
    Although at first sight the DSM-IV classification system appears to provide clinicians with a useful framework of which to view their clients, on closer inspection however, the picture is somewhat less satisfactory. Criticisms of the system range from Wakefield's (1997) analysis that psychological presentation ranges from problems of living to harmful dysfunction; through to Livesley, Schroeder & Jang's (1994) counter-argument that evidence of discontinuity between different diagnoses and normality would support the DSM's proposal of distinct diagnostic categories. Since these issues involved are quite distinct, both these points of view are presented in relation to a cause and consequence d ...
    Related: classification, framework, university press, mental disorder, application
  • Alzheimers - 1,205 words
    Alzheimers Disease Alzheimers Disease is a progressive, degenerative disease that attacks the brain and results in impaired memory, thinking and behavior (Internet). It is a degenerative disease affecting nerve cells of the frontal and temporal lobes of the cerebrum of the brain. The disease is the major cause of presenile dementia (i.e., the loss of mental faculties not associated with advanced age) and is thought to be the largest single cause of senile dementia as well (Britannica, 306). It causes the connections between cells to become ineffective and the cells themselves to shutdown and eventually die (Davies, 1). Alzheimers is a progressive, irreversible, fatal neurologic disorder that ...
    Related: alois alzheimer, alzheimers disease, warning signs, mental illness, paranoia
  • Alzheimers Disease - 1,694 words
    Alzheimer's Disease Alzheimer's Disease With all of the advanced technology that the medical field possesses today, there is still suffering that occurs from incurable diseases. Alzheimer's Disease is one of those incurable diseases that take the lives of many today. This paper will examine this disease thoroughly by looking at its definition, and discussing general information, facts, and figures. The cause of Alzheimer's Disease, and the much thought about question of if it is genetic or not will disputed. Also the symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of Alzheimer's Disease will be addressed. Included will also be tips on how to make the life of an Alzheimer's patient easier. What is Alzheim ...
    Related: alois alzheimer, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, heart disease, nursing home
  • Alzheimers Disease - 1,004 words
    Alzheimer's Disease Dementia is the loss of intellectual and social abilities severe enough to interfere with daily functioning. For centuries, people called it senility and considered it an inevitable part of aging. It is now known that dementia is not a normal part of the aging process and that it is caused by an underlying condition. People with this condition need special assistance to carry on with their normal lives. This paper will explain some of the social services that are helping to combat this disease and an analysis of the services effectiveness. More than four million older Americans have Alzheimer's, the most common form of dementia. And that number is expected to triple in th ...
    Related: alois alzheimer, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, cardiovascular disease, disease process
  • American Dominance In Works By Ken Kesey - 1,023 words
    American Dominance in Works by Ken Kesey The idea of having the power of taming an unknown, rugged territory has always been a significant goal in American society. The early American settlers came over to this continent to find a better home with the intention to conquer and make their surroundings fit their needs. In an interview with Ken Kesey, he said: What I explore in all my work: wilderness. Settlers on this continent from the beginning have been seeking wilderness and its wilderness. The explorers and pioneers sought that wilderness because they could sense that in Europe everything had become locked in tight. . . .When we got here there was a sense of possibilities and new direction ...
    Related: american, american society, dominance, early american, ken kesey, kesey
  • Animal Experimentation - 777 words
    Animal Experimentation Animal Experimentation ANIMAL RIGHTS-- The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals was founded in England in 1824 to promote humane treatment of work animals, such as cattle and horses, and of household pets. Within a few decades similar organizations existed throughout Europe. An American society was founded in New York in 1866. Then after, these organizations were protesting the use of animals in laboratory experiments and the use of vivisection for teaching. Until the mid-1970s the focus on humane treatment of animals continued. After that period, animal rights activists enlarged their priorities, considerably. It is estimated that 70 million animals are us ...
    Related: animal behavior, animal experimentation, animal research, animal rights, animal testing, experimentation
  • Anne Sexton - 1,246 words
    Anne Sexton Anne Sexton The third decade of the twentieth century brought on more explicit writers than ever before, but none were as expressive as Anne Sexton. Her style of writing, her works, the image that she created, and the crazy life that she led are all prime examples of this. Known as one of the most "confessional" poets of her time, Anne Sexton was also one of the most criticized. She was known to use images of incest, adultery, and madness to reveal the depths of her deeply troubled life, which often brought on much controversy. Despite this, Anne went on to win many awards and go down as one of the best poets of all time. Anne Sexton was born Anne Gray Harvey on November 9, 1928 ...
    Related: anne, anne sexton, sexton, personal experience, attempted suicide
  • Atomic - 2,186 words
    ... re were no smells. There was no movement. Every step I took made a gravelly squeak in blue-white frost. And every squeak was echoed loudly. The season of locking was over. The Earth was locked up tight (179).This description eerily resembles what many have said the Earth will look like during a nuclear winter (Stone, 62). In addition to Dr. Hoenikker and his doomsday games, Vonnegut provides an interesting analysis of atomic age society with the Bokonon religion. This religion, completely made up by Vonnegut and used in this novel, is the religion of every single inhabitant of San Lorenzo, the books imaginary banana republic. This is the island where Jonah eventually ends up, and where t ...
    Related: atomic, atomic bomb, collected poems, nuclear waste, ripper
  • Attacks On The Insanity Defense The Insanity Defense Refers To That Branch Of The Concept Of Insanity Which Defines The Exten - 1,858 words
    ATTACKS ON THE INSANITY DEFENSE The insanity defense refers to that branch of the concept of insanity which defines the extent to which men accused of crimes may be relieved of criminal responsibility by virtue of mental disease. The terms of such a defense are to be found in the instructions presented by the trial judge to the jury at the close of a case. These instructions can be drawn from any of several rules used in the determination of mental illness. The final determination of mental illness rests solely on the jury who uses information drawn from the testimony of "expert" witnesses, usually professionals in the field of psychology. The net result of such a determination places an ind ...
    Related: branch, insanity, insanity defense, major problem, legal definition
  • Attacks On The Insanity Defense The Insanity Defense Refers To That Branch Of The Concept Of Insanity Which Defines The Exten - 1,803 words
    ... actual way of mapping the brain and conclusively determining exactly what portion thereof is responsible for either type of behavior much less that one area is responsible for both. In essence even if true this theory is unprovable. There is also a statistical relationship between crime and mental illness. Guttmacker and Weihofen found 1.5 percent of the criminal population psychotic, 2.4 percent mentally defective, 6.9 percent neurotic, and 11.2 percent psychopathic (Jeffery, 1985:66). These figures are very unconvincing. Additionally they are based on old diagnostic categories and procedures which are most unreliable. Also, the meaning of neurotic or psychotic or psychopathic is uncer ...
    Related: branch, insanity, insanity defense, self defense, criminal law
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder - 1,225 words
    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Understanding the Behavioral Disorder: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Imagine living in a fast-moving kaleidoscope, where sounds, images, and thoughts are constantly shifting. Feeling easily bored, yet helpless to keep your mind on tasks you need to complete. Distracted by unimportant sights and sounds, your mind drives you from one thought or activity to the next. Perhaps you are so wrapped up in a collage of thoughts and images that you don't notice when someone speaks to you. "Tommy can't sit still. He is disruptive at school with his constant talking and clowning around. He leaves the classroom without the teacher's permission. Al ...
    Related: attention deficit, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, deficit, deficit hyperactivity, disorder, hyperactivity, hyperactivity disorder
  • Autism - 1,300 words
    Autism Autism Autism is a complex developmental disability that typically appears during the first three years of life. The result of a neurological disorder that affects the functioning of the brain, autism and its associated behaviors have been estimated to occur in as many as 1 in 500 individuals (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 1997). Autism is four times more prevalent in boys than girls (Autism: Basic Information) and knows no racial, ethnic, or social boundaries. Although autism manifests itself at an early age, it doesnt worsen as a child ages (webofcare.com). Autism impacts the normal development of the brain in the areas of social interaction and communication skills. Ch ...
    Related: autism, college degree, basic information, genetic basis, inadequate
  • Battered Womens Syndrome: A Survey Of Contemporary Theories In 1991, Governor William Weld Modified Parole Regulations And Pe - 1,755 words
    ... s theory, explaining help organizations are too overwhelmed and limited in their resources to be effective and therefore do not try as hard as they should to help victims. Whatever the case may be, the researchers argue that we can better understand the plight of the battered woman by asking did she seek help and what happened when she did, rather than why didn't she leave. Because the survivor theory of learned helplessness attributes the battered woman's plight to ineffective help sources and societal indifference, a logical solution would entail increased funding for programs in place and educating the public about the symptoms and consequences of domestic violence. There are battered ...
    Related: battered women, contemporary, governor, modified, parole, survey, weld
  • Cambodia - 1,983 words
    Cambodia The Impact of the Past on the Present Cambodia, then, like so many other nations in the developing world, is an agricultural country, and, in terms of the cash incomes of its people, desperately poor. In the past, Cambodia was able to earn foreign exchange to pay for imported goods by selling agricultural surpluses-of rice and corn, for example-or plant crops, such as pepper, rubber, and cotton. Its normal patterns of trade were broken up in the wars of the 1970's. When the fighting died down, Cambodian trade became lively again, but more informal, which benefited many individual traders but deprived the government of money it needed to pay for essential services, like electricity, ...
    Related: cambodia, prime minister, khmer rouge, peace process, reject
  • Capital Punishment And Minors - 1,238 words
    Capital Punishment And Minors The death penalty is utilized as an optimistic view to alleviate much of what is morally, and criminally wrong with our society. Yet in reality, capital punishment does nothing to improve Americas justice system by allegedly acting as a deterrent to the criminals. Nevertheless, Americans continue to execute adults and children on dubious principles. The execution of children is particularly outrageous. International and Federal standards sanction that children are exempt from the death penalty; not in order to grant absolution for their crimes, or to disparage the suffering of the victims family, but in recognition of their immaturity and potential for rehabilit ...
    Related: capital punishment, punishment, federal laws, death row, elder
  • Counseling Process - 1,140 words
    Counseling Process I. Title Overview of Counseling and Psychotherapy II. Definition Psychotherapy is the treatment of individuals with emotional problems, behavioral problems, or mental illness primarily through verbal communication. At one time the term psychotherapy referred to a form of psychiatric treatment used with severely disturbed individuals. Counseling, on the other hand, refers to the treatment of people with milder psychological problems or to advice given on vocational and educational matters. Counseling psychologists usually work in schools or industrial firms, advising and assisting people. Today the distinction between psychotherapy and counseling is quite blurred, and many ...
    Related: counseling, health professionals, sexually abused, health maintenance, outcome
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