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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: mental disorder

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  • Abnormal Psychology - 1,197 words
    Abnormal Psychology In a world full of fears, perhaps the worst one a human being should haveis that to be afraid of his fellow man. The human that should be mostfeared is the one that has Anti-Social Personality Disorder or in laymensterms the psychopath. The psychopath is probably the most deviant mindthat exists and treatment is not very successful because there is not a cureor drug to control it. The solution in my mind to control the problem ofsociopaths is to let them live in colonies with each other. Through myresearch I will develop an understanding of this personality disorder andconvince you the reader that my solution might be a viable solution. Thesociopath is a combination of ot ...
    Related: abnormal, abnormal psychology, psychology, hyperactivity disorder, violent behavior
  • Aggressive Behavior - 1,312 words
    Aggressive Behavior Aggression is a behavioral characteristic that refers to forceful actions or procedures (such a deliberate attack) with intentions to dominate or master. It tends to be hostile, injurious, or destructive, and is often motivated by frustration (The Merriam-Webster Dictionary, 1995). For an individual, aggressive behavior is considered understandable and normal under appropriate circumstances, but when it is frequent, intense, lasting, and pervasive, it is more likely to be a symptom of a mental disorder. Likewise, aggression between groups, can be in the form of healthy competition, but can become harmful when unfair or unjust disadvantage or frustration is perceived, lead ...
    Related: abnormal behavior, aggressive, aggressive behavior, behavioral therapy, social norms
  • Although At First Sight The Dsmiv Classification System Appears To Provide Clinicians With A Useful Framework Of Which To Vie - 1,974 words
    Although at first sight the DSM-IV classification system appears to provide clinicians with a useful framework of which to view their clients, on closer inspection however, the picture is somewhat less satisfactory. Criticisms of the system range from Wakefield's (1997) analysis that psychological presentation ranges from problems of living to harmful dysfunction; through to Livesley, Schroeder & Jang's (1994) counter-argument that evidence of discontinuity between different diagnoses and normality would support the DSM's proposal of distinct diagnostic categories. Since these issues involved are quite distinct, both these points of view are presented in relation to a cause and consequence d ...
    Related: classification, framework, university press, mental disorder, application
  • Amphetaminesmethamphetamines - 772 words
    Amphetamines/Methamphetamines Matchmaker.com: Sign up now for a free trial. Date Smarter! Amphetamines/Methamphetamines The medical use of amphetamines was common in the 1950/60's when they were used to help cure depression and to help the user lose weight. An amphetamine is a drug that is a stimulant to the central nervous system. Amphetamines are colorless and may be inhaled, injected, or swallowed. Amphetamines are also used non-medically to avoid sleep, improve athletic performance, or to counter the effects of depressant drugs. Amphetamines are addictive. Because of this, when the user discontinues use or reduces the amount that they use, withdrawal symptoms may occur. Some withdrawal s ...
    Related: long term effects, south korea, physical activity, addictive, smoke
  • Anorexia - 670 words
    Anorexia In today's society, we often hear of people who suffer daily from illnesses such as cancer, AIDS, obsessive-compulsive disorder, phobias, tuberculosis, downs syndrome and many other types of illness both communicable and non-communicable. What about the illness that consumes the life of over eight million Americans, 90% being women? "Anorexia nervosa, in medicine a condition characterized by intense fear of gaining weight or becoming obese, as well as a distorted body image, leading to an excessive weight loss from restricting food intake and excessive exercise. Anorexia nervosa is not associated with any preexisting physical illness. It is found chiefly in adolescents, especially y ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, obsessive compulsive disorder, sports medicine, distorted
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 1,038 words
    ... ted by mental problems. That is why it is more commonly found in teens. If a person is experiencing a lot of problems or stress it could cause them to stop eating and stay away from people. Many people are forced to this by the attitudes of other people. As I previously said, anorexia can develop by comparing yourself to super models. The bodies people see are nearly unobtainable, yet people will strive to look like them. This is when young girls will usually develop the disease. It sometimes will happen as a group. A bunch of girls will develop anorexia after watching a movie or reading a magazine with a thin girl that makes millions of dollars. Males will usually develop the disease wh ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, nervosa, eating disorder
  • Antisocial Disorder - 244 words
    Antisocial Disorder Since the beginnings of psychiatry in the early 19th century, it has been recognized that there are persons whose persisting antisocial behavior can not be understood in terms of mental disorder or neurotic motivations. The father of French psychiatry, Phillipe Pinel, noted that some people seem to behave crazily without actually being crazy. The German systematisist, like Robert Koch, first coined the term "psychopathic" to describe such phenomenon now known as personality disorders. Webster defines antisocial as "hostile or harmful to organized society being marked by behavior sharply deviating from the social norm." The diagnostic criteria for antisocial personality ar ...
    Related: antisocial, antisocial behavior, disorder, mental disorder, robert koch
  • Antisocial Personality Disorder - 1,233 words
    Anti-Social Personality Disorder In a world full of fears, perhaps the worst one a human being should have is that to be afraid of his fellow man. The human that should be most feared is the one that has Anti-Social Personality Disorder or in laymen's terms the psychopath. The psychopath is probably the most deviant mind that exists and treatment is not very successful because there is not a cure or drug to control it. The solution in my mind to control the problem of sociopaths is to let them live in colonies with each other. Through my research I will develop an understanding of this personality disorder and convince you the reader that my solution might be a viable solution. The sociopath ...
    Related: anti-social personality disorder, antisocial, antisocial behavior, antisocial personality disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, disorder, hyperactivity disorder
  • Attention Deficit Disorder Is The Subject Of Two Widely Challenged Debates In Medicinal Practice And Theory One, The Argument - 1,262 words
    Attention deficit disorder is the subject of two widely challenged debates in medicinal practice and theory. One, the argument for ADD being a clinical and mental "disorder", is in favor of medical treatment, claiming the diagnosis is attributable to brain damage or neurological defects. The second gives an alternative idea behind ADD, stating that people showing traits of the disorder often exemplify characteristics such as creativity, inventiveness, and even giftedness. As a rising percentage of children are being diagnosed with the disorder, more and more research has been called for, in an attempt to find an actual cause. ADD is classified as multi-factorial, meaning that multiple reason ...
    Related: attention deficit, attention deficit disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, deficit, deficit disorder, deficit hyperactive disorder, deficit hyperactivity
  • Autism - 1,018 words
    Autism Autism Throughout the years the diagnosis of autism has changed dramatically. Once, it was mistakenly diagnosed as childhood schizophrenia. Now that much more extensive research has been done, researchers have found distinct characteristics that are typical of autistic individuals. It is most often characterized by difficulty in the child's ability to respond to people, events, and objects. Responses to sensations of light, sound, and feeling may be exaggerated. Delayed speech and language may be associated. Other characteristics include: impairment in ability to make peer friendships, absence of imaginative activity, stereotyped body movements, persistent preoccupation with parts of ...
    Related: autism, cognitive functioning, genetic basis, multiple sclerosis, diagnosed
  • Barbara Mason - 1,067 words
    Barbara Mason Human Growth and Development Anne Brooks Lesson 11:Ages 65 on up: Late Adulthood The Results of Aging THEORIES OF WHY WE AGE Since research into aging is not guided by any one universally accepted theory, genetic, cellular, and physiological studies have yielded several hypotheses. Genetics The most popular genetic theory, the Error Theory, assumes that aging is the result of the accumulation of random genetic damage, or from small errors in the flow of genetic information. The damage or errors would reduce or prevent proper cell function. Cellular The best known theory of aging in cellular research is called the Hayflick Effect, which is named after the American microbiologist ...
    Related: barbara, mason, computer software, cognitive functioning, limiting
  • Bartleby The Scrivener: A Strange Relationship - 716 words
    Bartleby The Scrivener: A Strange Relationship The Webster's New World Dictionary defines folie a deux as A condition in which symptoms of a mental disorder, such as delusive beliefs or ideas, occur simultaneously in two individuals who share a close relationship or association. (231) In Melville's Bartleby, the Scrivener this concept of coinciding peculiarity, or obsession is demonstrated quite vividly throughout three different stages. The first, Bartleby's unwavering preoccupation with his employment, followed by his decision to do no work whatsoever, and finally Bartleby's determination to accomplish nothing at all, not even partaking of the basic functions required to sustain life. Duri ...
    Related: bartleby, bartleby the scrivener, works cited, the narrator, interaction
  • Catatonic Schizophrenia - 512 words
    Catatonic Schizophrenia Catatonic Schizophrenia The most uncommon subtype of schizophrenia is catatonia. Although this kind of mental disorder is the rarest of the schizophrenias, it is perhaps the most disturbing to the people inflicted with the illness, and also to the families and friends who encounter the devastating disorder. Whereas paranoid and unorganized schizophrenia are disorders that effect mainly thought and speech behavior, catatonic schizophrenia not only disables speech and thought processes, but it is also a physically disabling illness. Catatonic schizophrenics experience many of the same symptoms as the other types, especially loosely attached thought and speech patterns a ...
    Related: schizophrenia, mental disorder, physical activity, devastating, involving
  • Charles Dickens - 1,014 words
    ... nd his wish to secure a steady income independent of his literary creativity made him plan several ventures in the 1840's. This return to journalism soon proved a great mistake, the biggest fiasco in a career that included nearly no misdirections or failures. He then moved onto a more limited but happier exercise of his talents, for more than a decade he directed a reformatory home for young female delinquents, which was financed by a wealthy friend Angela Burrdett-Coutts. He also used compassionate speaking abilities often in public speeches, fund-raising activities and private acts of charity. His next novel, was called Dombey and Son, written between the years 1846- 1848, it was cruci ...
    Related: charles dickens, hard times, mental disorder, purpose of life, remarks
  • Comparison Of Theories - 1,574 words
    Comparison Of Theories Comparison of Theories 2 Abstract This paper is a comparison of three different viewpoints on the subject of personality. Carl Jung, B.F. Skinner, and Carl Rogers all had very different outlooks on what defined someones personality. As an added feature I have included myself as a theorist because my views are also different from the previous mentioned theorists. This paper will also look briefly into the background of each theorist because their views on life began in their childhood. Amazingly you will notice the all had similar backgrounds, but came up with completely different ways of looking at life. Comparison of Theories 3 Understanding Personality Personality is ...
    Related: comparison, carl jung, different situations, free choice, competitiveness
  • Depression - 1,179 words
    Depression Human nutrition is the study of how food affects the health and survival of the human body. Human beings require food to grow, reproduce, and maintain good health. Without the food our bodies could not stay warm, build or repair tissues, and maintain a good heartbeat. Eating the right foods could help us rid certain diseases or recover faster other illness occur. These and other important functions are dueled by chemical substances in our food called nutrients. Nutrients play a major role in maintaining the bodies organs in functioning at its p0roper level. The Basal Metabolism Rate (BMR) is in influenced by the body site and on state of nutrition. The BMR is an important diagnost ...
    Related: major depression, manic depression, environmental factors, depressive disorder, percentage
  • Discuss Socialpsychological Explanations Given For Schizophrenia - 1,560 words
    Discuss Social/Psychological Explanations Given For Schizophrenia Page 255 Question 4 (a) and (b) DESCRIBE ANY ONE MENTAL DISORDER. DISCUSS SOCIAL/PSYCHOLOGICAL EXPLANATIONS GIVEN FOR THIS DISORDER. SCHIZOPHRENIA Schizophrenia is a serious psychotic disorder that is characterised by a loss of contact with reality. Kraepelin in 1902 originally called schizophrenia Dementia Praecox which is a senility of youth. He believed that the typical symptoms were due to a form of mental deterioration which began in adolescence. Symptoms are mainly disturbances of thought processes but also extend to disturbances of behaviour and emotion. There are two traditional symptom categories of schizophrenia. Acu ...
    Related: paranoid schizophrenia, psychological explanations, schizophrenia, medical research, general public
  • Eating Disorders - 1,123 words
    Eating Disorders 11-2-01 Eating Disorders Bulimia is an illness characterized by uncontrolled episodes of overeating usually followed by self-induced vomiting or other purging. Alternative names for Bulimia are Bulimia Nervosa, Binge-Purge Behavior, and also Eating Disorders. In bulimia, eating binges may occur as often as several times a day. Induced vomiting known as purging allows the eating to continue without the weight gain; it may continue until interrupted by sleep, abdominal pain, or the presence of another person. The person is usually aware that their eating pattern is abnormal and may experience fear or guilt associated with the binge-purge episodes. The behavior is usually secre ...
    Related: binge eating, disorders, eating disorder, eating disorders, eating habits, mental disorder
  • Eating Disorders - 1,310 words
    Eating Disorders In recent history, the idea of feminine beauty has been shifting toward a less healthy, overly thin model. More than 25,000 years ago when humans first evolved, women exaggerated their reproductive organs, like breasts and hips, using fertility symbols. Slim women were not considered beautiful because they did not seem healthy enough to nourish and raise a family, or make it through the winter. Slim women were also considered to be poor, because they could not afford enough food to keep their body full and healthy. During the Renaissance era, beautiful paintings from world famous artists, including Michelangelo, featured full-figured women. Full figures continued to be popul ...
    Related: binge eating, disorders, eating disorders, mental disorder, psychological disorders
  • Eating Disorders: Types And Treatments - 589 words
    Eating Disorders: Types and Treatments People with Bulimia, like those with Anorexia, do not see their bodies realistically. They see themselves in as no matter what the true reflection is. To attain thinness a Bulimic will allow themselves to eat, but then, feel very guilty. As a result of this guilt they will force themselves to throw up, exercise excessively, fast, and often abuse laxatives. This cycle is called binging and purging. A person with Bulimia may range in wieght from slightly underwieght to normal to slightly overweight. This may make it hard to recognize the disorder. Bulimia, like Anorexia , is unhealthy and dangerous because of malnutrition and dehydration. People suffering ...
    Related: drug treatment, eating disorder, eating disorders, treatment options, weight gain
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