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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: meditation

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  • Descartes Meditation One - 925 words
    Descartes Meditation One I am going to discuss Descartes Meditation One: Concerning those things that can be called into doubt. I will analyze and explain what Descartes was trying to do, and explain why (In my personal opinion) that this is nothing but a few wordy paragraphs that have no real value or point to them. In Descartes first meditation he discusses that he has come to the conclusion that many of his beliefs and opinions he had as a child are doubtful. Descartes decides that in order to find out the "truths" he must disprove his current "knowledge." Descartes goes about this by trying to disprove the principles that support everything he believes in, using his Method of Doubt. Desc ...
    Related: descartes, first meditation, meditation, different perspective, personal opinion
  • Descartes Second Meditation - 308 words
    Descartes' Second Meditation In Meditation two, Descartes embarks on his journey of truth. It discusses how a body can perceive things, such as objects. Attempting to affirm the idea that God must exist as a fabricator for his ideas, he stumbles on his first validity: the notion that he exists. He ascertains that if he can both persuade himself of something, and likewise be deceived of something, then surely he must exist. This self-validating statement is known as the Cogito Argument. Simply put, it implies that whatever thinks must exist. Having established this, Descartes asks himself: What is this "I" which "necessarily exists"? Descartes now begins to explore his inner consciousness to ...
    Related: descartes, meditation, second meditation, likewise
  • In The Eight Fold Path Of Yoga Meditation Is The Eighth Step Smith, 11 Once Here - 1,968 words
    In the eight fold path of yoga meditation is the eighth step (Smith, 11). Once here a Yogi must become more aware and more sensitive to what is within themselves (Meditation). A Yogi must first lose themselves here to find peace with themselves (Smith, 11). The armor that a person has built around themselves throughout their lives must be lost and they have to see themselves clearly (Smith, 19). Meditation begins with concentration (Meditation). In concentration meditation a Yogi must focus all their energy onto one thing. Such as an object (a candle flame), a sensation (something felt while walking), or an emotion (love) (Chakras and Meditation). At first it might be hard to keep mind focus ...
    Related: eighth, fold, fold path, meditation, yoga
  • Insight Meditation - 559 words
    Insight Meditation Buddhist meditation practices often emphasize mainly concentration, particularly on a certain person, place or thing. They teach the mind to focus on one point or object, which achieves strength of concentration. The results are peaceful states, and in some very rare cases are said to create supernormal powers. That is no wonder why many people steer in that direction, in hopes of achieving superpowers. Insight meditation is quite different however, and although some degree of concentration is needed, the meditator focuses more on mindfulness of the situation. Insight is defined in the dictionary as the capacity to discern the true nature of a situation. The basis of insig ...
    Related: buddhist meditation, insight, meditation, everyday life, religion
  • Meditation - 403 words
    Meditation ctoria Drizin February 2, 2000 Culture Div. Class Professor Manning My Personal Meditation I was very skeptical and cautious about the lesson on meditation. A few years back I had taken a course on relaxation, which I had found to be only somewhat helpful. I was hoping to find another alternative to calm myself and release the stress. Although I became disbelieving of meditation-I was proved wrong. After you told us to close our eyes, I had a hard time falling into the meditation. At first I felt uncomfortable and distressed. Thoughts kept revolving in my head and I could not get myself to let free. I wondered whether or not the never-ending gibberish you kept repeating was annoyi ...
    Related: meditation, fallen, relaxation
  • Psychology Meditation Websters Dictionary Defines Meditation As To Reflect On Ponder, To Engage In Contemplation, Which It Re - 738 words
    Psychology Meditation Webster's dictionary defines meditation as "to reflect on; ponder, to engage in contemplation," which it really is, although, many people believe that meditation is a means of developing a more spiritual or religious life. Meditation does not necessarily have to be religious. Many people just meditate to relax or organize their thoughts. Meditation is a very broad subject since there are many ways in which to perform meditation. Not only are there many ways but, there are also many different religions associated with meditation. Not only is meditation good for the soul but, it is also good for the mind. I myself have experimented with meditation and have found it to be ...
    Related: dictionary, engage, meditation, psychology, reflect
  • The Second Meditation: I Think Therefore I Am - 1,103 words
    The Second Meditation: I Think Therefore I Am THE SECOND MEDITATION: I THINK THEREFORE I AM --------------------------------------------- "The first precept was never to accept a thing as true until I knew it as such without a single doubt." --Ren Descartes Le Discours de la Mthode, I In the First Meditation, Descartes invites us to think skeptically. He entices us with familiar occasions of error, such as how the size of a distant tower can be mistaken. Next, an even more profound reflection on how dreams and reality are indistinguishable provides suitable justification to abandon all that he previously perceived as being truth. (18, 19) By discarding all familiarity and assumptions, Descar ...
    Related: second meditation, existence of god, first meditation, sensory perception, dreams
  • 5 Page Report On Buddhism - 1,433 words
    5 page report on buddhism To begin this report, I will relate the story of the Buddha. Once a king had a son, his wife dying during labor. The childs name was Siddartha (meaning all wishes fulfilled) Gautama. As the boy grew up, there was a hermit who lived near the castle who saw a shimmering about the castle grounds. Taking this as an omen, the hermit went to the castle. When he saw Siddartha, he foretold that if Siddartha stayed in the palace until he was an adult, he would be a great ruler. But if Siddartha were to leave the palace and go into the world before he was mature, he would become the Buddha and save us all. At first the king was delighted to hear this news. But gradually, he b ...
    Related: buddhism, eightfold path, right effort, western culture, difficulty
  • Afterlife - 1,065 words
    ... ny persons of the anti-Christ religion strongly believe in annihilationism. The living attitude is usually harbored with a lack of conscience and desire for good. It is not considered an "afterlife", but is a strong and constant argument against eternal life. B.B. Warfield claimed that there were three different forms of annihilationism. "Pure Mortalism" holds that the human life is so closely tied to the physical organism that when the body dies, the person as an entity ceases to exist (Erickson, 1237). Due to its pantheistic views, this doctrine hasn't received much attention. The second is "Conditional Immortality", man is a mortal being. Unless God gives you immortality, death is the ...
    Related: afterlife, jesus christ, different forms, ancient religion, dialogue
  • Alcoholics Anonymous - 1,656 words
    Alcoholics Anonymous Defining "Alcoholics Anonymous" Following is the definition of A.A. appearing in the Fellowships basic literature and cited frequently at meetings of A.A. groups: Alcoholics Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength, and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from alcoholism. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop drinking. There are no dues of fees for A.A. membership; they are self-supporting through their own contributions. A.A is not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization, of institution; does not wish to engage in any controversy; neither endo ...
    Related: alcoholics anonymous, anonymous, city hospital, urban areas, prayer
  • Alcoholism - 1,581 words
    Alcoholism Alcoholism is a disease of epidemic proportions, affecting 9.3 to 10 million Americans, and many professionals believe the figures are closer to 20 million (Weddle and Wishon). Alcoholism is a "physiological or physiological dependence on alcohol characterized by the alcoholics inability to control the start or termination of his drinking"(Encyclopedia Britannica 210). It consists of frequent and recurring consumption of alcohol to an extent that causes continued harm to the drinker and leads to medical and social problems. Alcoholism, however, does not merely cause harm to the alcoholic, but to the entire family as well, affecting an estimated 28 million children in this country ...
    Related: alcoholism, high school, human beings, social problems, fail
  • Alternative Medicine - 1,013 words
    Alternative Medicine Alternative Medicine by Joe Grodjesk Sociology Of Medicine Professor Buban May 5, 2001 Alternative Medicine Throughout recorded history, people of various cultures have relied on what Western medical practitioners today call alternative medicine. The term alternative medicine covers a broad range of healing philosophies, approaches, and therapies. It generally describes those treatments and health care practices that are outside mainstream Western health care. People use these treatments and therapies in a variety of ways. Alternative therapies used alone are often referred to as alternative; when used in combination with other alternative therapies, or in addition to co ...
    Related: alternative medicine, chinese medicine, environmental medicine, herbal medicine, medicine, oriental medicine
  • Alternative Medicine - 1,097 words
    ... d physiological processes are closely linked. The connection between stress and immune system response, for example, is well documented (Epiro and Walsh). Some scientists suggest that the power of prayer and faith healing, like some forms of meditation, might also be physiological in that they may protect the body from the negative effects of stress hormone norepinephrine. In addition, experience shows that relaxation techniques can help patients enormously. 'Medicine is a three-legged stool,' says Dr. Herbert Benson of Harvard Medical School (Epiro and Walsh). 'One leg is pharmaceuticals, the other is surgery, and the third is what people can do for themselves. Mind-body work is an esse ...
    Related: alternative medicine, herbal medicine, medicine, modern medicine, sports medicine
  • Ancestor Worship - 1,174 words
    Ancestor Worship 4. Compare and contrast Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism. How are they similar? How are they different? 5. Describe the Chinese tradition of ancestor worship. -Question 4. Buddhism Has over 300 million members, and was founded around 2, 500 years ago in India. The founder is Gautama Siddhartha, the Buddha, or referred to as the Enlightened One. Their major scripture are The Triptaka, Anguttara-Nikaya, Dhammapada, Sutta-Nipata, Samyutta-Nikaya and many others. Buddhism today is divided into three main sects: Theravada, or Hinayana (Sri Lanka, Thailand, Burma, Cambodia), Mahayana (China, Japan, Vietnam, Korea), and Vajrayana (Tibet, Mongolia and Japan). Their Life goal is Ni ...
    Related: ancestor worship, worship, everyday life, famous people, hunting
  • Anselm Of Canterbury - 1,044 words
    Anselm Of Canterbury Anselm concludes that one requires two wills to be free by arguing that to be free is to have an ability. In this paper I will argue that Anselm believes that this ability is incompatible with an Aristotelian doctrine of the will and that to have this ability, we must have at least two wills. Only in such a model is one free. Then I will argue that the agent who abandons justice differs from the one-willed creature Anselm considers in chapter 13,because the latter is not acting freely, whereas the former is acting freely. In the 3rd meditation of Meditations on First Philosophy, Descartes thinks he has proved the existence of God. Given that God is good, and that he exis ...
    Related: anselm, canterbury, first philosophy, existence of god, doctrine
  • Aristophanes, Plautus, And Euripides - 1,236 words
    Aristophanes, Plautus, And Euripides In times of struggle and hardship, people are constantly looking for ways to escape their reality. They have found release from their stress in practices such as exercise, therapy, and meditation. In the ancient times of Greece and Rome, life for the citizens was strict and sometimes harsh. During these times of struggle, people searched for ways to vacation from the laws that bore down upon them. One of the ways they accomplished this was through art. Art was a way to express true feeling and emotion and unite a sometimes-divided population. Drama served as one escape for the citizens in Greece and Rome. Attending the plays written by Euripides, Aristoph ...
    Related: euripides, main character, greece and rome, problems facing, sole
  • Arthur Miller And Tennessee Williams, Including A Streetcar Named Desire - 4,269 words
    ... g the subject matter of Face to Face (1975) overly familiar and rating his English-language The Serpent's Egg (1977) an overall failure. Autumn Sonata (1978) and From the Life of the Marionettes (1980) were critical successes, however, although the latter failed at the box office. Fanny and Alexander (1983), a rich and fantastic portrait of childhood in a theatrical family, was regarded as one of his finest films and won an Academy Award for best foreign language film of 1983. Subsequently, Bergman directed After the Rehearsal (1984), his meditation on a life in the theater. WILLIAM S. PECHTER Bibliography: Bergman, Ingmar, Bergman on Bergman (1973); Cowie, Peter, Ingmar Bergman: A Criti ...
    Related: arthur, arthur miller, miller, named desire, streetcar, streetcar named, streetcar named desire
  • Attention Deficit Disorder Is The Subject Of Two Widely Challenged Debates In Medicinal Practice And Theory One, The Argument - 1,262 words
    Attention deficit disorder is the subject of two widely challenged debates in medicinal practice and theory. One, the argument for ADD being a clinical and mental "disorder", is in favor of medical treatment, claiming the diagnosis is attributable to brain damage or neurological defects. The second gives an alternative idea behind ADD, stating that people showing traits of the disorder often exemplify characteristics such as creativity, inventiveness, and even giftedness. As a rising percentage of children are being diagnosed with the disorder, more and more research has been called for, in an attempt to find an actual cause. ADD is classified as multi-factorial, meaning that multiple reason ...
    Related: attention deficit, attention deficit disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, deficit, deficit disorder, deficit hyperactive disorder, deficit hyperactivity
  • Atticus - 824 words
    Atticus Atticus, a deeply affecting novel by Ron Hansen, opens in winter on the high plains of Colorado to the tropics of Mexico, as well as from the realm of whodunit detective mystery to the larger realm of the Mystery, which has its own heartbreaking, consoling, and redemptive logic. Misunderstanding, dissolute, prodigal, wayward, wastrel, alias, and bribery are only a few words that tell the powerful story of Atticus. The case was labeled as a suicide. The body was identified as forty-year-old Scott William Cody, a blue-eyed white male. The plot of the book takes three sharp turns. It begins as a conventional novel about the relationship between a father and his troubled adult son. After ...
    Related: atticus, second chance, murder mystery, high plains, comprehend
  • Bahai Faith - 1,084 words
    ... ligion. The earth is but one country, and mankind its citizens. Other Bha' principles are the independent investigation of truth, equality of men and women, harmony of science and religion, elimination of extremes of wealth and poverty, universal peace, a world commonwealth of nations, a universal auxiliary language, spiritual solutions to economic problems, and universal education. Along with the main focus of unity, Bah'u'llh also stressed the importance of honesty, chastity, generosity, trustworthiness, purity of motive, service to others, deeds over words and work as a form of worship. What was unlawful and forbidden included lying, killing, stealing, gambling, backbiting and adulter ...
    Related: bahai, in exile, basic principles, human nature, transformation
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