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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: medical treatment

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  • Buckley Jr - 2,713 words
    1. WM. F. BUCKLEY JR. Last summer WFB was asked by the New York Bar Association to make a statement to the panel of lawyers considering the drug question. He made the following statement: We are speaking of a plague that consumes an estimated $75 billion per year of public money, exacts an estimated $70 billion a year from consumers, is responsible for nearly 50 per cent of the million Americans who are today in jail, occupies an estimated 50 per cent of the trial time of our judiciary, and takes the time of 400,000 policemen--yet a plague for which no cure is at hand, nor in prospect. Perhaps you, ladies and gentlemen of the Bar, will understand it if I chronicle my own itinerary on the sub ...
    Related: buckley, illegal drug, medical care, federal government, princeton
  • A Picture Of Colonial Life - 556 words
    A picture of Colonial Life A picture of Colonial Life When the Puritans and Pilgrims were coming to America, they had expected many new opportunities and freedom. They got both--along with loneliness, vulnerability, and ignorance. Now in the new land, they knew very little, except that of their old lives. They had to learn to live new lives, to hunt new and strange game, and experience the feeling of no one being there to help during during difficult times. Sure, they had each other, but when they came up on the shores of this wonderfully new land there was no one there to welcome them with open arms, or nice warm shelter. They knew no one in this new place, and knew nothing of the land. The ...
    Related: colonial, colonial life, everyday life, salem witch trials, medical treatment
  • Abortion Vs Euthanasia - 939 words
    Abortion Vs. Euthanasia When it comes to the question of law, there are endless debates on which laws are just or which are unjust. Euthanasia and abortion are both very serious topics that bring controversy, mainly on whether it should be legal or not. Currently in Canada, abortion is legal, although assisted suicide is illegal. By making euthanasia legal in Canada as well, not only would humans benefit but also the country as a whole. Euthanasia rather than abortion seems to be a more reasonable solution because of the following aspects; the reasoning in making such a decision, the pain and suffering endured, and whether or not human rights are being dishonoured. When a person decides to t ...
    Related: abortion, euthanasia, family member, unborn child, accidental
  • Advances In Medical Technology - 917 words
    Advances In Medical Technology Advances in medical technology have done a great deal to produce miraculous cures and recoveries. In some circumstances however, these advances have created problems for the elderly. More aggressive technology approaches are used to extend the life of the elderly. On the whole the elderly, as well as others, welcome that development -- even if they fear some of its consequences. With these advances it has become possible to keep people in a vegetative state for almost unlimited periods of time. Moreover, there are situations in which neither the patient nor the family has the ability to bring such unhappy circumstances to an end. For this reason, advance direct ...
    Related: medical care, medical practice, medical record, medical technology, medical treatment, technology, technology advances
  • Aids In Detail - 2,050 words
    AIDS In Detail Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Today, despite the continuing production of better antibiotics since the discovery of penicillin, we are facing an infectious disease against which all these drugs are virtually powerless. This disease is spreading inexorably, killing more people and more people each year. AIDS does not know no national boundaries and does not discriminate by race or sex. It is rampaging not only throughout the United States, but also through Africa, India, China, Russia, Europe, South America, and the Caribbean countries. Even infants and children are at risk. AIDS is similar to the bubonic plague or the "BLACK DEATH" that killed perhaps one-third in ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, infectious disease, human immunodeficiency, purple
  • Alcoholism - 1,448 words
    ... 100,000 deaths annually in the United States, and although the number shows little sign of declining, the rate per 100,000 population has decreased since the early 1980s. Accidents, mostly due to drunken driving, accounted for 24 percent of these deaths in 1992. Alcohol-related homicide and suicide accounted for 11 and 8 percent. Certain types of cancer that are partly attributable to alcohol, such as those of the esophagus, larynx, and oral cavity, contributed another 17 percent. About 9 percent due to alcohol-related stroke. Many studies have been made about attitudes toward drinking in different societies. Various surveys show that subgroups within a society or culture do not all have ...
    Related: alcoholism, quality of life, social class, interpersonal relations, follow-up
  • Anna Karenina By Leo Tolstoy 1828 1910 - 1,757 words
    Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy (1828 - 1910) Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy (1828 - 1910) Type of Work: Tragic love story Setting Moscow and St. Petersburg, Russia; nineteenth century Principal Characters Robert Jordan, an American fighting with Spanish Loyalists Anna Karenina, a beautiful young woman Alexey, her cold, vindictive husband Count Vronsky, a young military officer who falls in love with Anna Stepan Oblonsky, Anna's spendthrift brother Dolly, Stepan's frustrated wife Kitty, Dolly's sister Levin, Stepan's rusticc friend, and Kitty's suitor Story Overveiw Stepan Oblonsky's wife Dolly had discovered that her husband was having an affair. With her beauty fading and her household a wreck, ...
    Related: anna, anna karenina, karenina, leo tolstoy, tolstoy
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 1,013 words
    Anorexia Nervosa Many people suffer from the condition known as anorexia nervosa. Often the victims go through a number of symptoms that can lead to a serious amount of problems concerning a persons weight, happiness, and personality. People should keep a close eye out for anyone who shows signs of certain symptoms that become present later on in the future. What is Anorexia Nervosa? In medicine, Anorexia Nervosa is a condition characterized by an intense fear of gaining weight or becoming obese, along with a distorted body image, which leads to excessive weight loss from restricting food intake and exercising excessively. It is essentially self-starvation leading to a loss of body weight 15 ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, nervosa, eating disorder, warning signs
  • Anorexia: A Problem We All Must Face - 1,616 words
    Anorexia: A Problem We All Must Face The World Book Encyclopedia defines anorexia as, one who avoids food for psychological reasons. Most experts believe that those who suffer from anorexia are starving themselves to avoid growing into adults. It is also common knowledge among these experts that anorexics want to gain attention and a sense of being special. People say that anorexia doesn't stop at affecting the victim at hand; instead, it surpasses the anorexic. Which means that anorexia affects the personality of the person; that it branches off to affect other parts of that anorexics life. Body image obsession, self-devotion, attention grabbing, selfishness, are all attributes which keenly ...
    Related: eating disorders, body weight, body image, medication, appealing
  • Assisted Suicide - 596 words
    Assisted Suicide I feel that assisted suicide is a practice that should not only be legally acceptable, but socially acceptable as well. No one should be forced to live a life of pain and suffering. After all, aren't we all guaranteed the rights of life, liberty, and happiness? If happiness means freedom from pain and suffering, then assisted suicide should be legalized. A person willing to help sick people end their suffering should be praised rather than condemned. Some terminally ill patients are forced to face imaginable pain and suffering on a day-to-day basis. This intolerable pain causes these people to experience an unbearably poor quality of life. Yet, if you help these patients end ...
    Related: assisted suicide, suicide, quality of life, federal assistance, jail
  • Assistedsuicide Right Or Wrong - 1,299 words
    Assisted-Suicide Right Or Wrong Assisted-Suicide Right or Wrong Deciding when to die and when to live is an issue that has only recently begun to confront patients all over the world. There is an elderly man lying in a hospital bed, he just had his fourth heart attack and is in a persistent vegetative state. He is hooked up to a respirator and has more tubes and IV's going in and out of his body everywhere. These kinds of situations exist in every hospital everyday. Should physicians or doctors be allowed to assist patients, like this one, in death? Even though, physician-assisted suicide is illegal in the U.S., many doctors are helping suffering patients die. Physicians should not provide t ...
    Related: medical care, physician assisted suicide, prescribe medication, compassionate, consumer
  • Athletic Training - 636 words
    Athletic Training 1. The occupation is an athletic trainer. The job description is to work with athletes in an effort to prevent injuries. They work in amateur and professional sports. Once injuries occur, the athletic trainer is required to evaluate the problem and get the athlete the proper medical treatment. He or she also makes sure that athletes are physically ready and able to play after an injury. Athletic trainers set up physical conditioning programs for athletes, work with equipment managers to make sure that playing and training areas are in working order, and also work with physicians in developing and implementing a rehabilitation program for injured players. Athletic trainers w ...
    Related: athletic, athletic training, hiring practices, high school, injured
  • Attention Deficit Disorder - 1,474 words
    ... clude the symptoms and causes of ADD, and the criteria for it's diagnosis. The criteria for the diagnosis of Attention Deficit Disorder can be found in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition), nicknamed DSM-IV. The DSM-IV was developed in coordination with the tenth edition of the World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases, and groups some 230 psychological disorders and conditions into 17 categories of mental disorders. It is ...the current authoritative scheme for classifying psychological disorders... (Myers 458a) In fact, most North American health insurance companies require a DSM-IV diagnosis before they will pay for ther ...
    Related: attention deficit, attention deficit disorder, deficit, deficit disorder, disorder
  • Attention Deficit Disorder Is The Subject Of Two Widely Challenged Debates In Medicinal Practice And Theory One, The Argument - 1,262 words
    Attention deficit disorder is the subject of two widely challenged debates in medicinal practice and theory. One, the argument for ADD being a clinical and mental "disorder", is in favor of medical treatment, claiming the diagnosis is attributable to brain damage or neurological defects. The second gives an alternative idea behind ADD, stating that people showing traits of the disorder often exemplify characteristics such as creativity, inventiveness, and even giftedness. As a rising percentage of children are being diagnosed with the disorder, more and more research has been called for, in an attempt to find an actual cause. ADD is classified as multi-factorial, meaning that multiple reason ...
    Related: attention deficit, attention deficit disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, deficit, deficit disorder, deficit hyperactive disorder, deficit hyperactivity
  • Autism - 4,335 words
    ... We start with an imagea tiny, golden child on hands and knees, circling round and round a spot on the floor in mysterious, self-absorbed delight. She does not look up, though she is smiling and laughing; she does not call our attention to the mysterious object of her pleasure. She does not see us at all. She and the spot are all there is, and though she is eighteen months old, an age for touching, tasting, pointing, pushing, exploring, she is doing none of these. She does not walk, or crawl up stairs, or pull herself to her feet to reach for objects. She doesnt want any objects. Instead, she circles her spot. Or she sits, a long chain in her hand, snaking it up and down, up and down, wat ...
    Related: autism, genetic basis, mentally retarded, mental retardation, spectrum
  • Black Plague - 1,071 words
    Black Plague Living in Europe in the middle of the 1300s would have been heartbreaking and dreadful. Not only were the living conditions very poor but there was an unknown disease that was wiping out a large percentage of European population. One cannot imagine the fear of wondering whether you or someone you loved was going to catch this deadly disease. No explanation would make a person feel safe from catching it or dying with it. The people of Europe just lived their lives as best they could realizing that nothing they do could ever stop this. They did not have the power to stop this it was far too beyond them. This unknown disease is known as the Bubonic Plague. The plague was passed amo ...
    Related: black death, black plague, bubonic plague, plague, living conditions
  • Bone Fractures - 1,435 words
    Bone Fractures Bone Fractures Thank goodness it's only a fracture. I thought it might be broken. People often think that a fracture is less severe than a broken bone, but fractures are broken bones. To understand why bones break, it helps to know what bones do and what they are made of. The bones of the body form the human frame, or skeleton, which supports and protects the softer parts of the body. Bones are living tissue. They grow rapidly during one's early years, and renew themselves when they are broken. Bones have a center called the marrow, which is softer than the outer part of the bone. Bone marrow has cells that develop into red blood cells that carry oxygen to all parts of the bod ...
    Related: bone, bone marrow, older people, medical treatment, plastic
  • Changing Divorce Laws - 1,989 words
    Changing Divorce Laws In 1995, Statistics Canada data shows that 30% of marriages split (McGovern). Since the 1960's, marriage and divorce have been undergoing profound changes which have altered the meaning of marriage, the chances of its ending in divorce and the circumstances attached to marriage. These changes have made it easier for couples to obtain a divorce due to the changing laws and changing morals of society. The changes include three new grounds needed to prove marital breakdown, such as your spouse committing adultery, your spouse causing mental or physical cruelty or a separation of a year it was previously three years. Divorce also impacts the family as a whole, not only the ...
    Related: after divorce, divorce, divorce laws, divorce rate, free press
  • Chappaquid Will The Truth Be Known - 1,823 words
    ... not state that he had been the driver. According to Gargan's testimony, all Kennedy said was The car has gone off the Bridge down by the beach and Mary Jo is in it. Stranger still is that there was no conversation between the three on the way to the Bridge, and that neither Gargan nor Markham appeared to have looked at Kennedy to see if he needed medical treatment. (When he had told Ray LaRosa to get Gargan and Markham, Kennedy was sitting in the back of a rented white Valiant, outside the Lawrence cottage). He remained in the back seat for the drive to the Bridge. Many investigators have questioned whether the vast amount of damage to the car, including dented passenger doors, dented r ...
    Related: saturday morning, attorney general, district attorney, fashion, oversight
  • Chernobyl - 1,908 words
    Chernobyl Chernobyl Biology 10 Project For Mrs. S. Kolovetsios By Dmitry Neofitides 1/05/99 Contents Introduction The accident Release of radioactive materials Reaction of national authorities Radiation dose estimates Health impact Agricultural and environmental impacts Potential residual risks Conclusion Introduction On 26 April 1986, the Chernobyl nuclear power station, in Ukraine, suffered a major accident that was followed by a contamination of the surrounding area by the large quantities of radioactive substances. The specific features of the contamination favored a widespread distribution of radioactivity throughout the Northern Hemisphere, mainly across Europe. A contributing factor w ...
    Related: chernobyl, psychological effects, health effects, emergency management, anymore
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