Live chat

Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: medical science

  • 30 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • Seeing Well Without Contact Lenses And Glasses Is The Dream Of Millions Of Americans And Modern Medical Science Has Enabled T - 1,410 words
    Seeing well without contact lenses and glasses is the dream of millions of Americans and modern medical science has enabled that dream to come true (Caster, 8). Since first grade, Dede Head, a 30-year-old fitness trainer in North Carolina, has worn glasses to correct sever nearsightedness and astigmatism. Over the years she became accustomed to wearing glasses and contacts, but this has limited many important aspects of her life, including sports. She then heard of a laser eye surgery that "supposedly", helped to correct a persons vision by means of lasers. She immediately signed up for the procedure and ever since that day, she has not worn glasses or contacts. Dede is just one of the eight ...
    Related: dream, glasses, lenses, medical science, science
  • Seeing Well Without Contact Lenses And Glasses Is The Dream Of Millions Of Americans And Modern Medical Science Has Enabled T - 1,408 words
    ... results in the same patient. Each laser pulse in a LASIK procedure removes ten-millionths of an inch of corneal tissue in twelve-billionths of a second while in a PRK procedure, the laser removes about twice as much in about the same time. The amount of corneal tissue removed depends on how nearsighted or farsighted the patient is (Gorman, 60). The more nearsighted a patient is the more tissue must be removed to obtain a flatter cornea, and the same goes with farsightedness, except the cornea has to be made steeper. Back when Barraquer started Keratomileusis In Situ, he noticed that he was having great success with patients who had myopia and did not know why patients who had hyperopia a ...
    Related: dream, glasses, lenses, medical science, science
  • Aids In Detail - 2,125 words
    ... ne anonymous partner per year. Homosexual men have higher rates of sexually transmits diseases than heterosexual men and women because gay men tend to have larger numbers of different sexual partners, more often engage in furtive (anonymous) sexual activities, and more frequently have anal intercourse. PUZZLING SYMPTOMS Any theory of the new disease also had to account for a puzzling factor: the variety of symptoms seen in AIDS patients before they entered the final phase of complete susceptibility to opportunistic infections and cancers. Interviews with AIDS patients revealed many had been very sick for up to a year before they developed their first case of Pneumocystis pneumonia or sho ...
    Related: aids, life expectancy, men and women, hepatitis a, discovery
  • Anemia - 398 words
    Anemia What is Anemia? Anemia is a deficiency of red blood cells or hemoglobin in the blood. The word anemia comes from two Greek roots, together meaning without blood. At the beginning of the nineteenth century, anemia referred to the pallor of the skin and mucous membranes. After medical science advanced, blood cell counts could be done. Anemia became the disease we know today. Symptoms of Anemia Mild anemia may have no outer symptoms. Weakness, fatigue, and pallor are very common symptom. Symptoms of severe anemia are shortness of breath, rapid heartbeat, lightheadedness, headache, ringing in the ears, irritability, restless leg syndrome, mental confusion, dizziness, fainting, and dimmed ...
    Related: anemia, cell anemia, iron deficiency anemia, bone marrow, family history
  • Animal Testing - 953 words
    Animal Testing For centuries, animals have been used in medical research. Since 1875, animal experimentation has been an on going heated debate on whether experiments on animals are ethical. At the very start, the movement against animal testing focused mainly on the "inhumanity of hurting and killing living beings for experimental discovery" (Achor 95). However, in these few decades, scientific invalidity was one of the focusing claims to object to vivisection, which is an "injurious use of animals in laboratories and classrooms, whether for experimentation, product testing, training, or demonstration" (Achor 94-95). Animals are innocent and they are not able to fight back for any means of ...
    Related: animal experimentation, animal research, animal testing, testing, birth defects
  • Assisted Suicide - 1,054 words
    Assisted Suicide It is upsetting and depressing living life in the shadow of death. Many questions appear on this debatable topic, such as should we legalize euthanasia? What is euthanasia? What is assisted suicide? What is the difference between Passive and Active Euthanasia? What is Voluntary, Non-voluntary and Involuntary Euthanasia? What is Mercy Killing? What is Death with dignity? But if euthanasia was legalized, wouldn't patients then die peacefully rather than using plastic bags or other methods? And unfortunately the list continues. No one denies that there are many vulnerable persons who require the protection of the law. Take, for example, those in a temporary state of clinical de ...
    Related: assisted suicide, physician assisted, physician assisted suicide, physician-assisted suicide, suicide
  • Ban Smoking In Public Places - 588 words
    Ban Smoking In Public Places Banning smoking in public places Before people start smoking they have a choice, but once you are a smoker that choice goes and you then become an addict. Smoking is the inhalation and exhalation of the fumes of burning tobacco. The dried leaves of plants are smoked in a pipe or in cigar form, but mostly in cigarettes. European explores arriving in the western hemisphere observed native American smoking leaves of the tobacco plant in pipes, and the practice was introduced onto England in the 1500s. The general attitude was that smoking relieved tension and produced no ill effects. Epidemiologists soon noticed that lung cancer was on the increase. The public at la ...
    Related: banning smoking, passive smoking, public places, smoking, smoking in public
  • Cancer In American - 331 words
    Cancer in American In modern society cancer is the disease most feared by the majority of people throughout the world, supplanting the "white death," or tuberculosis, of the last century; the "black death," or bubonic plague, of the Middle Ages; and the leprosy of biblical times. Cancer has been known and described throughout history, although its greater prevalence today is undoubtedly due to the conquest by medical science of most infectious diseases and to the increased life span of humans. The study of cancer is known as the field of ONCOLOGY. In the mid-1980s nearly 6 million new cancer cases and more than 4 million deaths from cancer were being reported world-wide each year. The most c ...
    Related: american, american cancer, breast cancer, cancer, cancer society, lung cancer, skin cancer
  • Capital Punishment - 1,264 words
    Capital Punishment Sign of the Times The new millenium has ushered in many wonderful things for the world to look forward to such as new advances in medical science, food production technology, and communication systems that allow even the most remote places on earth to a wealth of information instantly. However, many places around the world have taken three steps back in human rights for every step taken in technological advances. Capital punishment heads up this A-list if you will, of crimes against humanity that are carried out in the name of justice each and every day globally. We are inundated with images of violence and so-called reality based TV shows that use shock value to get ratin ...
    Related: capital punishment, punishment, social issues, penalty information center, abuse
  • Catherine The Great - 1,166 words
    ... inst Turkey. Nevertheless, the drafts written by the electives were not wasted, as the materials were employed in a "Description of the Russian Empire and its International Administration and Legal Enactments," published in 1783. This proclamation was the closest thing that Russia had to a law code for the next 50 years (Hosking 100). It denounced capital punishment and torture, it argued for crime prevention and, in general, "was abreast of advanced Western thought for criminology" (Riasanovsky 259). Catherine decided that, before positing common interests, which did not exist, she should put more backbone into fragmented Russia by creating institutions which would enable citizens to wo ...
    Related: catherine, catherine the great, russian empire, everyday life, contribution
  • Chinese Medicine - 1,489 words
    Chinese Medicine Acupuncture, Qigong, and Chinese Medicine Stephen Barrett, M.D. Chinese medicine, often called Oriental medicine or traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), encompasses a vast array of folk medical practices based on mysticism. It holds that the body's vital energy (chi or qi) circulates through 14 channels, called meridians, that have branches connected to bodily organs and functions. Illness is attributed to imbalance or interruption of chi.. Ancient practices such as acupuncture and Qigong are claimed to restore balance. Traditional acupuncture, as now practiced, involves the insertion of stainless steel needles into various body areas. A low-frequency current may be applied t ...
    Related: chinese, chinese medicine, herbal medicine, medicine, oriental medicine, traditional chinese, traditional chinese medicine
  • Cloning - 1,206 words
    Cloning Cloning Twenty-five years ago, scientists thought that cloning was virtually impossible. In the last five years, the science of cloning, has come to realization. What is a clone? A clone is a duplicate - much like a photocopy is a duplicate, or copy, of a document (Kolate, 238). A good example of copies that occur in nature are identical twins, which are duplicates of each other. On a daily basis, molecular geneticists and other scientists use cloning techniques to replicate various genetic materials such as gene segments and cells (Kolate, 238). Recently the cloning of a living life form was brought from the realms of science fiction to reality with the cloning of a sheep named Doll ...
    Related: cloning, human cloning, science fiction, growth hormone, drugs
  • Euthanasia - 626 words
    Euthanasia Euthanasia, which means "good" or "peaceful" death, has been practiced through the ages. Doctors have always been dedicated to the task of easing pain and suffering, to make dying easier. Adding the adjective "active" alters the meaning of euthanasia. The emphasis shifts from comforting the dying to inducing death. The practice of voluntary euthanasia and assisted suicide would cause society to devalue all life, especially the lives of the dying, the disabled, and the elderly. We should not understate the agonies involved in chronic pain and suffering. Nobody wants to see a loved one suffer or make the decisions that accompany medical science's ability to prolong life. The same te ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, human life, human beings
  • Fate Are You Sure - 1,091 words
    Fate? Are You Sure? Bob Walker [English-Shakespeare] As one goes through life, many things shape personality and alter the direction one takes in life. These things usually take the form of events that one can look back on and evaluate; one may say, "I knew I wanted to become [a writer, painter, king]...here," or wish one could go back and do it all again. These 'turning points' are very important, and they may result in drastic changes. These changes, however, may be interpreted as fated (that is, predetermined), self-fulfilling (that is, one's actions result in change), or some combination of both. All three interpretations are fleshed out in some detail in the play "Macbeth" by William Sh ...
    Related: medical science, critical thinking, cause and effect, drastic, irony
  • Fetal Tissue Transplants - 1,664 words
    Fetal Tissue Transplants Is the transplantation of nueral tissue considered an ethical procedure? The transplantation of human fetal neural tissue into the brains of humans suffering from progressive neurodegenerative disorders is one of the hottest arguments currently being debated. Fetal neural tissue is being used as a possible treatment for some diseases. The treatment and possible cure for many of these diseases falls upon the successful transplantation of fetal neural tissue from the brain, spinal chord and peripheral nervous system. Some of the possible beneficiaries of these transplants would be those with Parkinson's disease, a common neurodegenerative disorder of the nervous system ...
    Related: fetal, fetal cells, tissue, major religions, medical science
  • Free Speech And Music - 1,010 words
    Free Speech And Music Paging Mr. Zappa Where's Frank Zappa when you need him? The last time U.S. senators took to wagging their fingers at media executives and threatening legal restrictions if pop culture didn't get just a bit less ... well ... popular, Zappa shook his finger right back. He unleashed a torrent of righteous outrage at the assembled politicos and their busybody wives -- and he even looked cool doing it. One of the political wives to feel Zappa's wrath was Tipper Gore, whose hubby, Al, is currently laying into media executives as the Democratic candidate for president. Along with running-mate Sen. Joe Lieberman, Gore threatened restrictive legislation within six months if the ...
    Related: commercial speech, free market, free speech, music, aggressive behavior
  • Genetic Enhancement - 697 words
    Genetic Enhancement Complaining about What is scarring people in these days is the possibility of cloning discoveries. At this point the question is: how this discovery will affect our society? And what is the scientists goal?. We all are worried about this discovery because what come out from scientists it is not really reassuring. Even scientists dont know what will be the long- terms effects of playing with genes if they might have bad results on patient's descendants. Moreover, by altering the natural course of nature on people, making them thinner, healthier we might increase marginalizazion and discrimination of people who cant or just dont want to be genetically enhanced. In response ...
    Related: enhancement, genetic, special cases, recombinant dna, attractive
  • Genetics - 2,123 words
    Genetics Genetics: Issues of IVF, screening, pre-selection, genetic testing, cloning and the social implications. James Watson once said, We used to think that our fate was in our stars. Now we know that, in large measure, our fate is in our Genes (Jaroff 1998). On June 26th 2000, The Human Genome Project will unveil its rough draft mapping of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences within the human chromosomes (genetic code), to the public. The project has been ongoing since the late eighties, and is a huge international exercise, which has so far cost approximately 3 billion dollars. The final draft is expected to be complete by the year 2003 and the assumption is that it will have a mas ...
    Related: genetic code, genetic disease, genetic disorder, genetic screening, genetic testing, genetics
  • Inuit People - 1,195 words
    Inuit People THE INUIT PEOPLE The Inuit are the northernmost inhabitants of North America. The name INUIT and Eskimo is given to the population of the Arctic region and the region from eastern Siberia to Greenland. The Inuit have been called Eskimo but they really do prefer to be called Inuit. The word Inuit means, people who are alive at this time. Inuit also refers to the group of people of Eskimoid ancestry, which live in northern Canada. The word Eskimo means eaters of raw meat - and in today's time it is insulting to use the term. Eskimo is a word that comes from the CREE. It is a term that honors the ability of this group of people to survive in a harsh climate, living on the products ...
    Related: inuit, north america, indian population, medical science, ancestry
  • Is There A Moral Right To Abortion - 1,724 words
    Is There A Moral Right To Abortion The tragedy of an unwanted pregnancy that threatens a woman's life or health existed in the ancient world as it does today. At the time the Bible was written, abortion was widely practiced in spite of heavy penalties. The Hebrew scriptures had no laws forbidding abortion. This was chiefly because the Hebrews placed a higher value on women than did their neighbors. There are, however, some references to the termination of pregnancy. Exod. 21:22-25 says that if a pregnant woman has a miscarriage as a result of injuries she receives during a fight between two men, the penalty for the loss of the fetus is a fine; if the woman is killed, the penalty is life for ...
    Related: abortion, abortion controversy, moral agent, moral decision, right to life
  • 30 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2