Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: mass communication

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  • 1984 Televisions Vs Telescreens - 1,437 words
    1984 Televisions Vs Telescreens 1984 Televisions Vs Telescreens TV rots the senses in the head! It kills the imagination dead! It clogs and clutters up the mind! It makes a child so dull and blind. He can no longer understand a fantasy, A fairyland! His brain becomes as soft as cheese! His powers of thinking rust and freeze! An excerpt from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, By Roald Dahl, 1964 When George Orwells epic novel 1984 was published in 1949 it opened the publics imagination to a future world where privacy and freedom had no meaning. The year 1984 has come and gone and we generally believe ourselves to still live in "The Land of the Free;" however, as we now move into the 21st Cent ...
    Related: 1984, american television, television programming, violence on television, negative consequences
  • A View Of Modern Societ - 763 words
    A View Of Modern Societ I wrote this to try and take the reader on a journey. What you read here is a direct reflection of the current state of our society. I want to point out to you, the reader, exactly what is happening in the undercurrents of the digital frontier. Each image and video clip that you witness is part of the greater whole of the new Internet society that we all live in. It is your voice that has made this view popular. We are all fed up with the bland and tasteless media that is shoved down our collective throats day after day. When you go outside and see a billboard for GAP clothing or SONY consumer devices you may not realize that you are being programmed with each glance. ...
    Related: university school, mass communication, current state, sony, frontier
  • Advertising, The Good With The Bad - 1,119 words
    Advertising, The Good With The Bad Mass Communication Process Thesis Paper Advertising (Chapter 11) Advertising is a necessary market force that is responsible for the success of most, and involved in all, forms of Multimedia. It is also responsible for some of our most powerful and long-living icons that dominate the American landscape. Advertising, like it or not, is everywhere. It is on buses, billboards and hot-air balloons. It invades our living rooms, our classrooms and almost every aspect of human life. The average American is exposed to 115 advertisements during their morning commute. With this much exposure to the consumer market, one wonders weather or not this is good or bad for t ...
    Related: communication process, natural world, mass communication, drinkers, technological
  • Apocalypses Theme - 1,893 words
    Apocalypses Theme "All I smelled was rotten bodies," Texas Ranger, Roy Coffman said during his testimony at the murder and conspiracy trial of 11 Branch Davidians. The dead were found in the rubble of the April 19 fire that destroyed the compound, killing more than 75 Branch Davidians, including the sect's leader, David Koresh, and 17 children. Perhaps the worst case of the federal government's overreaching in American history, the 1993 Waco tragedy has caused Americans to ask the question of how much military involvement will citizens allow in their everyday lives before they lose their rights as individuals. In February, 1993, 4 federal agents were killed in an assault on the compound of t ...
    Related: apocalypse now, clinton administration, law enforcement, communication quarterly, rarely
  • Beowulf - 545 words
    Beowulf The oldest English epic, Beowulf, although composed twelve centuries ago, uses many of the same ideals and values that exist in modern life and modern literature. These attributes are still important, but they do not occupy every aspect of life as in Anglo- Saxon England. Some of the ideals have little use today, such as fate, while other virtues, such as loyalty, are encouraged and highly respected traits. Other values, like fame, have taken on bad connotations in modern day and are not esteemed as they once were. Fate, the idea that destiny is predetermined and nothing can be done to change that, was highly esteemed in Beowulfs time, but is of little use today. Anglo-Saxon warriors ...
    Related: beowulf, modern life, modern society, mass communication, christian
  • Cell Phones - 1,252 words
    ... are actually taking place, and to thus allow others to feel included at all times. This is clear as Jack, while sick in bed, was unable to attend a basketball game that he previously bought tickets for. Nevertheless, Bob still attended the game, and took his cell phone with him with the intention of calling Jack during the sporting event. Although the television in Jack's home was able to communicate to him every single move and action taken by each player on both teams, Jack nevertheless felt disappointed and unconnected to the game. When Jack suddenly received a phone call from Bob during the last quarter of the game when the favoring team was down by one, Jack became anxious and exci ...
    Related: cell, cell phone, cell phones, verbal communication, mass communication
  • Cherets Lithographic Posters - 499 words
    Cheret`s Lithographic Posters Although lithography was invented in 1798, it was at first too slow and expensive for poster production. Most posters were woodblocks or metal engravings with little color or design. This all changed with Cherets "three stone lithographic process," a breakthrough which allowed artists to achieve every color in the spectrum with as little as three stones - red, yellow and blue - printed in careful registration. Although the process was difficult, the result was a remarkable intensity of color and texture, with sublime transparencies and nuances impossible in other media (even to this day). This ability to combine word and image in such an attractive and economica ...
    Related: industrial age, sunday afternoon, changing times, poster, appeal
  • Computer Science Government Intervention Of The Internet During The Past Decade, Our Society Has Become Based Solely On The A - 1,514 words
    ... ns of encoding data so that only someone with the proper "key" can decode it. "Why do you need PGP (encryption)? It's personal. It's private. And it's no one's business but yours. You may be planning a political campaign, discussing our taxes, or having an illicit affair. Or you may be doing something that you feel shouldn't be illegal, but is. Whatever it is, you don't want your private electronic mail (E-mail) or confidential documents read by anyone else. There's nothing wrong with asserting your privacy. Privacy is as apple-pie as the Constitution. Perhaps you think your E-mail is legitimate enough that encryption is unwarranted. If you really are a law-abiding citizen with nothing t ...
    Related: computer science, government intervention, intervention, science, solely, u.s. government
  • Control Of Internet - 1,523 words
    ... the proper "key" can decode it. "Why do you need" encryption? "It's personal. It's private. And it's no one's business but yours" (Laberis). You may be planning a political campaign, discussing our taxes, or having an illicit affair. Or you may be doing something that you feel shouldn't be illegal, but it is. Whatever it is, you don't want your private electronic mail or confidential documents read by anyone else. There's nothing wrong with asserting your privacy. Perhaps you are not really concerned about encrypting your e-mail because you believe that you have nothing to hide. I mean you havent broken the law in any way, right? Well then why not just write letters on postcards instead ...
    Related: online available, data encryption, the intended, bystander, decoding
  • French Nationalism - 1,440 words
    French Nationalism French and English Clashes in the first decade of the nineteenth century & the Birth of French-Canadian Nationalism For nearly two centuries the inhabitants of New France lived their day to day lives under the French Regime. The colony of New France was shaped by such institutions as the Catholic Church, and the seigneural system. After the Conquest of 1763, the inhabitants of New France now found themselves under the control of the British monarch. However, the life for the inhabitants of New France, virtually remained unchanged. It was not until the American Revolution, that the inhabitants of New France began to feel the British presence. As a result of the American Rev ...
    Related: french canadian, french canadians, nationalism, new france, political system
  • French Nationalism - 1,437 words
    ... n were released from prison, Bedard remained incarcerated for one year. However this incarceration did make Pierre Bedard hostile but rather more determined to win the political system and the English. After his release, Pierre Bedard made this address to his constituents: The Past ought not to discourage us, nor diminish our regard for the constitution. All other forms of government are subject to such abuses . . . All our contestations with the executive have eventuated in developing those advantages the constitution has vested us with. A master-work is best known by its practical operation. To enable us to appreciate the utility of each of the springs in the state machine, we have but ...
    Related: french canadian, french culture, french language, nationalism, chief justice
  • Government And Internet - 1,510 words
    ... ta so that only someone with the proper "key" can decode it. "Why do you need PGP (encryption)? It's personal. It's private. And it's no one's business but yours. You may be planning a political campaign, discussing our taxes, or having an illicit affair. Or you may be doing something that you feel shouldn't be illegal, but is. Whatever it is, you don't want your private electronic mail (E-mail) or confidential documents read by anyone else. There's nothing wrong with asserting your privacy. Privacy is as apple-pie as the Constitution. Perhaps you think your E-mail is legitimate enough that encryption is unwarranted. If you really are a law-abiding citizen with nothing to hide, then why ...
    Related: u.s. government, electronic mail, mass communication, data encryption, enclosed
  • Government Intervention Of The Internet - 1,517 words
    ... ion is a means of encoding data so that only someone with the proper"key" can decode it. "Why do you need PGP (encryption)? It's personal. It's private. And it's no one's business but yours. You may be planning a political campaign, discussing our taxes, or having an illicit affair. Or you may be doing something that you feel shouldn't be illegal, but is. Whatever it is, you don't want your private electronic mail (E-mail) or confidential documents read by anyone else. There's nothing wrong with asserting your privacy. Privacy is as apple-pie as the Constitution. Perhaps you think your E-mail is legitimate enough that encryption is unwarranted. If you really are a law-abiding citizen wit ...
    Related: government intervention, intervention, u.s. government, digital age, political organizations
  • Government Intervention Of The Internet - 1,512 words
    ... oding data so that only someone with the proper "key" can decode it. "Why do you need PGP (encryption)? It's personal. It's private. And it's no one's business but yours. You may be planning a political campaign, discussing our taxes, or having an illicit affair. Or you may be doing something that you feel shouldn't be illegal, but is. Whatever it is, you don't want your private electronic mail (E-mail) or confidential documents read by anyone else. There's nothing wrong with asserting your privacy. Privacy is as apple-pie as the Constitution. Perhaps you think your E-mail is legitimate enough that encryption is unwarranted. If you really are a law-abiding citizen with nothing to hide, t ...
    Related: government intervention, intervention, u.s. government, mass communication, in another country
  • Government Intervention Of The Internet - 1,512 words
    ... oding data so that only someone with the proper "key" can decode it. "Why do you need PGP (encryption)? It's personal. It's private. And it's no one's business but yours. You may be planning a political campaign, discussing our taxes, or having an illicit affair. Or you may be doing something that you feel shouldn't be illegal, but is. Whatever it is, you don't want your private electronic mail (E-mail) or confidential documents read by anyone else. There's nothing wrong with asserting your privacy. Privacy is as apple-pie as the Constitution. Perhaps you think your E-mail is legitimate enough that encryption is unwarranted. If you really are a law-abiding citizen with nothing to hide, t ...
    Related: government intervention, intervention, u.s. government, world wide, digital age
  • Government Intervention Of The Internet - 1,517 words
    ... Encryption is a means of encoding data so that only someone with the proper "key" can decode it. "Why do you need PGP (encryption)? It's personal. It's private. And it's no one's business but yours. You may be planning a political campaign, discussing our taxes, or having an illicit affair. Or you may be doing something that you feel shouldn't be illegal, but is. Whatever it is, you don't want your private electronic mail (E-mail) or confidential documents read by anyone else. There's nothing wrong with asserting your privacy. Privacy is as apple-pie as the Constitution. Perhaps you think your E-mail is legitimate enough that encryption is unwarranted. If you really are a law-abiding ci ...
    Related: government intervention, intervention, u.s. government, mass communication, political organizations
  • Government Intervention On The Internet - 1,528 words
    ... n is a means of encoding data so that only someone with the proper key can decode it. Why do you need encryption? It's personal. It's private. And it's no one's business but yours (Laberis). You may be planning a political campaign, discussing our taxes, or having an illicit affair. Or you may be doing something that you feel shouldn't be illegal, but it is. Whatever it is, you don't want your private electronic mail or confidential documents read by anyone else. There's nothing wrong with asserting your privacy. Perhaps you are not really concerned about encrypting your e-mail because you believe that you have nothing to hide. I mean you havent broken the law in any way, right? Well the ...
    Related: government intervention, intervention, u.s. government, ordinary people, freedom of speech
  • History Of Communication - 1,265 words
    History Of Communication [an error occurred while processing this directive] History Of Communication Since the beginning of time, people have had the need to communicate with one and other. The most common type of communication is speech, but you could not talk to someone who lived 20 miles away. Then written language was developed, people marked symbols on paper, stone, or whatever was available. Then hundreds of years passed, and people who wanted to share their ideas with people had to do allot of writing, until someone thought to make a writing machine. This machine is called the printing press. Gutenberg's invention of the printing press is widely thought of as the origin of mass commu ...
    Related: history, mass communication, modern communication, general public, deaf people
  • Internet History - 1,295 words
    Internet History Starting out as a small military experiment some 35 years ago, the Internet is quickly becoming one of the most popular forms of communication. With a present population of about 40 million users world wide, it seems to have a very promising future. Uncensored and almost impossible to monitor, it's a breeding ground for all sorts of offensive and derogatory information. On the other hand, it is probably the biggest single source of data in the world brought home into your personal computer. Will this form of communication survive in the future, or will it simply die out like many others have in the past? History The first nodes of the Internet were built 36 years ago by the ...
    Related: history, internet history, internet users, internet works, rand corporation
  • Israeliarab Antagonism - 1,338 words
    ... n the resolution of the General Assembly of 29 November in order to make them more equitable, workable and consistent with existing realities in Palestine. A. The area known as the Negeb, south of a line running from the sea near Majdal east southeast to Faluja (both of which places would be in Arab territory), should be defined as Arab territory; B. The frontier should run from Faluja northeast to Ramla and Lydda (both of which places would be in Arab territory), the frontier at Lydda then following the line established in the General Assembly resolution of 29 November. C. Galilee should be defined as Jewish territory. 3) The disposition of the territory of Palestine not included within ...
    Related: united nations, mass communication, west bank, unconditional, galilee
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