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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: marianne

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  • Abortion - 1,731 words
    Abortion Abortion is the ending of pregnancy before birth and is morally wrong. An abortion results in the death of an embryo or a foetus. Abortion destroys the lives of helpless, innocent children and illegal in many countries. By aborting these unborn infants, humans are hurting themselves; they are not allowing themselves to meet these new identities and unique personalities. Abortion is very simply wrong. Everyone is raised knowing the difference between right and wrong. Murder is wrong, so why is not abortion? People argue that it is not murder if the child is unborn. Abortion is murder since the foetus being destroyed is living, breathing and moving. Why is it that if an infant is dest ...
    Related: abortion, induced abortion, pro-life movement, unborn child, candle
  • Alternative Medicine - 1,097 words
    ... d physiological processes are closely linked. The connection between stress and immune system response, for example, is well documented (Epiro and Walsh). Some scientists suggest that the power of prayer and faith healing, like some forms of meditation, might also be physiological in that they may protect the body from the negative effects of stress hormone norepinephrine. In addition, experience shows that relaxation techniques can help patients enormously. 'Medicine is a three-legged stool,' says Dr. Herbert Benson of Harvard Medical School (Epiro and Walsh). 'One leg is pharmaceuticals, the other is surgery, and the third is what people can do for themselves. Mind-body work is an esse ...
    Related: alternative medicine, herbal medicine, medicine, modern medicine, sports medicine
  • Anorexia: A Problem We All Must Face - 1,569 words
    ... and mental health problems and their development usually have a number of different contributing and perpetuating factors, as stated by organizations around the world dedicated to eating disorders. These factors could be any, or a combination of physical, emotional or sexual trauma, cultural emphasis or preoccupation with body image ideals, peer influences, loss and grief, starvation, brain chemistry, purging behaviors, physiological effects of dieting, relationships, stress, coping styles. It is this list that is generally understood universally as the possible causes of all eating disorders, and they apply directly to anorexia. Society plays a role without a doubt, constant pressures s ...
    Related: anxiety disorder, third stage, body image, degradation, plain
  • Death As A Theme In Modern Poetry - 1,603 words
    Death As A Theme In Modern Poetry Death has been and always will be an interesting and compelling topic among poets and authors alike. Death sheds a mysterious vale over life and is often avoided or dreaded within people causing diversity among the reactions of modern poetry and thought. Mortality can be treated as a crisis, a destination, with significance or without, as well as (sadly) by some as a goal. Death provides a wide spectrum of ideas that can be expanded upon with dignity or as a magnanimous ideal. The poets that I have read and pondered deliver an array of insight on the topic; from its grotesqueness to its humbleness. They approach or meditate upon death with disgust as well as ...
    Related: death and dying, poetry, the narrator, dylan thomas, encounter
  • El Greco - 1,808 words
    El Greco The Agony In the Garden, a mannerist style of art by EL Greco, proclaims a sense of spiritual power of religious faith which accomplishes El Grecos aim to move his audience. El Greco was born on the island of Crete and lived from 1541 to 1614. He represented the most characteristic figure of Spanish Mannerism. El Greco was influenced by and became acquainted with the art of Titian and Jacopo Bassano in Venice where he studied in 1566. In addition to visiting Italy, El Greco made his way to Rome, Parma and probably Florence. On his travels he became more familiar with the work of Parmigianino and the work of Correggio. In El Grecos use of form can be seen Florentine Mannerism. Veneti ...
    Related: el greco, greco, religious faith, subject matter, bare
  • Interpretation Of Ibsens A Dolls House - 1,307 words
    Interpretation of Ibsen's "A Doll's House" english interpretation of Ibsen's "A Doll's House" "A Doll's House" is classified under the "second phase" of Henrik Ibsen's career. It was during this period which he made the transition from mythical and historical dramas to plays dealing with social problems. It was the first in a series investigating the tensions of family life. Written during the Victorian era, the controversial play featuring a female protagonist seeking individuality stirred up more controversy than any of his other works. In contrast to many dramas of Scandinavia in that time which depicted the role of women as the comforter, helper, and supporter of man, "A Doll's House" in ...
    Related: a doll's house, dolls house, henrik ibsen, interpretation, real world
  • Jane Austen Quotes - 291 words
    Jane Austen Quotes The following is from The Explicator, a subscription journal available through Herrick's research databases: Jane Austen's irony is endlessly challenging to those of us who like to grasp just how an author achieves distinctiveness and who then want to tell others what we think we have found. No slight part of her ironic effect stems from her use of the free indirect style (style indirect libre), as Graham Hough,(FN1) among others, has shown. The quote below is from Studies in English Literature, another journal available through Herrick's research databases: If Marianne's later walks at Cleveland do receive a faintly satirical treatment, it is not because she seeks out the ...
    Related: austen, jane, jane austen, gale group, william collins
  • Jane Austen: Background Of Her Novels - 1,238 words
    ... lancingly to the slave trade and slavery in her novels, though she was aware of contemporary debates on the subject. Mansfield Park was one of only two of Jane Austen's novels to be revised by her after its first publication, when a second edition came out in 1816 (this second edition was a failure in terms of sales). Emma Emma, published in 1815, has been described as a "mystery story without a murder". The eponymous heroine is the charming (but perhaps too clever for her own good) Emma Woodhouse, who manages to deceive herself in a number of ways (including as to who is really the object of her own affections), even though she (and the reader) are often in possession of evidence pointi ...
    Related: jane, jane austen, novels, sense and sensibility, mansfield park
  • Josephine Baker - 1,442 words
    ... circles. Varna produced the show Paris qui Remue, which featured Baker singing in French and wearing glamorous costumes. By the end of the 1930's, "she ventured outside the music hall into two other professional areas. One was a motion picture . . . and the other . . . was light opera."# Baker starred in two films, Zou-Zou, the story of a laundress who becomes a music hall star, and Princesse Tam-Tam. Jacques Offenbach's operetta La Creole, a light opera about a Jamaican girl, was Ms. Baker's most challenging role thus far. It opened at Theatre Marigny in Paris on December 15, 1934, and had a successful run for six months. In 1935, Baker decided she wanted to return to the United States. ...
    Related: baker, josephine, lincoln memorial, wonderful world, american
  • Mary Shelley And Frankenstein - 1,744 words
    Mary Shelley And Frankenstein Godwin Shelley was the only daughter of William Godwin and Mary Wollenstonecraft, a quite dynamic pair during their time. Mary Shelley is best known for her novel Frankenstein: or The Modern Prometheus, which has transcended the Gothic and horror genres that now has been adapted to plays, movies, and sequels. Her life though scattered with tragedies and disgrace, was one of great passion and poetry, which I find quite fascinating, but not desirable. Shelleys other literary works were mildly successful their time, but are little known today. Her reputation rests, however, on what she once called her "Hideous Progeny," Frankenstein. To understand her writing you m ...
    Related: bysshe shelley, frankenstein, mary, mary jane, mary shelley, mother mary, percy bysshe shelley
  • Moderate Drinking - 995 words
    Moderate Drinking Moderate Drinking Alcoholism is a serious subject that relates to everyone in our society. The question of whether alcoholism should be allowed or not, forms an argument whether alcohol if drank in moderation is good for recovery or not. Many people drink in moderation to control their drinking problems, but the counter argument says it's addictive. Not only are they destroying their liver, but they are also taking a risk of getting in trouble by the law. There are a lot of issues that come up about drinking, but maybe these people can not stop one day to the next. It doesn't make them bad people if they are trying to quit by drinking in moderation. It seems that in our soc ...
    Related: drinking, moderate, support groups, cultural factors, tension
  • Motor Training - 2,108 words
    ... h, and Bryant Crate. Marianne Frosting has a test based system (Gearheart, 1973). The classroom teacher may administer her test in groups. She has five subtests which measure various skills which she states "are necessary to success in academics". She has a series of training exercises in both gross and fine motor skills. Her test is limited to visual-perceptual skills, and the program is basically a visual-perception program. Musk Moisten (Hellmuth, 1968) involves a theoretical framework in which a child can be led in an orderly manner from situations in which he simply responds to commands, to situations in which he actively engages in problem solving and can see for himself the qualit ...
    Related: motor, motor development, motor skills, training program, saint louis
  • Piute Indians - 1,119 words
    Piute Indians The Paiutes, or Piutes (pronounced PIE-oot), included many different bands, spread out over a vast region. They are recognized as some of the North American Indian tribes. They are usually organized into two groups for study: the Northern Paiutes and the Southern Paiutes. The northern branch occupied territory that is now northwestern Nevada, southeastern Oregon, southwestern Idaho, and northeastern California. The southern branch lived in territory now part of western Utah, southern Nevada, northwestern Arizona, and southeastern California. The Northern and Southern Paiutes spoke varying dialects of the Uto-Aztecan language family, related to the Shoshone dialect. The name Pai ...
    Related: native americans, great basin, ghost dance, highlands, frontier
  • Rite Of Passage - 201 words
    Rite Of Passage Rite Of Passage What is rite of passage? According to, The World Book Dictionary, the rite of passage is a ceremony that marks such occasions as birth, naming, puberty, and marriage. Marianne Williamson observed that Rites of Passage provide structure of energy by which we alchemize our experiences of the most significant junctures in life. They fortify our spirits, that nobility and transcendence might be more than just words. They remind us of our oneness and form society's connective tissue. As extensions of prayer, they are words that take us beyond words. My own understanding of rite of passage is a change or turning point in someone's life that is utterly significant. R ...
    Related: rite, rites of passage, everyday lives, social issues, oneness
  • Sense And Sensibility - 438 words
    Sense and Sensibility Sense and Sensibility In Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility the title is a metaphor for the two main characters. Marianne who represents Sensibility, and Elinor who represents Sense. We find out early on that Elinor does not share her feelings. When Edward comes into the story there is an immediate attraction. Elinor tells no one of her feelings. It is just assumed that they are meant for each other. When Edward has to leave Elinor does not say anything. Edward does promise he will come down to there cottage and deliver an atlas for Margaret. When the atlas comes and not Edward, the only one who ends up crying is Margaret and not Elinor. We do learn however that Elinor ...
    Related: sense and sensibility, sensibility, jane austen, austen, crying
  • Sense And Sensibility Book Report - 1,708 words
    Sense and Sensibility Book Report Sense and Sensibility Book Report Book Report - Sense and Sensibility 1.) In Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility, the title is a metaphor for the two main characters Elinor and Marianne. Elinor represents sense and Marianne represents sensibility. We find out early that Elinor does not share her feelings. When Edward comes into the story, there was an immediate attraction. She tells no one of her feelings. It was just assumed that they are meant for each other. When Edward has to leave, Elinor says nothing. Edward does promise he will come down and give Margaret an atlas. When the atlas comes and not Edward, the one who ends up crying was Margaret and not Eli ...
    Related: book report, sense and sensibility, sensibility, more important, social class
  • Snese And Sensibility - 1,926 words
    Snese And Sensibility Having a strong heart like Elinor and a latent sense similar to Marianne, Jane Austen displayed her characteristics through her characters. Elinor and Marianne were two main characters that Jane Austen used to display her true character. Elinor is very devoted to her family and tries to do everything she can to support them. Every now and then, when the family is in need of advice, they would all look to Elinor. Marianne was the younger daughter in the family of three sisters and she is always caught up in romantic poetry. At one time in the novel, Marianne went through a catastrophe because the love of her life had left her. Marianne tries to hide her fear to avoid all ...
    Related: sense and sensibility, sensibility, single women, domestic life, magnificent
  • Sport Psychology - 1,008 words
    Sport Psychology In our society today it seems like sports rule the land. Everywhere we look, there is some kind of sporting event going on or being televised. Almost everyone could be considered a fan of at least one sport. Some people follow sports like a religion. With such an increased focus on sports, the athletes performances are put under a microscope. This puts more pressure on athletes to give a winning performance. No longer do athletes play for fun, they play to win. This isnt happening just on the professional level; it is happening on all levels of sport. From little league to backyard football, the goal is to win at all cost. With this increase pressure, athletes are looking fo ...
    Related: clinical psychology, psychology, sport psychology, sports psychology, mental health
  • Stress - 1,816 words
    stress Psychological stress is a result of many factors and should be dealt with very carefully. Stress can be defined as a set of interactions between the person and the environment that result in an unpleasant emotional state, such as anxiety, tension, guilt, or shame (swin pg 1). Another way of putting it, is that there are somethings that put certain demands on us. The effects of stress should not be limited to unpleasant emotional states. Many studies have concluded that the effects on our physical health from stress can be extremely detrimental. These adverse physical effects include heart disease and formations of cancer. There are also some societal issues that psychological stress c ...
    Related: reducing stress, lung cancer, heart disease, everyday life, corey
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