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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: manifest

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  • Manifest Destiny - 685 words
    Manifest Destiny MANIFEST DESTINY Manifest Destiny took place in the US in the mid-1800. Manifest Destiny was used among the Americans in the 1840's as a defense for U.S. territorial expansion. It is the presumption that God had destined the American people to at divine mission of American movement and conquest in the name of Christianity and democracy. In order to understand manifest destiny we must first find its' origin. John O'Sullivan first initiated manifest destiny into America in 1845. This New York editor wrote the phrase that captured this mood when he attempted to explain American's thirst for westward expansion he wrote: the fulfillment of our manifest destiny to overspread the c ...
    Related: destiny, destiny manifest destiny, manifest, manifest destiny, westward expansion
  • Manifest Destiny - 660 words
    Manifest Destiny During the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries the United States saw many problems come and go. Some problems were more important than others, however all led to further division of American politics. The most divisive issue in American politics during this time frame was the idea of Manifest Destiny, or territorial expansion. Manifest Destiny was the idea that it was the United States' destiny to take over all of North America from the Atlantic to the Pacific. Most of the public was in favor of territorial expansion, though some politicians felt it contradicted the constitution. Strict constructionists were against territorial expansion, while loose constructioni ...
    Related: destiny, manifest, manifest destiny, north america, american history
  • Manifest Destiny - 660 words
    Manifest Destiny MANIFEST DESTINY The idea of Manifest Destiny was based on the idea that America had a divine providence. It had a future that was destined by God to expand its borders, with no limit to area or country. All the traveling and expansion were part of the spirit of Manifest Destiny, a belief that it was God's will that Americans spread over the entire continent, and to control and populate the country as they see fit. Many expansionists conceived God as having the power to sustain and guide human destiny. It was white man's burden to conquer and Christianize the land Though the idea was revolutionary for the US, it was nothing new for the world. The idea of conquering other lan ...
    Related: destiny, destiny manifest destiny, manifest, manifest destiny, divine right
  • 3 Non Traditional Religions Voodoo, Spiritualism, Cults - 2,024 words
    3 Non Traditional Religions Voodoo, Spiritualism, Cults Religion is primary agent of social control in our society. Due to its communally held beliefs and principles, we have a foundation on which we can rest the laws, values, and the main doctrine, of almost any society. Here in America, we have tremendous freedom in both establishing and in choosing the religion of our choice. This freedom has given birth to many non-traditional religions and practices. When discussing the topic of social control and order within a society, these non-traditional religions can be used very strongly to bring about social change within an individual then into the population. On the rise in our nation, is the ...
    Related: catholic religion, west indies, social change, catholic church, music
  • The Question Of Being: What It Is, Why It Matters - 1,317 words
    "The Question Of Being": What It Is, Why It Matters. Martin Heidegger attempts to answer the "question of Being" by appealing to the terminology and methodology of Dasein, most commonly defined as existence. Dasein is not simply any kind of existence, however, but an existence that is unique from all other existences in that it asks the question of existence while existing in the existence itself. In other words, one must first understand Dasein in order to understand Being because Dasein is a kind of being that is concerned about its very Being. Contrary to the popular opinion that in order to truly and clearly comprehend any phenomenon, the subject which interrogates must necessarily stand ...
    Related: thomas aquinas, martin heidegger, true meaning, reflective, disclosure
  • A Journey Though The Golden Gates Of Promise - 2,284 words
    ... because, without them, the United States would become overpopulated and it would slowly deteriorate. If Congress did not create the quota laws as a way to control who is allowed to enter the country, it would leave the magnificent "Golden Gates" open to anyone who wanted to enter the promise land. It is insane to even consider letting everyone of every ethnicity into the United States because the results would be devastating for the American society. American citizens often criticize that the quota laws discriminate towards different ethnic groups, but, in reality, it is common sense to prefer letting immigrants into the country that are more likely to "fit in" with the cultures being p ...
    Related: golden, promise, another country, labor laws, reject
  • A Myriad Of Mysteries Is Contained In The Pages Of The Old Testament For Centuries, Scholars Of Theology, Archeology And Anth - 1,419 words
    A myriad of mysteries is contained in the pages of the Old Testament. For centuries, scholars of theology, archeology and anthropology have labored to produce some explanation of the contradictions and impossibilities put forth in these texts. The ancient ruins of lost cities reveal evidence that some writings may be incorrectly dated, or even that they may be false. Faith and tradition give way to speculation that the Bible may be nothing more than a collection of ancient Israelite mythology. Some things, however, prove tantalizingly true. Temple Judaism and its monarchy, for example, are historical fact; the records of surrounding civilizations corroborate the chronicling of their place in ...
    Related: anth, archeology, myriad, pages, testament
  • A Reaction To Uncle Toms Cabin - 1,386 words
    ... ill a young boy, his father sold Uncle Tom to the slave trader Mr. Haley. Growing up on a southern plantation, George naturally inherited the slave-owning tradition of his culture. When he found the beaten and dying Uncle Tom, however, his perception immediately changed and he vowed to "do what one man can to drive out this curse of slavery from my land! (p.455)" It was George who buried Uncle Tom, and he then returned home to free all of his own slaves. George was an admirable character because he demonstrated growth and integrity and illustrated that the inveterate rationalization of slave-owning was one that was not immutable. I also feel that the character of Mr. Wilson is one that c ...
    Related: cabin, toms, toms cabin, uncle, uncle tom's cabin, uncle toms cabin
  • A World Of Diversity - 614 words
    A World of Diversity Ethnocentric, derived from the Greek words of Ethnos, meaning race, people or cultural group, and Kentrikos, meaning concentrated about or directed to a center is a word that greatly describes many cultures on this planet we call Earth . The official definition of Ethnocentric is " characterized or based on the attitude that ones own group is superior" or "having race as a central interest". There is a whole world of problems, politics, and, other cultures, but it seems that the average Americans only interest is that of themselves. The reason I chose to focus more on the American being ethnocentric is because I have been exposed the most to this culture. Why is it that ...
    Related: diversity, world politics, world view, foreign countries, simon fraser university
  • Adjustment Disorder With Depressed Mood - 1,468 words
    Adjustment Disorder With Depressed Mood Running Head: ADJUSTMENT DISORDER WITH DEPRESSED MOOD CAUSE Adjustment Disorder with Depressed Mood, Cause and Affect Abstract Research was conducted to investigate Adjustment Disorder with Depressed Mood, and some causes, affects, and treatment approaches. Not all individuals manifest or demonstrate the same depressive symptoms, which can make it difficult for clinicians to diagnose and treat. The American Psychiatric Association has categorized various depressive disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders fourth edition (DSM-IV, 1994). Researchers have investigated the validity of the DSM diagnostic criteria over the year ...
    Related: adjustment, depressed, disorder, mood, treating depression
  • Advances In Medicine - 1,318 words
    Advances In Medicine As the history of medicine has evolved, a number of trends and prevailing opinions have swept the profession. One of the most subtle, and yet most revealing results of these sweeping trends manifests itself by altering the tone in medical conversations and dialogues, often available to the non-medical person in the form of texts and literature. A relatively current example appears in the form of Perri Klass A Not Entirely Benign Procedure, a text dedicated to the experiences of the author at Harvard Medical School. Published in 1987, Klass work offers an interesting, if not shocking comparison to Philippe Pinels The Clinical Training of Doctors, an article published in 1 ...
    Related: medicine, modern medicine, personal perspective, patient care, enthusiasm
  • Adventurism In Human Nature - 843 words
    Adventurism In Human Nature Human history is littered with example where a few individual risked life and limbs to venture into the unknown, which then came to be discovered, thanks to their spirit of adventurism or as some would say, fool hardy bravado. Of course, certain names come to mind, Christopher Columbus, Captain James Cook, Lois and Clark etc. There is another side to this tale of fame as well. Even the success stories sometimes had a ring of failure about itself. A person might be a pioneer in the field of discovery but the fruits of his labor are enjoyed by those who follow him. He might in fact have served as an expendable instrument in the road to discovery, in the big schemes ...
    Related: human history, human nature, human spirit, to build a fire, captain james cook
  • Air Traffic Strike - 4,516 words
    ... emands rested upon prevailing norms of workers' interests and power. Since World War II, labor leaders have placed a disproportionate amount of emphasis on economic gains, and the collective bargaining process has gravitated toward these areas. At the same time, management has carefully guarded its prerogatives from the bargaining process.24 In this context, it seems likely that in envisioning a future strike, controllers felt that wages could and should be one aspect of it. Yet wages were not the decisive factor for most, and their other demands, derived from a far more vital, ideological interest than economic gains, evoked their passionate and surprisingly unified response. Individual ...
    Related: strike, traffic, traffic control, traffic controllers, worlds apart
  • Alcoholism - 2,059 words
    Alcoholism alcoholism Definitions and causal factors of alcoholism Alcoholism consists of a repetitive intake of alcoholic beverages to an extent that the drinker is harmed. The harm may be physical or mental; it may also be social or economic. Implicit in the conception of alcoholism as a disease is the idea that the person experiencing repeated or long-lasting injury from his drinking would alter his behaviour if he could. His failure to do so shows that he cannot help himself, that he has lost control over drinking. This conception incorporates the idea of addiction or dependence. Formal definitions of alcoholism vary according to the point of view of the definer. A simplistic, old-fashio ...
    Related: alcoholism, affective disorder, social factors, world war ii, relation
  • America Has Seen A Great Amount Of Social Change During The Past Few Decades From They Way We Eat To The Way We Treat Our Cri - 694 words
    America has seen a great amount of social change during the past few decades. From they way we eat to the way we treat our criminals to the safety of our children at school, things have definitely changed. The rash of recent school shootings is a sure sign of the breakdown in parenting and a lack of family values being taught to our children. The highly processed foods that we are eating have led to a nation, which is severely overweight and ill. The Criminal Justice system in this country is a joke; it has been shown to be biased against minorities and the poor. A guilty rich man is known as a free man, while a poor murderer is destined for years on death row. In the Kip Kinkel article we a ...
    Related: america, corporate america, social change, social changes, social structure, social structures
  • American Expansion - 214 words
    American Expansion In a sense, the United States has been expansionistic from its very beginning. The 13 English colonies, clinging to the eastern seaboard, were determined to push westward despite all natural and political obstacles. Once established as a nation, the United States went about acquiring even more land, including Florida, the Louisiana Purchase, and the Mexican Cession. The expansion associated with the late nineteenth century was just one chapter in a long book. One can begin writting a paper anout expansion of the U.S. beginning with the founding of the colonies. Colonial expansion involved many resons- land hunger, flight from religious persecution, etc.- The next main expa ...
    Related: american, american expansion, expansion, spanish american, open door
  • American Imperialism - 417 words
    American Imperialism The United States became an imperialist nation at the end of the 19th century because Americans wanted to expand over seas with their belief in manifest destiny. The three factors that started American imperialism were political and military competition including the creation of a strong naval force, economic competition among industrial nations and a belief in the racial and cultural superiority of people of Anglo-Saxon decent. The Spanish American War marked the emergence of the United States as a world power. This brief war lasted less than four months from April 25 to August 12, 1898. A number of factors contributed to the United States decision to go to war against ...
    Related: american, american imperialism, central american, imperialism, latin american, spanish american
  • American Revolution - 3,384 words
    American Revolution In the aftermath of the French and Indian War, Britain needed a new imperial design, but the situation in America was anything but favorable to change. Long accustomed to a large measure of independence, the colonies were demanding more, not less, freedom, particularly now that the French menace had been eliminated. To put a new system into effect, and to tighten control, Parliament had to contend with colonists trained in self-government and impatient with interference. One of the first things that British attempted was the organization of the interior. The conquest of Canada and of the Ohio Valley necessitated policies that would not alienate the French and Indian inhab ...
    Related: american, american affairs, american colonies, american population, american revolution, american revolutionary, american revolutionary war
  • Analisis Of Tobias Wolff - 1,408 words
    Analisis Of Tobias Wolff Tobias Wolff is a strange writer whose work is so absolutely clear and hypnotic that a reader wants to take it apart and find some simple way to describe why it works so beautifully(Tobias Wolff, This Boys Life [back cover]). Although sometimes taking place in such foreign locations as Vietnam, Wolffs stories are predominantly based on banal situations and people. The magic in his writing though is the fact he draws the reader into the story at all times. He does so by connecting his characters and their conflicts to the reader, be it through quirks, qualities or quandaries. Wolff perfects these concepts by writing in his own lucid, terse style. The tales in Wolffs [ ...
    Related: analisis, tobias, wolff, good friends, north american
  • Analytical View Of James Joyces Araby - 1,085 words
    Analytical View Of James Joyces' Araby # Goldstein ## Sara Goldstein Ernst Narrative Fiction 22 October 2000 An Analytical View of Araby Viewpoints from which stories are written are used to enhance the overall point a story is making. James Joyces Araby is no exception. Narrated by a young boy of about twelve or thirteen, it depicts his personal coming of age. The usage of a first person narration allows the reader to see things the way the boy sees them; be as innocent and wistful as he is, thus feeling the incredible intensity of his eventual realization. In addition to this coming of age theme, intricately woven throughout are hints to Joyces contemptuous view of Roman Catholicism, as we ...
    Related: analytical, araby, james joyce, the narrator, roman catholic
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