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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: accredited

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  • 1984 - 1,015 words
    1984 1. Biography George Orwell is the pen name of Eric Arthur Blair, a British writer with political conscience. He was born in India but educated in England at Eton College. He served the Indian Imperial Police in Burma from 1922 to 1927. In sick health, he returned to Europe to live in poverty as a struggling writer. Orwell joined the Republican forces in the Spanish civil war, and wrote a chilling account of this experience. He went on to write many books, mostly autobiographical, and achieved successes as a brilliant writer. 2. Synopsis The novel takes place in a theoretical and fictional dystopian totalitarian society. The story begins in London on April 4, 1984 after an atomic world w ...
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  • Affirmative Action - 1,120 words
    ... continue. Affirmative Action Affirmative action has been the subject of increasing debate and tension in American society. Affirmative action is the nations most ambitious attempt to redress the issues of racial and sexual discrimination. According to the University of Rhode Island, Affirmative action is defined as, the specific actions in recruitment, hiring, upgrading and other areas designed and taken for the purpose of eliminating the present effects of past discrimination, or present discrimination (www.riuniversity.edu , 8). This allows minorities and women to be given special consideration in education and many other areas. The need for affirmative action is essential to college a ...
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  • Alcohol And Drug Abuse Among College Students - 906 words
    Alcohol And Drug Abuse Among College Students Jon Rigell English 101-07 Cause and Effect Essay Dangerous Acts Alcohol and drug abuse has been an active habit among college students sense the 1960s. The immediate cause of this behavior was the youth's need to rebel against the overly conservative American society. This rebellion led to a since of freedom for the young adults, which caused them to continue acting in these unintelligent manners. After a short period of time, late teens just did not belong if they were not participating in the mischievous acts. Substance abuse quickly became a way of life for many young adults. As a result, this inapt behavior still continues today. To first-tim ...
    Related: abuse, alcohol, alcohol and drugs, college campus, college students, drug abuse, students fail
  • Alternative Medicine - 1,013 words
    Alternative Medicine Alternative Medicine by Joe Grodjesk Sociology Of Medicine Professor Buban May 5, 2001 Alternative Medicine Throughout recorded history, people of various cultures have relied on what Western medical practitioners today call alternative medicine. The term alternative medicine covers a broad range of healing philosophies, approaches, and therapies. It generally describes those treatments and health care practices that are outside mainstream Western health care. People use these treatments and therapies in a variety of ways. Alternative therapies used alone are often referred to as alternative; when used in combination with other alternative therapies, or in addition to co ...
    Related: alternative medicine, chinese medicine, environmental medicine, herbal medicine, medicine, oriental medicine
  • Anesthesiology And Nursing - 1,416 words
    Anesthesiology And Nursing Who would have thought that a small carbon based organic compound such as ether would spawn a new field of medical specializations, changing the history of medicine for ever. Ether was discovered in 1275 by a Spanish chemist named Raymundus Lullius,(Evans,1995,p 1). It was his discovery that allowed William E. Clark to use ether as an anesthetic for the first time in 1842. He administered the ether on a dental patient for Elijah Pope as he performed a dental extraction on Miss Hobbie,(Evans,1995.p 1). This was the first step in the creation of the field of anesthesia. This new technology was quickly put to use to relieve pain in all areas of medicine, and its use w ...
    Related: nursing, current trends, registered nurse, care financing, rewarding
  • Anna Karenina - 1,352 words
    Anna Karenina Leo Tolstoy's novel, Anna Karenina, upon its release received a mix critical reception, with Russian critics either condemning or applauding the novel primarily on its views of Russian society. Thematically, the novel parallels its heroine's, Anna Karenina, moral and social conflicts with Constantin Levin's internal struggle to find the meaning of life. There are many others underlying themes which links the novel as a whole, yet many critics at the time only looked upon its critical view of Russian life. Henry James called Tolstoy's novels as "loose and baggy monsters' of stylessness, but Tolstoy stated of Anna Karenina ".....I am very proud of its architecture--its vaults are ...
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  • Ben Franklin - 1,563 words
    Ben Franklin Benjamin Franklin was one of the most influential people in American history. Franklin was born on January 17, 1706, in a small town in Boston. Benjamin was one of ten children. His father, Josiah was a candle and soap maker, and his mother Abiah Folger was a homemaker. When Benjamin was only twelve years old he signed his identures so that he could apprentice under his brother, working at a printing press. Here he worked for his brother James for over nine years. Benjamin had enormous talent, and after his apprenticeship was up, he got a job printing for the Boston Gazette. However this did not last very long, after only ten months Franklin's contract was given to someone else. ...
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  • Beruit To Jerusalem - 1,061 words
    ... everyone has to secure the food and shelter for their own tribe even if it means at the expense of another tribe. To them, they cannot live in peace with each other because they are constantly competing with each other to survive. The second political tradition is the concentration of power in a certain elite group. This can be accredited to the tribalism, which believes in loyalties to the men who protect them from enemies. There is of course more then one type of authoritarianism; Friedman named one gentle authoritarianism and the other brutal authoritarianism. The third tradition is a tradition that was imposed by the Europeans and that is of a modern nation-state. As one can see it ...
    Related: jerusalem, international relations, holy land, another country, shelter
  • Borrowed Ethics - 2,834 words
    Borrowed Ethics Borrowed Ethics The past three decades have witnessed a remarkable growth in private Christian education, both in Christian day schools and in homeschooling. The effort has not been in vain. Standardized test scores repeatedly show that students in private Christian education far outpace their counterparts in public schools. It is reported that all homeschool students applying at Harvard last year were accepted.[1] On the other hand, public schools continue to deteriorate- academically, morally and in safety. The number of shootings and killings in public schools last year, even by little boys, have shaken our nation into disbelief. We keep asking, Why? The answers are as var ...
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  • Chinese Medicine - 1,419 words
    ... tions. A parallel survey of 197 acupuncturists, who are more apt to see immediate complications, yielded 132 cases of fainting, 26 cases of increased pain, 8 cases of pneumothorax, and 45 other adverse results [10]. However, a 5-year study involving 76 acupuncturists at a Japanese medical facility tabulated only 64 adverse event reports (including 16 forgotten needles and 13 cases of transient low blood pressure) associated with 55,591 acupuncture treatments. No serious complications were reported.The researchers concluded that serious adverse reactions are uncommon among acupuncturists who are medically trained [11]. Questionable Standards In 1971, an acupuncture boom occurred in the Un ...
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  • Christianity In Nigeria - 951 words
    Christianity In Nigeria Ashley Gulke Prfessor Haas Compostion 2 27 April 2001 Independent Churches in Nigeria Several religions coexist in Nigeria, helping to accentuate regional and ethnic distinctions (Kane 86). Religion is often times the source of customs, culture, happiness and wars: it influences nearly every facet of our life. In Nigeria, the main religions are Christianity, paganism, and Islam. Christianity began to spread in the 19th century and has continued to spread up through the 21st century. The major spread of the Christian church in Nigeria is clearly credited to the independent churches of the Nigerian people. Portuguese Catholic priests, who landed on the shore of Nigeria ...
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  • Clinical Psychology - 1,054 words
    Clinical Psychology Clinical Psychology The word psychology can translate to mean "the science of the soul." Since Aristotle, psychology has become both a science and a profession. As a profession, it is the application of understanding people and their behavior to help solve human problems (Careers, 1993). A psychologist usually concentrates on one specialty that is of particular interest. There are many different fields of psychology to study. Clinical psychologists work with people with emotional and mental problems (Career Discovery, 1997). A clinical psychologist basically prevents, evaluates, and treats mental and emotional disorders in individuals. "Disorders range from minor problems ...
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  • Cloning Is Ethically And Morally Wrong - 882 words
    Cloning Is Ethically And Morally Wrong Cloning is Ethically and Morally Wrong The question shakes us all to our very souls. For humans to consider the cloning of one another forces them all to question the very concepts of right and wrong that make them all human. The cloning of any species, whether they be human or non-human, is ethically and morally wrong. Scientists and ethicists alike have debated the implications of human and non-human cloning extensively since 1997 when scientists at the Roslin Institute in Scotland produced Dolly. No direct conclusions have been drawn, but compelling arguments state that cloning of both human and non-human species results in harmful physical and psych ...
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  • College Degrees - 1,213 words
    College Degrees INTRODUCTION Many adults who graduate from high school immediately enter careers that do not require a college degree. Indeed, the majority of the adult population of the United States of America does not have college degrees. And the lack of degree is not a stigma. Vocations usually do not require degrees. Certainly the many trade vocations in the building industry do not require college degrees, but instead either vocational training, on-the-job training, and combinations of both. The same applies to manufacturing, clerical, retail, and service positions. And one does not need a degree, college, nor indeed high school, to become President of the United States, or any other ...
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  • College Degrees - 1,133 words
    ... or DANTES, which administers its own exams, as well as the CLEP tests. Almost all military bases have an office of continuing education where preparatory studies are provided and tests administered. Information can be obtained from base information offices. Non- traditional colleges usually accept transcripts from DANTES. IV. COLLEGE COURSES Everyone lives near a regionally accredited college, either a four- year college, or a two-year community or junior college, and most colleges admit adults to credit courses, and issue transcripts that will be accepted by non-traditional colleges, if the courses meet the distribution requirements toward the degree. And for those who have previously t ...
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  • Confucius - 1,260 words
    Confucius The history of Chinese civilization spans thousands of years and encompasses countless ideas, beliefs, and societal and political doctrines. However, from a modern standpoint one distinct perspective prevails above the rest in the manner and degree it has influenced the development of China. For the previous 2,000 years the teachings of Confucius, and the systems of thought and behavior that have evolved from them, have had significant effects on Chinese thought, government institutions, literature and social customs. Confucianism has served a primary role as a social and moral philosophy and as practiced by many, especially in the educated upper classes, Confucianism had definite ...
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  • Crime And Punishment - 1,662 words
    Crime And Punishment From the beginning of time, crime has been evident in human existence, and from the first crime there has always been a punishment. "And it came to pass, when they were in a field, that Cain rose up against his brother, Able, and slew him" (Genesis 4:8). This for many people was seen as the first crime. This crime did not go unpunished. Cain was then ostracized from his colony and sent to wonder as a vagabond and a fugitive for his crime (Genesis 4:14). He was also branded with the mark of a murderer. Therefore, the presence of crime in human life is inevitable. Defined in Websters Dictionary, crime is, an act of violation against society and its laws. Punishment is the ...
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  • Crime And Punishment - 1,289 words
    Crime And Punishment Many great literary works emerge from a writer's experiences. Through The Crucible, Arthur Miller unleashes his fears and disdain towards the wrongful accusations of McCarthyism. Not only does Ernest Hemmingway present the horrors he witnessed in World War I in his novel, A Fair Well to Arms, he also addresses his disillusionment of war and that of the expatriates. Another writer who brings his experiences into the pages of a book is Fyodor Dostoyevsky. Faced with adversity and chronic financial problems, he lived as a struggling writer in St. Petersburg, a city stricken with poverty. Dostoyevsky's novel, Crime and Punishment, ingeniously illustrates the blatant destitut ...
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  • Dead Poets Society - 373 words
    Dead Poet's Society Dead Poets Society The film, Dead Poets Society, is a story of a English professor who instructs a group of eager boys in a highly accredited and traditional boys academy. Professor Keatings, played by Robin Williams, introduces his students into the world of poetry. Throughout the school year, the professor inspires the students to seize the day and make their lives extraordinary. A group of students gets swept away by their teachers enthusiastic spirit, and they decide to reorganize The Dead Poets Society, a select club which used to meet in a cave when the professor attended school, to experience inspiration through poetry. The inspirational impact he has on his studen ...
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  • Distributed Computing - 1,360 words
    Distributed Computing As the technology we use today increases in speed and usability, there are those that are happy with the fastest computer. But then there are those that either want or need to go faster than the fastest. The solution lies in and around the Internet, the solution has been rightfully termed "Distributed Computing." Put simply, distributed computing is the splitting of a task among multiple computers. Hence using the power of many computers that people already have, thus sparing the cost of buying a supercomputer of equal proportions, which in some cases is impossible. Distributed Computing isn't all that hard of a concept to grasp. The first thing that would be done when ...
    Related: computing, distributed, computer science, technology advances, sitting
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