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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: management techniques

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  • Active Euthenasia A Kantian Perspective - 1,259 words
    Active Euthenasia - A Kantian Perspective Matchmaker.com: Sign up now for a free trial. Date Smarter! Active Euthenasia - A Kantian Perspective Euthanasia is one of society's more widely, and hotly debated moral issues of our time. More directly, active euthanasia, which by definition, is; "Doing something, such as administering a lethal drug, or using other means that cause a person's death."1 Passive euthanasia, defined as; "Stopping (or not starting) some treatment, which allows a person to die, the person's condition causes his or her death,"2 seems not to be as debated, perhaps not as recognized, as it's counterpart. I have chosen to look more closely at the issue of active euthanasia, ...
    Related: active euthanasia, kantian, concise oxford dictionary, health care, personally
  • Air Traffic Strike - 4,375 words
    Air Traffic Strike The Pressures of PATCO: Strikes and Stress in the 1980s By Rebecca Pels -------------------------------------------------- ---------------------- Note on electronic format: you can access any citation by clicking on the note number. In order to leave citations and return to the main text of the document, press the Back key on your viewer. -------------------------------------------------- ---------------------- On August 3, 1981 almost 13,000 air traffic controllers went on strike after months of negotiations with the federal government. During the contract talks, Robert Poli, president of the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Association (PATCO), explained the union's th ...
    Related: strike, traffic, traffic control, traffic controllers, aviation safety
  • Americas Great Depression - 1,607 words
    America's Great Depression America's Great Depression by Chima Lonstone The Great Depression is probably one of the most misunderstood events in American history. It is routinely cited, as proof that unregulated capitalism is not the best in the world, and that only a massive welfare state, huge amounts of economic regulation, and other Interventions can save capitalism from itself. Among the many myths surrounding the Great Depression are that Herbert Hoover was a laissez faire president and that FDR brought us out of the depression. What caused the Great Depression? To get a handle on that, it's necessary to look at previous depressions and compare. The Great Depression was by no means the ...
    Related: americas, great depression, interest rate, minimum wage, clearing
  • Book Report On Leading The Revolution By Gary Hamel - 806 words
    Book Report on Leading the Revolution by Gary Hamel Leading the Revolution was written by Gary Hamel and published in September of 2000. Hamel writes a how to book on creating the new dynamic organization. His main theme is that old business strategies are not going to survive in what he calls the age of Revolution. In his premise to the book, he states that he will show the reader how to become a revolutionary in the business world. He completes his stated task by explaining the difference between contemporary strategy and revolutionary strategy, by explaining how a reader can begin to think revolutionary, and finally by explaining how a person can act revolutionary in their own company. Ha ...
    Related: book report, gary, business strategies, management techniques, contemporary
  • Childhood Education And Social Inequalities - 1,127 words
    ... g a mother. The parents who show this usually have children who speak less, have poorer cognitive and linguistic outcomes, are impulsive, aggressive, have social withdrawal, insecure attachments, and poor peer relationships. Maltreatment of children is another big risk-factor with significant bearing on the social class. Maltreatment is associated with aggression, and four times as many(about 20%) of maltreated children go on to become delinquent. The causes can be associated with biological psychological, and social bearings. There is no doubt that early maltreatment of children can affect their neurodevelopment as well as their behavior. If the parents have access to community resource ...
    Related: childhood development, childhood education, early childhood, social class, child behavior
  • Contents 1 Introduction 2 What Is Business Ethics 3 The 10 Benefits Of Business Ethics 4 Case Study On Nestle 41 The Impact O - 1,791 words
    Contents 1. Introduction 2. What is Business Ethics? 3. The 10 Benefits of Business Ethics 4. Case Study on Nestle 4.1. The Impact of Business Ethics on Nestle 4.2. Nestle's view on Business Ethics 4.3. The Implications of Business Ethics on Stakeholders 5. Conclusion Introduction Businesses have power through their ability to spend vast amounts of money. They have the ability to enhance or change situations that the common individual does not. As organisations affect many people, they have obligations to their employees, consumers, community and the world. They have a responsibility to conduct business in a way that is not harmful and which positively benefits as many people as possible and ...
    Related: business environment, business ethics, case study, ethics, nestle
  • Criteria For Heroes - 1,460 words
    Criteria for Heroes The ancient Greeks had strict criteria for individuals to follow if they were to be seen as heroes. Above all, a man needed to be a skilled warrior, but this was not the only requirement. To be a hero, a warrior had to respect authority, both governmental and religious. The Greeks gave heroes no room for pride. These men were to be modest, not only giving credit to their culture and the gods for any great deeds they had done, but also accepting everything that happened as Fate, not scenarios they had created for themselves. In other words, they did not make themselves what they were; rather, they had been predestined to become it. The final requirement of being a hero was ...
    Related: criteria, heroes, anger management, the iliad, humility
  • Culture Shock - 1,172 words
    Culture Shock Culture in ancient times was defined as "the sum total of the equipment of the human individual, which enables him to be attuned to his immediate environment on the historical past on the other". It reflects in effect what humans have added to Nature. It comprises the spiritual, material, intellectual and emotional features of a society and includes, in addition to the arts and letters, the value systems, traditions, modes of life and beliefs of the society. It also absorbs from other cultures and undergoes changes with time, sometimes beneficial, sometimes regressive. (Barlas, 15). Culture shock is a severe psychological reaction that results from adjusting to the realities of ...
    Related: culture shock, shock, potential impact, international business, adjusting
  • Fordism And Scientific Management - 1,966 words
    Fordism And Scientific Management FORDISM, SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT AND THE LESSONS FOR CONTEMPORARY ORGANISATIONS Fordism and Scientific Management are terms used to describe management that had application to practical situations with extremely dramatic effects. Fordism takes its name from the mass production units of Henry Ford, and is identified by an involved technical division of labour within companies and their production units. Other characteristics of Fordism include strong hierarchical control, with workers in a production line often restricted to the one single task, usually specialised and unskilled. Scientific management, on the other hand, "originated" through Fredrick Winslow Ta ...
    Related: management, management techniques, scientific management, scientific study, human cost
  • Handling Stress - 1,014 words
    Handling Stress # This essay is about handling the stress of University studies. We will be looking into many ideas and different peoples views on how to handle stress. I will also be giving my own opinions on how I think stress can be controlled or relieved. The first thing we must do is ask ourselves one very important question, what is stress? WHAT IS STRESS? According to an Australian born physician, Hans Selye (1979), stress is the nonspecific response of the body to any demand made upon it. The body responds in many ways. One is to the loss of blood and the other is to the lack of sleep. Both of these are nonspecific responses, however all demands made on the body evoke generalised, no ...
    Related: handling, manage stress, stress management, more effective, management training
  • Handling Stress - 1,014 words
    Handling Stress # This essay is about handling the stress of University studies. We will be looking into many ideas and different peoples views on how to handle stress. I will also be giving my own opinions on how I think stress can be controlled or relieved. The first thing we must do is ask ourselves one very important question, what is stress? WHAT IS STRESS? According to an Australian born physician, Hans Selye (1979), stress is the nonspecific response of the body to any demand made upon it. The body responds in many ways. One is to the loss of blood and the other is to the lack of sleep. Both of these are nonspecific responses, however all demands made on the body evoke generalised, no ...
    Related: handling, manage stress, stress management, health promotion, junior college
  • Handling Stress - 1,017 words
    Handling Stress Handling Stress This essay is about handling the stress of University studies. We will be looking into many ideas and different peoples views on how to handle stress. I will also be giving my own opinions on how I think stress can be controlled or relieved. The first thing we must do is ask ourselves one very important question, what is stress? WHAT IS STRESS? According to an Australian born physician, Hans Selye (1979), stress is the nonspecific response of the body to any demand made upon it. The body responds in many ways. One is to the loss of blood and the other is to the lack of sleep. Both of these are nonspecific responses, however all demands made on the body evoke g ...
    Related: handling, manage stress, stress management, more effective, college students
  • Handling Stress - 1,014 words
    Handling Stress # This essay is about handling the stress of University studies. We will be looking into many ideas and different peoples views on how to handle stress. I will also be giving my own opinions on how I think stress can be controlled or relieved. The first thing we must do is ask ourselves one very important question, what is stress? WHAT IS STRESS? According to an Australian born physician, Hans Selye (1979), stress is the nonspecific response of the body to any demand made upon it. The body responds in many ways. One is to the loss of blood and the other is to the lack of sleep. Both of these are nonspecific responses, however all demands made on the body evoke generalised, no ...
    Related: handling, manage stress, stress management, term paper, sympathetic nervous system
  • Japanese Management - 1,998 words
    ... le they are working. Job rotation is also a good training. Employee will learn from a different perspective in terms of a companys need. These transfers will bring a refresher to employees and they will be able to improve their skill. The future promotion is deepening on this transfer, therefore they will not refuse it. In figure 1, we can see the effectiveness of job rotation in Japanese firms. Effect of Job rotation, 1982 -------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------- It was effective: 65.8 A specific knowledge/skill was required 25.6 Knowledge/skills were broad 25. 4 Managerial ability was improved 14.8 It was not effective: 25.8 Transferre ...
    Related: japanese, japanese company, japanese culture, japanese society, management, management techniques, upper management
  • Job Stress - 1,512 words
    Job Stress The official working week is being reduced to 35 hours a week. In most countries in the world, it is limited to 45 hours a week. The trend during the last century seems to be less work, more play. Yet, what may be true for blue-collar workers or state employees - is not necessarily so for white-collar employees. It is not rare for these people - lawyers, accountants, consultants, managers, academics - to put in 80 hour weeks. This trend is so widespread and its social consequences so known that it acquired the unflattering nickname workaholism, a combination of the words "work" and "alcoholism". Family life is disrupted, intellectual horizons narrow, the consequences to the workah ...
    Related: job stress, industrial revolution, social structures, true meaning, monopoly
  • Managers And The Process Of Change - 1,228 words
    ... rder purposes o Catalyst o Cultivator o Harvester o Commitment builder o Steward o Appeal to higher-level vision o Enrichment o Evaluational knowing Management Skills and Knowledge The control environment was suited for much of the 20th century, but beginning in the early 1970's its effectiveness began to erode. Vaill (1998), explains, that today's environment is comparable to white water rafting. The techniques that worked then simply will not work now. In order to survive in the 21st century, companies will be forced by the ever-evolving marketplace to shift to a creativity/differentiated orientation. This poses a significant challenge for many managers. Most people in positions of lea ...
    Related: successful change, employee involvement, higher level, management techniques, enrichment
  • Stress And Illness - 1,077 words
    Stress And Illness The Effects of Stress on Physical Illness April 17, 2000 #38 Abstract Research has shown a connection between stress and physical illness. Furthermore, who becomes ill under pressure may be regulated by other factors such as personality type. The purpose of this project was to determine if there is a relationship between stress and illness. Another motive for this project was to investigate whether or not correlations between illness, personality type, and/or stress is evident. Twenty-one students in the Writing of Agriculture and Natural Resources class at the University of Florida were surveyed on their perceived level of stress and physical health. The questionnaire als ...
    Related: illness, managing stress, reduce stress, stress management, stress reduction
  • Supply Chain Management Developments - 2,389 words
    ... en Interest in supply chain systems has been the shortcomings of traditional enterprise resource planning (ERP). ERP systems are not constraint-based. They do not take into consideration where all the resources need to execute the plan are in place. Supply chain applications propose a schedule, highlight bottlenecks, and let users adjust due dates or resources until they find a satisfactory schedule. These plans can then be zapped into the transactional ERP system. The Race is On There now seems to be a race in the technology field amongst the industry giants to get a product to market. Supply chain management and planning software are still in their infancy. There are a lot of sunk cost ...
    Related: chain, chain management, global supply, management, management analysis, management techniques, supply chain
  • The Invisible Epidemic - 1,050 words
    The Invisible Epidemic c The rise of asthma in urban communities is beginning to reach epic proportions. It is a disease that is not limited to the United States, but is endemic to all developed nations and is especially prevalent in urban communities. The drastic rise in asthma and related pulmonary illnesses is surprising because benchmark studies have resulted in an as yet unknown understanding of the disease. All scientists agree, however, that this is a pathology whose etiology can be traced as an overt effect of a modern Western culture. The effects of asthma are wide reaching and can be studied from many viewpoints. From a societal perspective, sociologists and public health officials ...
    Related: epidemic, invisible, public health, blood cells, react
  • The Risk Management Of Asset And Liabilities By Developing Countries - 1,154 words
    ... in the foreign currency value of its revenues. In addition to the potential capital losses that a government may incur on its debt portfolio, its ability to access international markets to refinance its maturing debt is likely to be hindered. Taking the above mentioned issues into consideration it will be advantageous for the lender as well as the borrower, which often is a sovereign nation to be knowledgeable on the risks involved, and commitment by parties in order to understand their obligations, since both could end up as losers.On the other hand the O.E.C.D also believes that risks associated with a large net currency exposure and the existence of deep and liquid domestic capital m ...
    Related: asset, debt management, financial management, management, management techniques, rate risk, risk management
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