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  • Mahatma Gandhi - 1,225 words
    Mahatma Gandhi Mahatma Gandhi whose real name was Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, was born in 1869 at Porbandar in the state of Gujarat in India. His father's name was Karamchand Gandhi and his mother's name was Putlibai. He was the youngest in the family of one sister and three brothers. Both his parents were deeply religious and frequently visited temples and took their meals only after daily prayers. In school Gandhi was a mediocre student who was quite an introvert. He was even afraid to talk to any student in the class as he thought that they would poke fun at him. However, he always upheld his honesty and truthfulness. He believed in respecting his elders and was always 'blind to the fault ...
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  • Mahatma Gandhi - 461 words
    Mahatma Gandhi I am purely amazed by the astonishing personal revolution by which a simple inarticulate man transformed himself into the Mahatma, who ushered the British Empire out of India without even firing a shot. In the age of Empire and Military might he proved that the powerless had power and that force of arms would never prevail against force of spirit. Based on all this, Mahatma Gandhi surely deserved an award, which spoke of his efforts, his fight for freedom and justice and all his other contributions to this world. This award could be given to a few other people also who have been great reformers. It could be given to one who is a reformer, who has fought for the rights of the p ...
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  • Mahatma Gandhi - 1,416 words
    Mahatma Gandhi Throughout history most national heroes have been warriors, but Gandhi was a passive and peaceful preacher of morals, ethics, and beliefs. He was an outsider who ended British rule over India without striking a blow. Moreover, Gandhi was not skillful with any unusual artistic, scholarly, or scientific talents. He never earned a degree or received any special academic honors. He was never a candidate in an election or a member of government. Yet when he died, in 1948, practically the whole world mourned him. Einstein said in his tribute, "Gandhi demonstrated that a powerful human following can be assembled not only through the cunning game of the usual political maneuvers and t ...
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  • Mahatma Ghandi - 331 words
    Mahatma Ghandi Ghandi was indeed an important person in Asian history. He led the struggle for Indian independence from Britain, eventually achieved in 1947. Perhaps the most intriguing part of this was his method. Ghandi preached non violence, he once said "Non-violence is the greatest force at the disposal of mankind. It is mightier than the mightiest weapon of destruction devised by the ingenuity of man." This is the quality that makes him a unique and important figure in Asian development. Mohandas K. Ghandi was born in 1869 to Hindu parents in Western India. He married Kasturbai Makanji at the age of 13. His family then sent him to London to study law, and in 1891 he was called to the b ...
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  • Thomas Merton And Mahatma Gandhi - 1,372 words
    Thomas Merton and Mahatma Gandhi Thomas Merton and Mahatma Gandhi both speak of God in a personal way. They both speak of God as truth. Famous Thomas Merton, Trappist American monk, was a traditional Christian. Born in France in 1915 and died in Asia in 1968 Merton was greatly influenced by the complexities of the twentieth century. His writings served as a personal may in his search for God.. He pursued the ascending path towards the eternal kingdom of truth, towards heaven, while leaving the world of shadowy existence behind. Truth would be a passion of his life. He also took it upon himself to speak on behalf of the disenfranchised of the word. Thomas Merton was a dynamic, modern man who ...
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  • Thomas Merton And Mahatma Gandhi - 1,266 words
    ... id, even though he had a choice, because of this Gandhi became a trusted leader. He became the international symbol of free India. He believed wholeheartedly that if he was to serve society, he had to give up his greed for money, hankering pleasures and lead a life of utter simplicity and self-control and teach others by his own example. Refusing earthly possessions, he wore a loincloth and shawl like that of the lowliest Indians and survived on vegetables, fruit juices, and goats milk. He lived a spiritual and abstemious life of prayer, fasting and mediation. He was quite sensitive to the charms of nature. He wanted to understand nature as an expression of God and tried to see life in e ...
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  • Truth And Nonviolence Will Never Be Destroyed Those Words Spoken By Mahatma Gandhi Describe The True Essence Of His Characte - 898 words
    " Truth and nonviolence will never be destroyed" those words spoken by Mahatma Gandhi describe the true essence of his character. He was a man who unlike others decided to use nonviolence as a means of getting what he wanted. His different approach is what ultimately led to his rising popularity and strong success. Not only did Gandhi almost single-handedly free India and its five hundred million people from their long subjection to the British Empire, but he did so without raising an army, without firing a gun or taking a hostage, and without ever holding a political office. Mohandas Karamch and Gandhi was born on October 2, 1869, in Porbandar, near Bombay. Gandhi's family belonged to the m ...
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  • Ahmedabad Satyagraha - 1,532 words
    Ahmedabad Satyagraha Ahmedabad Satyagraha Sharon Mail Kanichy History 470 March 31, 1998 DEFINITIONS Ahimsa Usually translated as non-violence. Action based on the refusal to do harm. Himsa means to wish to kill. A in front of himsa negates the word, therefore making it the renunciation of the will to kill or damage. Tapasya Self-suffering. Suffering injury in ones own person. Satya Truth which implies love and firmness. Combined with Agraha is the title of the Indian movement Satyagraha, a force that is born of Truth and Love or non-violence. Sarvodaya Uplift of all. The ideal society in which Gandhi worked towards. This was the primary objective of the satyagraha and the Gandhian movement. ...
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  • Civil Rights And Disobedience - 1,630 words
    Civil Rights And Disobedience By acting civil but disobedient you are able to protest things you dont think are fair, non-violently. Henry David Thoreau is one of the most important literary figures of the nineteenth century. Thoreaus essay "Civil Disobedience," which was written as a speech, has been used by many great thinkers such as Martin Luther King Jr. and Mahatma Ghandi as a map to fight against injustice. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was a pastor that headed the Civil Rights movement. He was a gifted speaker and a powerful writer whose philosophy was non-violent but direct action. Dr.Kings strategy was to have sit-ins, boycotts, and marches. Dr. Kings "Letter from Birmingham Jail" was ...
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  • Class V Caste System - 1,311 words
    Class V. Caste System A Class vs. a Caste System In any country's history, a high stage of social development is reached only when the main social divisions are formed. "The caste system penetrates the Hindu society to a level unknown elsewhere. It plays some part in other civilizations but in India it has invaded the whole. It is in this sense that we may speak of the caste system as a phenomenon peculiar to India" (Pocock 27). The class system of the United States and the caste system of India share common characteristics but, at the same time, they different in many ways. A caste system rigidly restricted occupationally, socially, members may not marry outside the caste. Caste system deva ...
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  • Comparative Politics - 2,347 words
    Comparative Politics Comparative Politics, typically defined as the study of the internal politics of nations other than our own, is a diverse and complex field. There is no one central tendency or approach which dominates this area of inquiry within political science: various theories, concepts, issues and methodologies are evident in the field. While it is recognized that no simple classification can be made of the literature, we are encouraged to be aware of contrasting approaches, and to engage in constructively critical ,thinking about the field. For the purposes of study, there should first be general familiarity with the history and evolution of the field. This would comprise knowledg ...
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  • Concept Of Karma - 1,650 words
    Concept Of Karma MIDTERM EXAMINATION What is the relation, if any, of the concept of varna to the concept of karma? Two major concepts of the Hindu religion are varna and karma. While at first glance it may not appear that they are related, they in fact do have a direct correlation. The combination of the caste system and the concept of karma have an important part in explaining the consequences of life for the Hindu followers. Varna refers to the caste system. The caste system was divided into four categories. The Brahmins, the Kshatriyas, the Vaisyas, and the Shudras. There were also the untouchables. The Brahmins were the priests. The leaders were the Kshatriyas. The Vaisyas were the comm ...
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  • Evil Problem - 1,841 words
    Evil Problem "No one who conjures up the most evil of those half-tamed demons that inhabit the human breast and seeks to wrestle with them can expect to come through the struggle unscathed." -Dora (Complete Psychological Works) There exists an all poweful force in this universe that makes man fall into an eternal abyss of illusion and hell. It is called Maya (Cosmic Illusion) by the Vedanta and"evil" by the English It wounds the opponent always, many times almost fatally. It is the most ferocious, wild, and swinish beast in existence. Sometimes a mere glance at it can provoke it to attack. There is only weapon that can kill this "evil", that can wipe it away once and for all, that can triump ...
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  • Gandhi - 1,537 words
    Gandhi Gandhi Gandhi, lived from 1869-1948 and was also known as Mahatma Gandhi, was born in Porbandar, in the modern state of Gujarat, on October 2, 1869, into a Hindu family, Both his father and grandfather having been prime ministers of two adjacent and tiny states. After a modest career at school, he went to London in 1888 to train as a lawyer, leaving behind his young wife, whom he had married when she was in her teens. In London, Gandhi encountered theosophists, vegetarians, and others who were disenchanted not only with industrialism, but with the legacy of Enlightenment thought. They themselves represented the fringe elements of English society. Gandhi was powerfully attracted to the ...
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  • Gandhi - 1,105 words
    Gandhi Mahatma Gandhi was born on October 2 1869 in Porbandar India. He grew up in a very wealthy and spiritual home. His father got very ill while Gandhi was a young child, which put him through a lot of stress. The way he got rid of the stress was by taking long walks in the night. Which sooner or later turned into smoking, shoplifting, and even eating meat. Which Gandhi was a vegetarian. After Gandhi completed his early education, he went to London to study in a university. He was trying to become a lawyer. After he was through with school, he moved back to India. Shortly after, an Indian firm wanted him to travel to South Africa. When he arrived, he realized white people do not welcome I ...
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  • Gandhi And The Western Mind - 1,262 words
    Gandhi And The Western Mind Mary Reynolds November 17, 2000 History 3840 Arthur K. Scott Gandhi, Satyagraha, and the Western Mind There is much that can be said about such a great leader like Gandhi. He had many skills that were needed to make a difference in the world. Perhaps the most important quality that he possessed was the attributes of knowledge and common sense. These attributes made him a very levelheaded man who knew how to treat his opponent with respect while stating the issue at hand. Gandhi achieved many accomplishments throughout his life. Overall, the most significant was that one man could make a difference within his own country that received worldwide recognition. One of ...
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  • Gandhi Teachings - 1,287 words
    Gandhi Teachings From Gandhi, to Gandhiji, to Mahatma and Bapu, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi has traveled the distance from being the national hero to a legend. Gandhi, in life, was much more. Gandhi was a thinker, a philosopher, and also a statesman. He believed he could lead only if he was a worthy leader. To be a worthy leader he had to be morally strong. As he used to say, "A liar could not teach his pupils to speak the truth, a coward can not train young men to be brave." So to be morally strong, he believed one has to be strong in spirit. To be strong in spirit, one must live in accordance with one's beliefs, by a strict code of conduct. With such an all-encompassing vision of life, ever ...
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  • Gandhi Teachings - 1,302 words
    ... , Gandhi proclaimed an organized campaign of resistance. Indians in public office resigned, government agencies such as courts of law were boycotted, and Indian children were withdrawn from government schools. Through India, squatting Indians who refused to rise even when beaten by police blocked streets. Gandhi was arrested, but the British were soon forced to release him. Economic independence for India, involving the complete boycott of British goods, was made a corollary of Gandhi's movement. The economic aspects of the movement were significant, for the exploitation of Indian villagers by British industrialists had resulted in extreme poverty in the country and the virtual destructi ...
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  • Ghandi - 1,488 words
    Ghandi Mahatma Gandhi Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was born in Porbandar, India, on October 2, 1869. Although his father was a chief minister for the maharaja of Porbandar, the family came from the traditional caste of grocers (the name Gandhi means grocer). His mother's religion was Jainism, a Hindu religion which ideas of nonviolence and vegetarianism are very important. Gandhi said that he was most influenced by his mother, whose life was an endless chain of fasts and vows. When, in the company of boyhood friends, he secretly smoked, ate meat, told lies, or wore Western clothing, he had an intense feeling of guilt. These feelings forced him to make resolutions about his moral behaviour that ...
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  • Government In India, Today - 1,520 words
    ... sh instituted a program of gradual power-sharing, but Congress leaders, frustrated by the slow pace, organized the Quit India movement during World War II. The desire of the Congress to maintain a united front against Britain was frustrated, however, by the Muslim League, which demanded the partition of India into separate Hindu and Muslim states. During World War I Indian troops served the British loyally, but nationalist agitation increased afterward. The British Parliament passed a reform act in 1919, providing for provincial councils of Indians with some powers of supervision over agriculture, education, and public health. Far from satisfied, the extreme nationalists, led by Mohandas ...
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