Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: ludwig

  • 65 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>
  • Ludwig Van Beethoven - 959 words
    Ludwig Van Beethoven Beethoven For many people, Ludwig Van Beethoven is considered the greatest composer who ever lived and is the highest level of musical geniuses. His compositions are the expression of one of the most powerful musical personalities of all time which he exceeded above average in both areas of Classical and Romantic labeling. Beethoven was born in Bonn, Germany, December 16, 1770, and was baptized on December 17. His father, Johann, was a singer employed by the Elector of Cologne in Bonn. Johann married Maria Magdalena Laym, a cook's daughter. Together they had seven children of which three sons survived, Beethoven was the oldest (Collier's Encyclopedia, Beethoven). When Jo ...
    Related: beethoven, ludwig, ludwig van beethoven, piano concerto, attempted suicide
  • Ludwig Van Beethoven - 568 words
    Ludwig Van Beethoven BEETHOVEN 1770-1827 Life of Beethoven I. Education in general and in music Beethoven came from a musical family, and his early musical training was under his father's guidance. His father taught him piano and violin. His general education was not continued beyond the elementary school. He was practically illiterate in math. II. Self assertion As a youth of 19, in 1789, Beethoven took legal steps to have himself placed at the head of his family. He petitioned for half his father's salary to support his brothers. This act of self-assertion is an indication of his character. III. Studies with Haydn A. The first contact On one of Haydn's trips to London, he met the young Bee ...
    Related: beethoven, ludwig, ludwig van beethoven, general education, elementary school
  • Ludwig Van Beethoven Was Born In Bonn, Germany He Studied In Vienna Under Mozart And Hayden In Vienna He First Made His Reput - 322 words
    Ludwig van Beethoven was born in Bonn, Germany. He studied in Vienna under Mozart and Hayden. In Vienna he first made his reputation as a pianist and teacher, and he became famous quickly. At this time he composed many of his most popular works such as the Fifth symphony, the Emperor Concerto, the Eroica and Pastoral symphonies, and his only opera Fidelio. Beethoven developed a completely original style of music, reflecting his sufferings and joys. His work forms a peak in the development of tonal music and is one of the most important developments in the history of music. Before his time, composers wrote works for religious services, and to entertain people. But people listened to Beethoven ...
    Related: beethoven, germany, hayden, ludwig, ludwig van beethoven, mozart, vienna
  • Ludwig Von Beethoven - 557 words
    Ludwig von Beethoven One of the greatest musical geniuses of all time didnt even know his own birthday. Ludwig von Beethoven was born second in his family, behind Ludwig Maria, his older brother, who died very young. This loss may still have stung their parents. Their pain could have overshadowed the second Ludwigs own early childhood. The brothers shared a name, Ludwig, which probably added to his confusion. A common mistake is the claim that Beethoven was born on December 17, 1770. This is actually the date of his baptism, which suggests that he may have been born on December 16, but the details are unknown. Although his birthday is unknown, we do know that he was born in Bonn, Germany. Mi ...
    Related: beethoven, ludwig, romantic period, hearing loss, dignity
  • The Rise Of Ludwig Van Beethoven Into The Ranks Of Historys Greatest Composers Was Parallelled By And In Some Ways A Conseque - 1,456 words
    The rise of Ludwig van Beethoven into the ranks of history's greatest composers was parallelled by and in some ways a consequence of his own personal tragedy and despair. Beginning in the late 1790's, the increasing buzzing and humming in his ears sent Beethoven into a panic, searching for a cure from doctor to doctor. By October 1802 he had written the Heiligenstadt Testament confessing the certainty of his growing deafness, his consequent despair, and suicidal considerations. Yet, despite the personal tragedy caused by the "infirmity in the one sense which ought to be more perfect in [him] than in others, a sense which [he] once possessed in the highest perfection, a perfection such as few ...
    Related: beethoven, ludwig, ludwig van beethoven, music history, string quartet
  • Albert Eienstein - 426 words
    Albert Eienstein ALBERT EINSTEIN The German-American physicist Albert EinsteiN, contributed more than any other scientist to the 20th-century . Born in the town of Ulm, Germany, Mar. 14, 1879, HE then later died in Princeton, N.J., Apr. 18, 1955. In the wake of World War I, Einstein's theories, especially his theory of relativity, seemed to many people to point to a pure quality of human thought, one far removed from the war and its aftermath. Seldom has a scientist received such public attention for having the ability for learning thet he had. in 1905, Einstein examined the phenomenon discovered by Max Planck, according to which electromagnetic energy seemed to be emitted from radiating obj ...
    Related: albert, albert einstein, quantum mechanics, world war i, germany
  • Albert Einstien - 1,742 words
    Albert Einstien Men and Women of Science Albert Einstein Early Life Einstein was born in Ulm, Germany on Mar. 14, 1879. Einstein's parents, who were non observant Jews, moved from Ulm to Munich, Germany when Einstein was an infant. The family business was the manufacture of electrical parts. When the business failed, in 1894, the family moved to Milan, Italy. At this time Einstein decided officially to end his German citizenship. Within a year, still without having completed secondary school, Einstein failed an examination that would have allowed him to pursue a course of study leading to a diploma as an electrical engineer at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. He spent the next year ...
    Related: albert, albert einstein, men and women, theoretical physics, slightly
  • Beethoven - 753 words
    Beethoven BEETHOVEN, Ludwig van (1770-1827) The composer of some of the most influential pieces of music ever written, Ludwig van Beethoven created a bridge between the 18th-century classical period and the new beginnings of Romanticism. His greatest breakthroughs in composition came in his instrumental work, including his symphonies. Unlike his predecessor Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, for whom writing music seemed to come easily, Beethoven always struggled to perfect his work. Ludwig van Beethoven was born in Bonn, Germany, and was baptized on Dec. 17, 1770. (There is no record of his birth date.) His father and grandfather worked as court musicians in Bonn. Ludwig's father, a singer, gave him ...
    Related: beethoven, ludwig van beethoven, joseph haydn, antonio salieri, scherzo
  • Beethoven - 652 words
    Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven was, and remains today, a Legend in the history of classical music. His influence on music is unequalled. Perhaps no other composer in history wrote music of such exhilarating power. No other composer did so against the trials and hardships that he had went through. He beat the odds to become who he was. A Beethoven was born in Bonn in 1770. His father, a music enthusiast, dreamed of molding his son into the next Mozart. Beethoven never showed the same characteristics that Mozart had shown when he was young, but was unusually talented, learning the piano, organ and violin at an early age. At 14, he was already proficient enough on the organ to receive a profess ...
    Related: beethoven, ludwig van beethoven, classical music, teaching methods, frustrated
  • Beethoven - 1,053 words
    Beethoven Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven overcame many obstacles throughout his life (1770-1827). By expanding the style of his influences, he accomplished musical tasks before possible. His influences were Neefe, Mozart, and Bach. In comparison to other composers, such as Bach and Mozart, Beethoven produced a relatively small number of symphonies. However, his nine symphonies contained more emotion and ingenuity than all other artists combined. In fact, the Ninth Symphony Orchestra is Beethovens most renowned work, as well as the greatest accomplishment in music history. Beethoven possessed an enormous musical mind, and proved himself to be the most influential composer of all time. Beethov ...
    Related: beethoven, ludwig van beethoven, dysfunctional family, music history, composing
  • Beethoven - 1,553 words
    Beethoven There resounds a proverbial question, If a tree falls in the woods and no one is there to hear, does it make a sound as it falls? Capricious as this query may appear I have had occasion to entertain just such a notion when, as a youth, I found an exploratory journey down a deep woods path abruptly halted by the greeting of an enormous fallen tree. The colossal obstacle lay across my path and presented itself a motionless, silent guardian that protected that which lay beyond from my further intrusion. What a monumental disturbance must have been witnessed by the forest as this giant came crashing down! I wondered how the tree came to be there in the first place or what of the countl ...
    Related: beethoven, ludwig van beethoven, last time, lasting effects, harmony
  • Beethoven - 479 words
    Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven was a German composer who is considered to be one of the greatest musicians of all time. He was born in Bonn. Beethovens fathers harsh discipline and alcoholism made his childhood and adolescence difficult. After his mothers death, at the age of 18, he placed himself at the head of the family, taking responsibility for his two younger brothers, both of whom followed him when he later moved to Vienna, Austria. In Bonn, Beethovens most important composition teacher was German composer Christian Gottlob Neefe, with whom he studied during the 1780s. Neefe mostly used the music of German composer Johann Sebastian Bach in his instruction. He later encouraged his stud ...
    Related: beethoven, ludwig van beethoven, amadeus mozart, classical music, humor
  • Capitalism: On Our Side - 668 words
    Capitalism: On Our Side? In the twenty-first century efforts need to be made to enhance the benefits of capitalism. This system has been able to improve the lives of many Americans. Critics however, point out that the improvements have come at a high cost. Specifically, they point to the amount of damage done to the environment. Although capitalism has raised the standard of living, because of the damage done to the environment capitalism is a wasteful system. Throughout history capitalism has raised the standard of living for many individuals. As former University of Vienna economics professor Ludwig von Mises says, "Modern capitalism is essentially mass production for the needs of the mass ...
    Related: standard of living, mass production, energy consumption, vienna, howard
  • Careers And Colleges - 1,660 words
    Careers And Colleges Research Project: Careers and Colleges It is difficult for first time job hunters to have realistic ideas about how to profit from their skills. This is why it is important to investigate what career you may be interested in and what colleges will enable you to excell in that career. The profession that I am interested into going into is an elementary school teacher. Fordham University and New York University are two colleges that offer excellent elementary education programs. Throughout this report I will be discussing information related to the career as well as information dealing with the colleges. Career: Elementary School Teacher Work Description School teachers at ...
    Related: careers, social workers, early years, national survey, administrative
  • Classical Music - 606 words
    Classical Music Classical Music, popular term for the Western tradition of art music that began in Europe in the Middle Ages and continues today. It includes symphonies, chamber music, opera, and other serious, artistic music. More narrowly, the "classical" style refers to the work of the Viennese classical school, a group of 18th-century composers that includes Franz Joseph Haydn, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, and Ludwig van Beethoven, which is the epitome of what is called classical music. Choral Music, music sung by a group of people, using two or more singers to perform each musical line. The term part-song is used for vocal music having one singer for each part. Choral music is written for c ...
    Related: african music, chamber music, classical, classical music, classical school, music
  • Comparative Sociology - 2,076 words
    ... heir work. In fact many would consider people like Nietzsche, and Ludwig Wittgenstein, precursors to postmodern theory. So, we get to the big question, what makes a theory postmodern? This is a tough question and one that really shouldnt be answered in the limited space available in this paper.. But, I am going to attempt to do it anyway. The quickest answer is that postmodern theories/theorists are those that are labeled by modernists. Most of the people that we associate closely with postmodern theory, in Sociology, would reject the label for themselves, including Michel Foucault, Jean-Francois Lyotard, and Baudrillard. Modernists are the ones who assign the labels. However, there must ...
    Related: comparative, sociology, modern literature, consumer society, movies
  • Construction And Playing - 934 words
    Construction and Playing The main parts of the violin are the front, also called the belly, top, or soundboard, usually made of well-seasoned spruce; the back, usually made of well-seasoned maple; and the ribs, neck, fingerboard, pegbox, scroll, bridge, tailpiece, and f-holes, or soundholes (see illustration). The front, back, and ribs are joined together to form a hollow sound box. The sound box contains the sound post, a thin, dowel-like stick of wood wedged inside underneath the right side of the bridge and connecting the front and back of the violin; and the bass-bar, a long strip of wood glued to the inside of the front under the left side of the bridge. The sound post and bass-bar are ...
    Related: construction, king louis, johann sebastian bach, early music, ensemble
  • Copyright And Patent Fraud - 1,440 words
    Copyright and Patent Fraud by David Lee Roth 12th hon. Government Mr. Pibb January 5, 1998 Roth 1 Today, more than ever before, products, goods, and services are being provided by businesses of all variations. Fewer and fewer people today are self-sufficient. Practically no one today makes his or her own clothes, and some people do not even prepare their own meals. Today's business world and modern day technology make it possible for people to obtain almost anything and everything they need or want, provided they have the money to buy it. There are gardening, music, painting, moving, clothing, and countless other businesses all around the world. Undoubtedly, there is a business for practical ...
    Related: copyright, fraud, patent, organized crime, personal care
  • Copyright And Patent Fraud - 1,429 words
    ... became involved in this lawsuit with a motorcycle parts and repair shop called the Hog Farm in San Jose, California, in 1991. The Hog Farm owners argued that a hog referred to any large motorcycle. In this case, Harley-Davidson filed for a trademark of the nickname hog, and was able to win the case. (Fritz 30) An article in the Los Angeles Times reports that on July 5th, 1995, Federal agents raided a stuffy yellow warehouse in downtown Los Angeles, where twelve men were cheating the Chanel Clothing Company of large profits. These few men make money by copying Chanel's crossed C logo and selling the fake product with a 500-per cent markup. (Simon A1) Most counterfeiting products tend to ...
    Related: copyright, copyright infringement, fraud, patent, patent laws, patent office, united states patent
  • Crying Of Lot 49 - 1,735 words
    Crying of Lot 49 The philosophy behind all Pynchon novels lies in the synthesis of philosophers and modern physicists. Ludwig Wittgenstein viewed the world as a "totality of facts, not of things."1 This idea can be combined with a physicist's view of the world as a closed system that tends towards chaos. Pynchon asserts that the measure of the world is its entropy.2 He extends this metaphor to his fictional world. He envelops the reader, through various means, within the system of The Crying of Lot 49. Pynchon designed The Crying of Lot 49 so that there would be two levels of observation: that of the characters such as our own Oedipa Maas, whose world is limited to the text, and that of the ...
    Related: crying, literary techniques, university press, city university, technique
  • 65 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>