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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: louise

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  • Fleur By Louise Endrich - 1,180 words
    Fleur By Louise Endrich Latina Blacknall "Fleur" a story written by Louise Endrich is a tale about a young Chippewa Indian woman who is feared by all the people that live on her reservation, Argus. They believed that she has been cursed by the water monster of Lake Turcot who seeks her life for his own. Her general lifestyle is an awe to them because she lives outside of traditional ways. She stirs things up with her uncanny luck and the circumstances that surround her. I believe this is a good story because I like the way that Fleur did things in her own way, she never let the people dictate her life. The story begins with Fleur being rescued from Lake Turcot after her boat capsizes and she ...
    Related: fleur, louise, indian woman, happy life, irony
  • In The Short Stories The Leap By Louise Erdrich, And The Mother Who Never Was By Lisa K Buchanan, Both Of The Main Characters - 680 words
    In the short stories The Leap by Louise Erdrich, and The Mother Who Never Was by Lisa K. Buchanan, both of the main characters undergo a dynamic change. In one story the mothers change is that she is regretting giving away her daughter. In the second story the change would be how the mother would save her daughter. In the story The Mother Who Never Was by Buchanan, Anna, the mother, gave her daughter, Kathleen, up for adoption. Anna was about eighteen years of age. In this story the reader could often see in their mind, the pain that Anna is going through. We know that Anna is in pain because she says, I should be proud to have provided a childless couple with the gift of a daughter. But I f ...
    Related: leap, lisa, louise, louise erdrich, young girl
  • 65279 The Life And Works Of James Weldon Johnson - 1,420 words
    THE LIFE AND WORKS OF JAMES WELDON JOHNSON James Weldon Johnson was a writer, diplomat, professor, and editor,who also described himself as a man of letters and a civil rights leader. Even though, he is no longer living, James Weldon Johnson has left much abouthis contributions to African American literature. Johnson was born June 17,1871 in Jacksonville, Florida to James and Helen Louise (Dallied) Johnson. Johnsons father, James Johnson, was born a freeman and was of mixed ancestry. He was a headwaiter in St. James Hotel. Mr. Johnson taughthis son how to speak Spanish as a young boy. Johnsons mother, Helen Johnson, was born a free woman in the West Indies. Mrs. Helen was awoman of French an ...
    Related: james weldon johnson, johnson, weldon, weldon johnson, works cited
  • African American Community - 3,040 words
    ... stood that his name would not appear in the program credits or advertising. For twenty weeks, the Mahalia Jackson Show ran on television for a half-hour each episode. Beginning in September 1954, the show did not last very long. Mahalias show featured her singing traditional gospels and spirituals with a few miscellaneous songs but the show was missing a major component. (2) The show was in need of a sponsor and began to go out of business. The show went from thirty minutes airtime to ten minutes and eventually ended in February 1955. This was not the end of Mahalia's television appearances however. The TV station, WBBM-TV of Chicago asked Mahalia to be a guest on their program, "In Town ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american community, race relations
  • After The Fall - 428 words
    After The Fall After the Fall Arthur Miller has written many great plays in his life, such as A View from the Bridge ,Death of a Salesman ,The Misfits, The Crucible, and After the Fall. Out of all his plays it is said that After the Fall is the darkest plays he has written. I believe that this is a true statement, and that the reasons this is his darkest play is because it deals with his inner feelings on thing that he had to deal with in his life. The certain aspects that he touched in this play are his marriage with Marilyn Monroe , who was a great actress in her time. Marilyn is portrayed though the character Maggie who is a very innocent girl who, like Marilyn, was looked at mainly as a ...
    Related: main character, marilyn monroe, the crucible, brush, maggie
  • Alcohol Related Deaths - 1,122 words
    ... " which includes:  Low red meat  Low lard or butter, higher olive oil  High in fish  High in cheese, low in whole milk  High in breads, fruits, and vegetables  Light to moderate wine drinking Horvath says other studies have shown that wine drinkers may simply be more concerned about their health, as compared to non-drinkers, beer drinkers, or hard liquor drinkers. Some studies have shown wine drinkers tend to eat less fat, and more fruits, vegetables, and fish. This would coincide with the Mediterranean Diet. So why not simply drink more grape, or other dark fruit juices? Horvaths report said this would be beneficial, however other reports ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol consumption, southern france, heart association, saving
  • Alexander Dumas - 309 words
    Alexander Dumas Alexander Dumas was a major playwright who helped to revolutionize French drama and theater. He was one of the best historical novelists, publishing more than two hundred novels. He was born on July twenty fourth, mille eighteen in the french town of Villers-Cotterets. His father was a general in Napoleon's army. His mother, Marie-Louise-Elizabeth was an innkeeper. His father died when he was four years old and his mother was not able to provide him with much education. As a young man, Alexandre Dumas worked as a clerc and moved to Paris. After seeing one of Shakesphere's plays, Hamlet, he had found the direction that he needed to go. The play had inspired him to become a pla ...
    Related: alexander, alexandre dumas, dumas, henry iii, three musketeers
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 1,146 words
    ... is recommended if the patient is to be completely cured. Many differences in symptoms are apparent between anorectics and bulimics. Anorexia nervosa patients usually are not obese before onset of their illness. Typically, they are good students who become socially withdrawn before becoming ill and often come from families who fit the anorexia prototype. Bulimics, on the other hand, usually are extroverted before their illness, are inclined to be overweight, have voracious appetites and have episodes of binge eating. Anorexia patients often have a better chance of returning to normal weight because their eating patterns, unlike those of bulimics, have been altered for a relatively shorter ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, nervosa, medical school, genetic basis
  • Applied Nostalgia - 2,252 words
    ... an apocalypse not. The 1950s and the 1990s are utterly and completely different. The 1950s was a post-war time, where utterly irreproducible affects kept mom at home. The 1990s is a technology laden information society, where media pries into corners and brings problems into greater light including violence, rape, birth control, and AIDS. The amount of nuclear families decreased (Two 1), yet the cause for the dissolve of the family outweighs the difficulties, the equalization of women in the work force. No longer do mothers rely on the male's income, they can survive on their own. Their ties of help flutter free and the American women becomes free since the American ideals put forth in ...
    Related: sexual education, single parent, employee loyalty, educating, guide
  • Arthur Miller And Tennessee Williams, Including A Streetcar Named Desire - 4,340 words
    Arthur Miller and Tennessee Williams, including A Streetcar Named Desire (1947, film, 1951) and Death of a Salesman (1949). He directed the Academy Award-winning films Gentleman's Agreement (1947) and On The Waterfront (1954), as well as East of Eden (1955), A Face in the Crowd (1957), Splendor in the Grass (1961), and The Last Tycoon (1976). His two autobiographical novels, America, America (1962) and The Arrangement (1967), were turned into films in 1963 and 1968. Bibliography: Koszarski, Richard, Hollywood Directors, 1941-1976 (1977). Jolson, Al -------------------------------- (johl'-suhn) The singer Al Jolson, b. Asa Yoelson in Lithuania, c.1886, d. Oct. 23, 1950, immigrated with his fa ...
    Related: arthur, arthur miller, miller, named desire, streetcar, streetcar named, streetcar named desire
  • Arts Of The Contact Zone By Pratt - 1,104 words
    Arts Of The Contact Zone By Pratt In "Arts of the Contact Zone," Mary Louise Pratt introduces a term very unfamiliar to many people. This term, autoethnography, means the way in which subordinate peoples present themselves in ways that their dominants have represented them. Therefore, autoethnography is not self-representation, but a collaboration of mixed ideas and values form both the dominant and subordinate cultures. They are meant to address the speaker's own community as well as the conqueror's. Pratt provides many examples of autoethnography throughout her piece, including two texts by Guaman Poma and her son, Manuel. Although very different in setting, ideas, and time periods, they a ...
    Related: arts, pratt, zone, the intended, grammar school
  • Bailey White - 1,090 words
    ... kup truck into town every day to man campaign headquarters, and she spent hours studying voter registration lists and calling on the phone to urge people to vote. She volunteered for everything" (Mama, 139-140). Mama also taught Luther, whose jam caused Bailey to rush over to the sink and wash her mouth out, the fundamentals of cooking, beginning with "Jams and Jellies," moving on to "Pickles and Preserves," then to "Biscuits and Pastry," and finally "Sauces, Marinades, Shellfish, and Game.... Soufflйs.... Desserts" (Mama, 151-155). Bailey took time to listen to old Mrs. Bierce with the wandering eye, and to visit Mrs. Helgert, tolerating her frequent interjections of "Hot? Honey! ...
    Related: bailey, wild turkey, modern society, cell phones, wandering
  • Biography Malcolm X - 1,023 words
    Biography Malcolm X Malcolm X The name Malcolm X still stirs emotions of fear and hatred in many Americans. When he was murdered in the Ballroom in Harlem on February 21, 1965, he was world-famous as the angriest black man in America. This is true because unlike Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X advocated freedom for blacks by any means necessary. For him, even the use of violence was a viable solution to fight racial discrimination. Because of such views some people still associate Malcolm X with the Black Panther movement of the sixties which they believe was a radical and violent organization. But portraying Malcolm X simply as a violent black activist fails to represent the whole picture ...
    Related: biography, malcolm, malcolm x, racial discrimination, junior high school
  • Bookreport - 1,222 words
    BOOKREPORT by Maximilian Schreder Malcolm X The Autobiography as told to Alex Haley Introduction When Malcolm X was murdered in the Audubon Ballroom in Harlem on February 21, 1965, he was world-famous as the angriest black man in America. By that time he had completed his autobiography, so we have now the opportunity to get information of this both hated and loved Afro-American leaders life at first hand. The book The Autobiography of Malcolm X, which he wrote with the assistance of Alex Haley, was first published in 1965. The Two Authors Malcolm X did not write his autobiography on his own, but he told his life to the journalist and novelist Alex Haley. Haley had already interviewed Malcolm ...
    Related: afro american, politics and religion, american struggle, desperate, joining
  • Captivity By Erdrich - 982 words
    Captivity By Erdrich Louise Erdrich, the author of the famous poem titled Captivity, tells a story about a married mother who has been held captive by a tribe of Indians. The poem uses a wide variety of literary elements such as sympathy, guilt, submissiveness, and tentativeness. The two main themes of this first person, six-stanza poem, are love and fear. Erdrich also uses tricksters, which are supernatural characters found in the folklores of various primitive peoples. They often function as culture heroes who are given acts of sly deception. In this poem, the narrators captor takes on the role of a trickster. In most of Erdrichs writings, she uses multiple characters as tricksters and thi ...
    Related: captivity, erdrich, louise erdrich, native american, first person
  • Changes Of Time: The Stereotypical Images Of Blacks On Television - 1,810 words
    Changes of Time: The Stereotypical Images of Blacks on Television Ever since television began in 1939, African Americans have been portrayed as maids, servants or clowns. These negative perceptions started to appear in sitcoms such as in Amos and Andy, who were the stereotypical backs who never took things seriously. All those views changed during the 1970s when black sitcoms were becoming more reality based. Although blacks have been, and often still, portrayed in a negative way on TV, there has been some improvement of stereotypical images of African Americans on television. There were five stereotypical roles of blacks between 1940-1970; the Tom, Coon, Mammie, Tragic Mulatto, and the Buck ...
    Related: black family, blacks, stereotypical, television, lower class
  • Cheever And Joyce - 1,177 words
    Cheever And Joyce Joyce and John Cheever were two influential writers of the late 1800's and early 1900's. James Joyce was an Irish author that wrote various short stories, novels, and poems. In Dubliners, he is noted for his epiphanies and objective correlatives. John Cheever, is an American short-story writer and novelist whose work is known for his portrayals of the average middle-class American. His works include ironic comedies and the displaying of his imagination. Both writers are duly noted for their short stories. Their unique styles of writings are respectably different to a point. They are similar in the way they display their descriptions, and differ in the way they present the o ...
    Related: cheever, james joyce, joyce, different types, stream of consciousness
  • Civil Rights Timeline - 1,392 words
    Civil Rights Timeline annon Jan. 15, 1929 - Dr. King is born - Born on Jan. 15, 1929, in Atlanta, Ga., he was the second of three children of the Rev. Michael (later Martin) and Alberta Williams King. Sept. 1, 1954 - Dr. King becomes pastor - In 1954, King accepted his first pastorate--the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Ala. He and his wife, Coretta Scott King, whom he had met and married (June 1953) while at Boston University. Dec. 1, 1955 - Rosa Parks defies city segregation - Often called 'the mother of the civil rights movement,' Rosa Louise McCauley Parks, b. Tuskegee, Ala., Feb. 4, 1913, sparked the 381-day Montgomery bus boycott that led to a 1956 Supreme Court order outl ...
    Related: 1965 voting rights act, civil rights, civil rights act, civil rights legislation, civil rights movement, right to vote, rights movement
  • Cloning Benefits - 1,742 words
    Cloning Benefits Cloning Benefits What if while walking down the street you encountered someone who looked exactly like you? Would you stare in amazement or would your heart be filled with fear? At first some people may look upon the idea of cloning with disgust and question themselves if humans should play God while others would be interested and study the many possibilities that cloning offers. This illustrates the path that cloning has taken over the latter part of the twentieth century. At first, when cloning was brought up in conversations, people tended to fearfully think of an army of identical persons marching across the earth in hopes of ruling humans. This and many other absurd not ...
    Related: cloning, human cloning, vitro fertilization, growth hormone, fertilization
  • Comparing The Daily Lives Of African American Women In The 1940s And Today - 1,840 words
    ... acy arises in a racially conscious society where Black women and Black men are still struggling with how to present their physical image and still be accepted in the society. It is very complex trying to negotiate your self-acceptance through two opposing cultures. Advertising in the 1930s had an impact on how African Americans defined themselves, particularly African American women. It is still the same more than 60 years later (Brown & Lieberson, 2000). Advertisers have successfully exploited the self-image of Black men and women. To be Black, especially if you were particularly dark, was loaded with negative stereotypes. Several products, promising miraculous transformations, were man ...
    Related: african, african american, afro american, american, american history, american journal, american life
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