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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: louis armstrong

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  • Louis Armstrong: His Childhood, And Early Years Of His Music - 1,095 words
    Louis Armstrong: His Childhood, And Early Years Of His Music Brian McLaughlin History of Jazz 12/18/98 Professor Torff Louis Armstrong: His childhood, and the early years of his music He was born in the south at a time when a black boy could expect nothing but to grow up, work hard at the lowest jobs all his life, and hope somehow, somewhere manage to stay healthy and get a little out of life.(P.1 Collier) Get a little out of life Louis did, a pure genius he revolutionized America's first true form of art, jazz. Doing a paper on Louis Armstrong has been enjoyable to do and the information that is available on Armstrong is endless. So much that this paper is going to concentrate on Louis Chil ...
    Related: early years, louis, louis armstrong, music, music career
  • Louis Armstrong: His Childhood, And Early Years Of His Music - 1,039 words
    ... re King Oliver was playing and would show up and ask to carry his bag and help out with other things. King Oliver started to help Louis out with his cornet. King Oliver recognized his talent and gave Lois jobs that he couldn't take. Storyville had closed and there was a mass exodus of musicians going North to Chicago. King Oliver Louis' mentor left while Louis stayed behind; he still didn't earn enough from his music to support himself. He took over King Olivers position in Kid Ory's band and made a name for himself around Chicago. He landed a job in Fat Marable's Orchestra and finally learned to read music. This also meant that Louis had to leave New Orleans in order to travel up and do ...
    Related: early years, louis, louis armstrong, music, music business
  • The Influence Of Louis Armstrong - 1,212 words
    The Influence Of Louis Armstrong Louis Armstrong was the most successful and talented jazz musician in history. His influence and expansive career continues to make waves in the jazz world. That is what made him become what he is to many today - a legend. Born on August 4, 1901, in the poorest section of New Orleans, Armstrong grew up with his grandparents due to his parents' separation. On January 1, 1913 he made a mistake which turned out to be the best thing that ever happened to him. At a New Year's celebration in downtown New Orleans, Louis Armstrong, also known as "Satchmo" and "Satch", fired a pistol into the air and was placed in the Colored Waifs' Home. It was there that he was intr ...
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  • The Prolific Trumpeter Who Became A World Ambassador For Jazz, Louis Armstrong Learned To Blow On A Bugle In Reform School Wh - 526 words
    The prolific trumpeter who became a world ambassador for jazz, Louis Armstrong learned to blow on a bugle in reform school when he was 13. His intuitive genius for improvisation changed the course of jazz, but after the 1940s mugging dominated his performances and he had his greatest success as a pop singer. Louis Daniel Armstrong popularly known as Satchmo and Pops was born on July 4, 1900, in New Orleans, the birthplace of American jazz. His father, Willie, was a day laborer in a turpentine plant, and his mother, Mayann (Mary Ann), worked chiefly as a domestic. His grandparents had been slaves. Dippermouth (his original nickname) picked up small change by singing and dancing with other str ...
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  • Billie Holiday - 545 words
    Billie Holiday Hi, I am Eleanor Fagan Gough, or most of you know me as Lady Day or Billie Holiday. I am known, as one of America's most memorable and influential singers of all time. I was born in Baltimore, in a run down apartment, in 1915. My mother had a very unsteady, low paying job, and my father ran out on us when I was very young. I had no choice but to try and find a way to make money for my mother and I. This led me to become a singer and a well-known legend. I am influential, people say, because I changed the style of jazz music, came from poverty to fame, and overcame a terrible drug addiction in my career. People say I'm influential because I changed the style of jazz music in an ...
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  • Ch Paul Whiteman A Classically Trained Violinist And Violist Who Adored Jazz But Lacked The Gift To Emulate The Uni - 1,055 words
    Ch.12 Paul Whiteman(1890-1967)= a classically trained violinist and violist who adored jazz but lacked the gift to emulate the uninhibited improvisations of the jazz musicians he admired, formed a dance band in the early twenties that played jazzy arrangements of popular and even classical melodies. Blues = a black vocal folk music, began as vocal (largely instrumental). Classical blues = based on 3 lines of text. Wild wame dont do the blues. Urban Blues = blues pieces written for publication and professional performance. W.C. Handy = father of the blues. Boggie woogie = arrived from blues (a popular piano style with the form and harmony of the blues, but a faster tempo and a dance beat. Jel ...
    Related: gift, jazz, jazz music, orleans jazz, whiteman
  • Cole Porter - 1,249 words
    ... her life. They were married on December 19, 1919 to live a happy but mostly successful although sexless marriage until Linda's death in 1954 The Later Years After early success with one-offs like Don't Fence Me In, re- released in a World War II musical called Hollywood Canteen, Cole signed some contracts to do work for the film industry. The first film to contain a Cole Porter song was The Battle of Paris from 1929, but his two tunes from that movie had little impact on his career because of the low quality of the film in general. Cole was happy with many aspects of the Hollywood community, including the liberal gay enclave called movie industry population. Although there is some disput ...
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  • Cole Porter - 1,249 words
    ... her life. They were married on December 19, 1919 to live a happy but mostly successful although sexless marriage until Linda's death in 1954 The Later Years After early success with one-offs like Don't Fence Me In, re- released in a World War II musical called Hollywood Canteen, Cole signed some contracts to do work for the film industry. The first film to contain a Cole Porter song was The Battle of Paris from 1929, but his two tunes from that movie had little impact on his career because of the low quality of the film in general. Cole was happy with many aspects of the Hollywood community, including the liberal gay enclave called movie industry population. Although there is some disput ...
    Related: cole, cole porter, porter, indiana jones, great white
  • Composers Of 19th And 20th - 1,024 words
    Composers Of 19th And 20th This essay will consist of information about nine composers and one piece of work that they are known for dating from 1862 to 1990. The names of these composers are: Aaron Copeland, Claude Debussy, Charles Ives, Scott Joplin, Bessie Smith, Louis Armstrong, Leonard Berstein, Igor Stravinsky, and Arnold Schoenberg. The first composer I will discuss will be Aaron Copeland (1900 1990). Mr. Copeland was born in Brooklyn, New York USA to Russian American immigrant parents. His style is strongly tonal with polychords, polyrhythm, changing meters and percussive orchestration. His influences include his teacher Nadia Boulanger, Picasso, Stravinsky and Ernest Hemmingway. So ...
    Related: bessie smith, claude debussy, scott joplin, leonard, bars
  • Composers Of 19th And 20th - 1,000 words
    ... will be the great Louis "Satchmo" Armstrong (1901 1971). Louis Daniel Armstrong was born in the Storyville District of New Orleans, Louisiana, on August 4, 1901, he always celebrated his birth as July 4, 1900 because that is what he was told and that is what he believed. His real date of birth was not known until after his death July 6, 1971. Mr. Armstrongs style of music was New Orleans Style Jazz. Some of his influences include his family, Peter Davis, and Joe "King" Oliver. Some notable history pertaining to Mr. Armstrong is that he came from a crime-ridden community. He was arrested at thirteen for firing a gun in the air at a New Years Celebration, and then was virtually saved by ...
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  • Duke Ellington - 1,485 words
    Duke Ellington The Harlem Renaissance was an era full of life, excitement, and activity. The world in all aspects was in gradual recovery from the depression. The world of music was expanding, sharing its enthusiasm throughout the world. The evolution of jazz aroused the curiosity of the nation. As Blacks received their freedom, they were able to express themselves as talented individuals. Certain blacks contributed immensely to the era of jazz, for example, Duke Ellington. Ellington entered a brand-new, exciting era as he grew up. As Ellington became an adolescent, the entertainment world was undergoing rapid, change. The change was driven by the deep, persuasive shift in the American spiri ...
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  • Duke Ellington - 794 words
    Duke Ellington Duke Ellington By the time of his passing, he was considered amongst the worlds greatest composers and musicians. The French government honored him with their highest award, the Legion of Honor, while the government of the United States bestowed upon him the highest civil honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He played for the royalty and for the common people and by the end of his fifty-year career, he had played over 20,000 performances worldwide. He was the Duke, Duke Ellington Edward Kennedy Ellington was born into the world on April 28, 1899 in Washington, D.C. Dukes parents Daisy Kennedy Ellington and James Edward Ellington served as ideal role models for young Duke ...
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  • Duke Ellington - 795 words
    Duke Ellington Duke Ellington Duke Ellington By the time of his passing, he was considered amongst the world's greatest composers and musicians. The French government honored him with their highest award, the Legion of Honor, while the government of the United States bestowed upon him the highest civil honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He played for the royalty and for the common people and by the end of his fifty-year career, he had played over 20,000 performances worldwide. He was the Duke, Duke Ellington Edward Kennedy Ellington was born into the world on April 28, 1899 in Washington, D.C. Duke's parents Daisy Kennedy Ellington and James Edward Ellington served as ideal role model ...
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  • Duke Ellington - 793 words
    Duke Ellington Duke Ellington By the time of his passing, he was considered amongst the world's greatest composers and musicians. The French government honored him with their highest award, the Legion of Honor, while the government of the United States bestowed upon him the highest civil honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He played for the royalty and for the common people and by the end of his fifty-year career, he had played over 20,000 performances worldwide. He was the Duke, Duke Ellington Edward Kennedy Ellington was born into the world on April 28, 1899 in Washington, D.C. Duke's parents Daisy Kennedy Ellington and James Edward Ellington served as ideal role models for young Duk ...
    Related: duke, duke ellington, ellington, the duke, miles davis
  • Duke Ellington - 795 words
    Duke Ellington Duke Ellington Duke Ellington By the time of his passing, he was considered amongst the world's greatest composers and musicians. The French government honored him with their highest award, the Legion of Honor, while the government of the United States bestowed upon him the highest civil honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He played for the royalty and for the common people and by the end of his fifty-year career, he had played over 20,000 performances worldwide. He was the Duke, Duke Ellington Edward Kennedy Ellington was born into the world on April 28, 1899 in Washington, D.C. Duke's parents Daisy Kennedy Ellington and James Edward Ellington served as ideal role model ...
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  • History Of Singing Styles - 566 words
    History of Singing Styles History of Singing Styles There have been distinct stages in the development of music and particularly singing over the previous hundreds of years. Looking back now we can easily see where certain things interlinked to create a new style or method of singing. From the western side of things, the first significant frame was the operatic movement. This began in the early 1600's with the first ever Opera 1602. It was called Orpheo and was written by Monteverdi. The singing style that existed between 1600 and 1750 was known as Baroque. Baroque basically referred to a pure sound without verbrato. Some words to describe this is ornamental and florid. An example of a compo ...
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  • Jazz - 691 words
    Jazz As the United States entered the 1920's it was not as unified as one might think. Not one, but two societies existed. The Black society, whose ancestors had been oppressed throughout the ages, and the White society, the oppressors of these men and women. After emancipation the Whites no longer needed the Blacks, but were forced to live with them. The Blacks despised the Whites, but even so they became more like them in every way. Even though these two races had grown so similar over the past century and a half, they were still greatly diversified. One aspect of this great diversity was the difference in music trends. The White society was still in love with the European classical music. ...
    Related: jazz, jazz music, men and women, oxford university press, oppressed
  • Jazz - 1,388 words
    Jazz When it comes to music, most people don't say they like it. People say they like heavy metal, pop, rhythm and blues, or any other type of music, since they have their own preference to what type of music they like, not just enjoying the broad area of music. One of those types of music which many enjoy is jazz. Actually right now jazz is really big and popular in Europe, and is rising in its popularity in the USA through its many forms. Jazz does have many forms, so many that some people wouldn't consider just saying they like jazz, they would say they enjoyed bebop, ragtime, blues, or other types of jazz. Jazz has survived longer than many types of music, and it has always influenced th ...
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  • Jazz - 1,397 words
    ... used a lot more in jazz combos. Bebop totally redefined the way to improvise in a song, and it is full of creative and unique musical ideas, also called "licks". Famous people such as the saxophonist Charlie Parker, the trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie, and the drummer Max Roach created bebop during the 40s and the Postwar Decades, which was definitely a big leap for jazz. This style of jazz is less restricted, and improvisation involved longer phrases, more choruses, and more emotions. Modal jazz, also called free jazz, has no rules at all. It was created during the late 50s through the 70s. Improvisation has ultimate freedom and so does the songs. A famous trumpeter named Miles Davis helped ...
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  • Jazz Music The Roots Of Our Everyday Life - 648 words
    Jazz Music- The Roots Of Our Everyday Life What is Jazz? According to the dictionary, jazz is defined as, A kind of syncopated, highly rhythmic music originated by Southern blacks in the late 19th century (Jazz 232). But, everyone should at least agree that jazz is the mother of all music, and is referred to as the only art form originating in the United States (History 101 2). America was home to immigrants from all over Europe and beyond who wished to build a new life, or just needed to escape from the old. These people, often thought of as second-class, brought their culture with them to America, expressed it musically, and changed the music world as we know it today. Most early jazz was ...
    Related: everyday life, jazz, jazz history, jazz music, jazz singer, music, orleans jazz
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