Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: lonely

  • 506 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>
  • Allergies I Wondered Lonely As A Cloud, That Floats On High Oer Dales And Hills, When All At Once I Saw A Crowda Host Of Gold - 633 words
    ALLERGIES I wondered lonely as a cloud, that floats on high o'er dales and hills, when all at once I saw a crowd-a host of golden daffodils. William Wordsworth I hope he was taking an antihistamine. If he were not, he would develop signs and symptoms of allergies. These include, but are not limited to a sore throat; red, itchy, watery eyes; nasal congestion and drainage; coughing and sneezing. There are many remedies, from grandma's kitchen to the allergy research center. The allergy season is usually from late February to mid-May. Grass is the biggest offender during the latter part of the season. Pollens from trees and plants are released each year during early spring. There are cells floa ...
    Related: host, lonely, william wordsworth, news service, resort
  • Longer Lonely - 789 words
    No Longer Lonely The sun shone and the children gleefully played as the lonely man in the worn blue sweater sat feeding the birds. He sat there every day, just feeding the birds and watching the children have their fun. As I ran around the paths in the park, I could see him sitting there, always alone. I slowly jogged around the path and as I rounded the sharp corner, I looked for the man who usually sat on the old bench in the far corner of the park. I could see him sitting there, one ankle, clothed in a shocking white athletic sock, crossed over his knee. He wore the same thing every day, the clothes looked like they had seen better days. His muddy brown pants were threadbare and looked li ...
    Related: lonely, puerto rico, shining, knee
  • Buckley Jr - 2,624 words
    ... alleviate the symptoms of glaucoma; to improve appetite dangerously reduced from AIDS. They use it as an effective medicine, yet they are technically regarded as criminals, and every year many are jailed. Although more than 75 per cent of Americans believe that marijuana should be available legally for medical purposes, the Federal Government refuses to legalize access or even to sponsor research. 2. Drugs are here to stay. The time has come to abandon the concept of a "drug-free society." We need to focus on learning to live with drugs in such a way that they do the least possible harm. So far as I can ascertain, the societies that have proved most successful in minimizing drug-related ...
    Related: buckley, war on drugs, johns hopkins, community policing, stick
  • 1984 By George Orwell - 983 words
    1984 By George Orwell "War is peace. Freedom is slavery. Ignorance is strength." This is the slogan of the Ministry of Truth, a branch of the totalitarian government in post-war London. The figurehead of this government is Big Brother, who employs a vast army of informers called the Thought Police who watch and listen to every citizen at all times through a device called a telescreen for the least signs of criminal deviation or unorthodox thoughts. This novel, like Orwells earlier work Animal Farm and Aldous Huxleys Brave New World, is an example of anti-utopian fiction, that kind of fiction which shows man at the mercy of some force over which he has no control. Anti-utopian novels are usua ...
    Related: 1984, george orwell, orwell, brave new world, human experience
  • 1984 Vs Animal Farm - 1,278 words
    1984 Vs. Animal Farm 1984 vs. Animal Farm 1984, by George Orwell, is a very powerful drama which involves man and totalitarian society. It is a story of a lonely rebel whose only valuable is his mind and who later conspires with another in an attempt to separate from their increasingly dominant hate-infested society. In 1984, Orwell depicts the susceptibility of today's society and its possibility of becoming a realm of lies. In it, the masses live in constant fear, being monitored at all times. He also admonishes the fact that this society can be in store for us in the future. The main theme of 1984 is that without independent thought and freedom, corruption can and will transform decent or ...
    Related: 1984, animal farm, farm, main theme, leon trotsky
  • 65279 The Life And Works Of James Weldon Johnson - 1,420 words
    THE LIFE AND WORKS OF JAMES WELDON JOHNSON James Weldon Johnson was a writer, diplomat, professor, and editor,who also described himself as a man of letters and a civil rights leader. Even though, he is no longer living, James Weldon Johnson has left much abouthis contributions to African American literature. Johnson was born June 17,1871 in Jacksonville, Florida to James and Helen Louise (Dallied) Johnson. Johnsons father, James Johnson, was born a freeman and was of mixed ancestry. He was a headwaiter in St. James Hotel. Mr. Johnson taughthis son how to speak Spanish as a young boy. Johnsons mother, Helen Johnson, was born a free woman in the West Indies. Mrs. Helen was awoman of French an ...
    Related: james weldon johnson, johnson, weldon, weldon johnson, works cited
  • A Crime In The Neigborhood - 1,324 words
    A Crime In The Neigborhood A Crime In The Neigborhood It was the summer of 1972 when Spring Hill, a Washington, D.C., suburb, got its first taste of an increasingly violent, insecure modern world. The quiet residential area, whose inhabitants traditionally left their doors unlocked and spent the summers attending one another's cookout, was rocked by the news that 12-year-old Boyd Ellison had been raped and murdered, his body dumped behind the local mall. While shaken residents organized a neighborhood watch program and clued detectives in on anyone's suspicious behavior, the inhabitants of at least one house were distracted by a tragedy of their own: 10-year-old Marsha Eberhardt's father, La ...
    Related: crime, young child, neighborhood watch, modern world, yard
  • A Farewell To Arms By Ernest Hemingway 1899 1961 - 1,322 words
    A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway (1899 - 1961) A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway (1899 - 1961) Type of Work: Psychological realism Setting Italy and Switzerland; World War I Principal Characters Fyederic Henry, an American in the Italian army Catiteritte Barkley, a British nurse Rinaldi, an Italian surgeon and Frederic's friend Miss Ferguson, a British nurse and Catherine's friend Story Overveiw Lieutenant Frederic Henry, a handsome young American, had returned from leave in southern Italy to the front, where he served in the Italian ambulance corps. The war was still leaning toward victory for the Italians. During dinner, Lieutenant Rinaldi, Frederic's jovial surgeon friend needl ...
    Related: a farewell to arms, ernest, ernest hemingway, farewell, farewell to arms, hemingway
  • A Few Greek Gods - 1,919 words
    A Few Greek Gods subject = History 9th grade title = A Few Greek Gods The Ancient Greeks believed in a series of myths which explained nature, set up a moral code for the people, and were just folk lore of the people. In this paper, the beginnings of myths, the Greek gods themselves, and several myths concerning morals, nature, and old lore of the Ancients will be discussed. Because the myths and details about the gods were passed along by word of mouth, some myths or gods might be interchanged or different. The Greek myths started as folk lore until it began to explain nature and storytellers integrated a moral code into the myths. Many myths started out as fairy tales. As new and more effi ...
    Related: greek, greek gods, greek myth, moral code, river styx
  • A Line Of Promises - 1,314 words
    A Line Of Promises A Line of Promises Many times simple objects in peoples lives can come to represent a part of themselves. The object can become an integral part of a persons identity. In Wedding-Ring by Denise Levertov, the relationship between a woman and her old wedding ring is explored as a way to intertwine the womans life with the rings meaning. Through the ring, the woman identifies herself. The wedding ring is wishfully transformed from a complex symbol of promises to a simple gift of friendship. In the opening of Wedding-Ring, Levertov sets the tone of the poem, by exemplifying the interaction between the speakers feelings and the wedding ring. My wedding ring lies in a basket / a ...
    Related: true value, power over, negative aspects, abandoned, bright
  • A Lot Of Great Canadian Authors Base Their Books On The Prairie Or Land And Its Inhabitants Wild Geese By Martha Ostenso Is A - 1,025 words
    A lot of great Canadian authors base their books on the prairie or land and its inhabitants. Wild Geese by Martha Ostenso is a wonderful example of this. Throughout the novel, many references are made to natural elements and also animals. Three very noticeable references could be picked out. These references were made to Judith, who is seen as a wild horse, to the wild geese that always move to new places, and also to the weather and how the family's attitudes and emotions, especially Caleb's, are changed by it. Wild Geese are talked about quite frequently throughout this novel. There are many references to people who are compared to the wild goose, along with what they symbolize. Lind Arche ...
    Related: authors, canadian, inhabitants, martha, prairie
  • A More Perfect Union: - 1,022 words
    ... e power to regulate trade, the southern states would be nothing more than overseers for the Northern States. On August 21 the debate over the issue of commerce became very closely linked to another explosive issue--slavery. When Martin of Maryland proposed a tax on slave importation, the convention was thrust into a strident discussion of the institution of slavery and its moral and economic relationship to the new government. Rutledge of South Carolina, asserting that slavery had nothing at all to do with morality, declared, Interest alone is the governing principle with nations. Sherman of Connecticut was for dropping the tender issue altogether before it jeopardized the convention. Ma ...
    Related: more perfect union, articles of confederation, bill of rights, northern states, mason
  • A Portrait Of The Artist As A Young Man - 822 words
    A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man A Portrait of Stephen Dedalus as a Young Man A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is above all a portrait of Stephen Dedalus. It is through Stephen that we see his world, and it is his development from sensitive child to rebellious young man that forms the plot of the novel. There are many Stephens, often contradictory. He is fearful yet bold, insecure yet proud, lonely and at the same time afraid of love. One Stephen is a romantic who daydreams of swashbuckling heroes and virginal heroines. The other is a realist at home on Dublin's most sordid streets. One Stephen is too shy to kiss the young lady he yearns for. The other readily turns to prostitu ...
    Related: artist, portrait, portrait of the artist as a young man, greek myth, different aspects
  • A Rose For Emily - 1,067 words
    A Rose For Emily "A Rose for Emily" In "A Rose for Emily," William Faulkner's symbolic use of the "rose" is essential to the story's theme of Miss Emily's self-isolation. The rose is often a symbol of love, and portrays an everlasting beauty. The rose has been used for centuries to illustrate an everlasting type of love and faithfulness. Even when a rose dies, it is still held in high regard. Miss Emily's "rose" exists only within the story's title. Faulkner leaves the reader to interpret the rose's symbolic meaning. Miss Emily was denied the possibility of falling in love in her youth, so subsequently she isolated herself from the world and denied the existence of change. Miss Emily was den ...
    Related: a rose for emily, emily, emily grierson, emily william faulkner, miss emily grierson, rose for emily
  • A Rose For Emily - 383 words
    A Rose For Emily Reading To Kill A Mockingbird and A Rose For Emily I noticed several differences and likenesses. I would like to convey my thoughts to you. Females in "A Rose For Emily" are depicted as reclusive, crazy, and nosy. Females in "To Kill A Mockingbird" are depicted as smart, outgoing, and full of pride. For example, Emily and Aunt Alexandra are both full of pride. Emily is so full of pride that when she finds out that Homer Barron is not going to marry her and that he is gay that she kills him. She lets the town think that they are married. When in fact she kills him. Emily is afraid of what the town will say about her. Aunt Alexandra is full of a different kind of pride. She is ...
    Related: a rose for emily, emily, rose for emily, to kill a mockingbird, homer barron
  • A Rose, The Universal Symbol Of Love - 637 words
    A Rose, the Universal Symbol of Love In William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily, Miss Emily Grierson is a lonely old woman, living a life void of all love and affection; although the rose only directly appears in the title, the rose surfaces throughout the story as a symbol. In contemporary times, the rose also symbolizes emotions like love and friendship. The rose symbolizes dreams of romances and lovers. These dreams belong to women, who like Emily Grierson, have yet to experience true love for themselves. Throughout the life of Emily Grierson, she remains locked up, never experiencing love from anyone but her father. She lives a life of loneliness, left only to dream of the love missing from ...
    Related: true love, rose for emily, william faulkner, contemporary times, teaches
  • A Separate Peace - 768 words
    A Separate Peace Breaking The Mold In John Knowle's, A Separate Peace, there is a transformation in all the key elements in the book, from the rivers to the tree to the seasons to the characters. The transformation is specifically seen in Leper, Gene, and Phineas. These three young men experience a change not just because of the transitions through adolescence. These changes also come about because of the war, the school, and an injury. Leper Lepellier is a very odd young man. He is quiet and is finds himself always taken by surprise. He really is not popular and that does not concern him in any way. Leper really has no true friends at the Devon school, but talks to Gene. He entertains himse ...
    Related: separate peace, john knowles, lonely, collecting
  • A Streetcar Named Desire - 1,024 words
    ... ords used by Williams. In the first scene Blanche is described as "daintily dressed" and mentions that she is "incongruous to her setting" (Williams 96). Blanche cannot adapt to her surroundings, but instead tries to change them. Later in the story she says "You saw it before I came. Well, look at it now! This room is almost-dainty!" (Williams 176). By using the word dainty in both places Williams shows us how Blanche tries to change her surrounding to match her, instead of adapting to them. This will not work with Stanley. Blanche deceives everyone for a good portion of the play. However, Stanley is continually trying to find her true history. Blanche says "I don't want realism. I want ...
    Related: named desire, streetcar, streetcar named, streetcar named desire, tennessee williams
  • A Streetcar Named Desire Symbols - 1,024 words
    ... rds used by Williams. In the first scene Blanche is described as "daintily dressed" and mentions that she is "incongruous to her setting" (Williams 96). Blanche cannot adapt to her surroundings, but instead tries to change them. Later in the story she says "You saw it before I came. Well, look at it now! This room is almost-dainty!" (Williams 176). By using the word dainty in both places Williams shows us how Blanche tries to change her surrounding to match her, instead of adapting to them. This will not work with Stanley. Blanche deceives everyone for a good portion of the play. However, Stanley is continually trying to find her true history. Blanche says "I dont want realism. I want ma ...
    Related: named desire, streetcar, streetcar named, streetcar named desire, new orleans
  • A Traveler Is Resolute And Independent - 1,973 words
    A Traveler is Resolute and Independent Tenets of Wordsworth in Resolution and Independence Romanticism officially began in 1798, when William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge anonymously published Lyrical Ballads. This work marked the official beginning of a literary period which had already begun many years before 1798. A work is defined to be of a certain period by its characteristics, therefore to be considered a Romantic work, the work must contain aspects which are termed "Romantic." A few typical "Romantic" aspects are: love of the past; sympathy to the childs mind; faith in the inner goodness of man; aspects of nature having religious, mystic, and symbolic significance; and reco ...
    Related: traveler, william wordsworth, role model, lyrical ballads, sleepless
  • 506 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>