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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: aristotle

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  • According To Aristotle, A Tragedy Is A Form Of Theater That Replicates A Solemn Action With The Intention Of Stirring Dread A - 1,073 words
    According to Aristotle, a tragedy is a form of theater that replicates a solemn action with the intention of stirring dread and sympathy in the viewer. Sophocles Antigone and Arthur Millers All My Sons both fit into this category. Both stories consist of a tragic hero, Creon and Joe Keller in this instance. According to Aristotles Poetics, a tragic hero is someone not all good or all bad, and whose downfall is caused by a tragic flaw or "hamartia". Later the hero comes to a realization of their flaw, which usually comes too late for them to redeem themselves. Creon and Keller are both tragic heroes that fit into Aristotles model, whose downfall is caused by greed, excessive pride and a belat ...
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  • Aristotle - 2,339 words
    ... graphy ARISTOTLE Aristotle is considered one of the greatest minds of classical Greece. Dante even proclaimed him the master of those who know. He made tremendous contributions in the areas of science and mathematics, not to mention philosophy. In fact, he contributed extensively to chemistry, physics, biology, created formal logic, thoroughly studied systems of government, and developed a biological classification system. However, the majority of those alive at the time took greater stock in his political philosophies. It is important to know that Aristotle was one of the first men to explore science, anatomy, and the animal kingdom in depth and to recognize his considerable contributio ...
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  • Aristotle - 1,015 words
    Aristotle Atirtotle's Politics Aristotle's Politics is a timeless examination of government structure and human nature that explains his ideas on how a utopian state can be achieved. In this work, Aristotle examines ubiquitous issues such as government structure, education, crime, property ownership, the honesty of occupations, and population control. He states in Book IV, Chapter Eleven ... the best form of political association is one where power is vested in the middle class, and secondly, that good government is attainable in those cities where there is a large middle class ... The polis is a partnership of citizens in a system of government that serves to achieve the common good. It is ...
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  • Aristotle - 511 words
    Aristotle Aristotle discusses the ideal state and citizens. In his ideal state, Aristotle states about the features of citizens and answers the question of who sould be citizen? . The concept of citizen is very important in his ideal state, because according to Aristotle citizens have the fullest sovereign power, and it would be ridiculous to deny their participation in the state management. Aristole's inspiration is from biology. It depends on teleology. Teleology is about purposefullness.Everything has a purpose. So the form of the citizen is like that. Aristotle argues that citizens have a common purpose for the stability of association, because they are the most important part of society ...
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  • Aristotle - 1,798 words
    Aristotle Let us again return to the good we are seeking, and ask what it can be. It seems different in different actions and arts; it is different in medicine, in strategy, and in the other arts likewise. What then is the good of each? Surely that for whose sake everything else is done. In medicine this is health, in strategy victory, in architecture a house, in any other sphere something else, and in every action and pursuit the end; for it is for the sake of this that all men do whatever else they do. Therefore, if there is an end for all that we do, this will be the good achievable by action, and if there are more than one, these will be the goods achievable by action. So the argument ha ...
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  • Aristotle - 378 words
    Aristotle Aristotle Aristotle was a Greek philosopher, educator, and scientist. He was one of the greatest and most influential thinkers in Western culture. He familiarized himself with the entire development of Greek thought preceding him. In his own writings, Aristotle considered, summarized, criticized, and further developed all the intellectual tradition that he had inherited from his teacher, Plato. Aristotle was the first philosopher to analyze the process whereby certain propositions can be logically inferred to be true from the fact that certain other propositions are true. He believed that this processor logical inference was based on a form of argument he called the syllogism. In a ...
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  • Aristotle - 1,197 words
    Aristotle Aristotle was born in 384 BC.; with him came the birth of Western realism. He was a student of Plato and a tutor to Alexander the Great (Founders, 1991). It is difficult to discuss the philosophies of Aristotle without bringing up those of his former tutor, Plato. Aristotle's philosophies diverted from Plato's, and led to Aristotle forming his own school, the Lyceum. After tutoring Alexander the Great for about five years, he founded the Lyceum in Athens, Greece (Wheelwright, 1983). The Lyceum was a philosophical school that dealt in matters such as metaphysics, logic, ethics, and natural sciences. When teaching at the Lyceum, Aristotle had a habit of walking about as he discoursed ...
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  • Aristotle - 445 words
    Aristotle Aristotle was one of the most influential thinkers in western culture, and a Greek philosopher, teacher, and scientist. He was probably the most scholarly and learned of the ancient Greek Philosophers. Aristotle mastered the entire development of Greek though before him and employed this knowledge in his writings. He criticized, summarized, and furthered the development of the Greek philosophies. Aristotle, along with his teacher Plato, are the two most important Greek Philosophers. Aristotle was born in Satagira, a small town in Greece. Aristotles father worked as a personal physician for the grandfather of Alexander The Great. Both of Aristotles parents died when he was a boy, he ...
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  • Aristotle - 302 words
    Aristotle Although Aristotle was best know for his work in philosophy and the natural sciences, he was also a poet. Poetry, to the Greeks, included drama. Aristotle used the same methodology in poetry as he used in science. Aristotle made many contributions to the world, and much of his work still exists today. In 384/3 B.C., Aristotle was born in the small of Stagira. Stagira is located on the eastern coast of the peninsula of Chalcidice in Thrace. Aristotles father Nicomachus was a court physician and a friend of Amyntas II, the king of Macedon and the father of Philip the Great. Proxenus of Atarneus, adopted Aristotle when his father died. When he was eighteen, Aristotle was sent to Athen ...
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  • Aristotle - 847 words
    Aristotle Aristotle, Galileo, and Pasteur can be said to have contributed significantly, each in his own way, to the development of "The Scientific Method." Discuss. What is the scientific method? In general, this method has three parts, which we might call (1) gathering evidence, (2) making a hypothesis, and (3) testing the hypothesis. As scientific methodology is practiced, all three parts are used together at all stages, and therefore no theory, however rigorously tested, is ever final, but remains at all times tentative, subject to new observation and continued testing by such observation. Hellenic science was built upon the foundations laid by Thales and Pythagoras. It reached its zenit ...
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  • Aristotle - 1,142 words
    Aristotle An ethical issue that is debated in our society is the concern of driving while intoxicated. Although this was naturally not the case during Aristotles time, many of his ethical beliefs can be applied to refute this dilemma. I will prove the standing issue to be unethical through Aristotles discussion of virtue and his concept of voluntary/involuntary actions in the Nicomachean Ethics. Aristotle believed that of the virtues learned in our youth, each has a respective excess and deficiency. The virtue is the mean (or midpoint) of the excess and deficiency. The mean can be thought of as just right, and the extremities can be labeled as vices. The mean should not be thought of as the ...
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  • Aristotle And Parmenides On Change - 1,076 words
    Aristotle And Parmenides On Change ARISTOTLE AND PARMENIDES ON CHANGE Looking at the arguments for change derived by Parmenides and Aristotle there are many differences, yet there are also some similarities. While Aristotle may disagree with much of Parmenides argument, he does agree with some of the strongest premises in the argument. In this paper I will present Aristotles rebuttal of Parmenides denial of change, as well as play the devils advocate for each of them in defending their views. At the beginning of Parmenides argument for change he asserts that not being is nothingness. Aristotle is in disagreement with this premise, because he believes that being has many meanings, and is not ...
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  • Aristotle B 384 D 322 Bc, Was A Greek Philosopher, Logician, - 1,556 words
    Aristotle (b. 384 - d. 322 BC), was a Greek philosopher, logician, and scientist. Along with his teacher Plato, Aristotle is generally regarded as one of the most influential ancient thinkers in a number of philosophical fields, including political theory. Aristotle was born in Stagira in northern Greece, and his father was a court physician to the king of Macedon. As a young man he studied in Plato's Academy in Athens. After Plato's death he left Athens to conduct philosophical and biological research in Asia Minor and Lesbos, and he was then invited by King Philip II of Macedon to tutor his young son, Alexander the Great. Soon after Alexander succeeded his father, consolidated the conquest ...
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  • Aristotle Hapiness Essay - 596 words
    Aristotle -Hapiness Essay Aristotle's view on the nature of human life: Is it correct? Essay written by Adrian from Gonzaga HS!! Is life really about the 'money', the 'cash', the 'hoes', who has the biggest gold chain or who drives the shiniest or fastest car, who sells the most albums or who has the most respect? Aristotle challenges views, which are similar to the ones held and shown by rap artists such as Jay-Z and the Notorious B.I.G., by observing that everything in the universe, including humans, has a telos, or goal in life. He states that the goal of a human life is to achieve happiness or eudaimonia. I believe that Aristotle is completely correct in his reasoning of the purpose of h ...
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  • Aristotle On Animal Experimentation - 302 words
    Aristotle On Animal Experimentation Aristotle would indeed not approve of experiments performed on animals. He seems to put much emphasis throughout his writings on the similarity of the animal and humans. He also puts much emphasis on the fact that animals and plants are very different. The only thing animals lack, according to Aristotle, that differentiate them from humans is a mind. He says that nutrition is shared by all natural living organisms but animals have perception in addition, and among natural organisms humans alone have mind. The mind is exclusively a human property. However, Aristotles many other examples that make animals human-like indicate that he would not be one for anim ...
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  • Aristotle On Pleasure - 2,610 words
    Aristotle On Pleasure After nine books of contemplating different aspects of the human good, Aristotle uses this opportunity to claim contemplation as the highest form of pleasure. The final book in Nicomachean Ethics is concerned with pleasures: the understanding of each kind, and why some pleasures are better than other pleasures. The book is essentially divided into two main parts, being pleasure and happiness. I will use Terence Irwin's translation and subdivisions as a guiding map for my own enquiry, and any quotation from will be taken from this text. Irwin divides the book into three sections: Pleasure, Happiness: Further discussion, and Ethics, Moral Education and Politics. With this ...
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  • Aristotle On Pleasure - 2,533 words
    ... e not as being of the essence of youth but as following from a favorable condition of the causes of youth. Likewise pleasure follows from a favorable condition of the causes of the activity. (Aquinas, p86-7) After making clear his earlier points, Aristotle then goes on to discuss the properties of pleasure. First he looks at the duration of pleasure and acknowledges that it can not go on continuously because "nothing human is capable of continuous activity, and hence, no continuous pleasure arises either, since pleasure is a consequence of activity"(1175a5). Because humans would grow tired of whatever activity was bringing them pleasure, eventually they would have to stop. Were someone t ...
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  • Aristotle On Rhetoric - 1,210 words
    Aristotle On Rhetoric ristotle (384-322 B.C.) was a Greek philosopher, educator, and scientist. He was able to combine the thoughts of Socrates and Plato to create his own ideas and definition of rhetoric. He wrote influential works such as Rhetoric and Organon, which presented these new ideas and theories on rhetoric. Much of what is Western thought today evolved from Aristotle's theories and experiments on rhetoric. Aristotle's Life Aristotle was born in 384 B.C., in Northern Greece. His father was a physician to the king of Macedonia, Amyntas II. Amyntas II was the grandfather of Alexander the Great. When Aristotle was still a boy, both of his parents died; so he was raised by a guardian ...
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  • Aristotle On Rhetoric - 1,207 words
    ... scientist. While at Plato's school, Aristotle developed a personal affection for Plato and learned many things from his instructor. However, he ultimately rejected Plato's fundamental concepts and developed his own theories on matters of logic, ethics, metaphysics, as well as rhetoric. After the death of Plato in 347 B.C., Aristotle moved in with a former pupil of Plato, Hermeias. During his three year stay, he married princess Pithias, Hermeias's daughter. The couple had two children: a son named Nicomachus as well as a daughter. In 342 B.C Aristotle was invited to direct the education of young prince Alexander at the court of Philip II of Macedonia. During this time he continued his s ...
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  • Aristotle On Tragedy - 1,046 words
    Aristotle on Tragedy Aristotle on Tragedy The Nature of Tragedy: In the century after Sophocles, the philosopher Aristotle analyzed tragedy. His definition: Tragedy then, is an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude; in language embellished with each kind of artistic ornament, the several kinds being found in separate parts of the play; in the form of action, not of narrative; through pity and fear effecting the proper purgation of these emotions. Aristotle identified six basic elements: (1) plot; (2) character; (3) diction (the choice of style, imagery, etc.); (4) thought (the character's thoughts and the author's meaning); (5) spectacle (all the visual ...
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