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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: liver disease

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  • Alcohol Abuse Among College Students And Possible Solutions - 1,040 words
    Alcohol Abuse Among College Students And Possible Solutions Running head: ALCOHOL ABUSE AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS Alcohol Abuse Among College Students and Possible Solutions Terry McDaniel Georgia Southern University Abstract Binge or excessive drinking is the most serious problem affecting social life, health, and education on college campuses today including the campus of Georgia Southern University. Binge or excessive drinking by college students has become a social phenomena in which college students do not acknowledge the health risks that are involved with their excessive drinking habits. Furthermore college students do not know enough about alcohol in general and what exactly it does to ...
    Related: abuse, alcohol, alcohol abuse, college campuses, college drinking, college students
  • Alcoholism - 1,581 words
    Alcoholism Alcoholism is a disease of epidemic proportions, affecting 9.3 to 10 million Americans, and many professionals believe the figures are closer to 20 million (Weddle and Wishon). Alcoholism is a "physiological or physiological dependence on alcohol characterized by the alcoholics inability to control the start or termination of his drinking"(Encyclopedia Britannica 210). It consists of frequent and recurring consumption of alcohol to an extent that causes continued harm to the drinker and leads to medical and social problems. Alcoholism, however, does not merely cause harm to the alcoholic, but to the entire family as well, affecting an estimated 28 million children in this country ...
    Related: alcoholism, high school, human beings, social problems, fail
  • Alcoholosm - 1,165 words
    ... ven a small head size. Furthermore, FAS children may develop hearing problems, heart defects and physical and behavioural problems. Researchers have also found that some children who were exposed to alcohol during fetal development show only some of the characteristics of FAS, these children are diagnosed as having fetal alcohol effects (FAE). However, both FAS and FAE individuals may have some degree of brain damage (Brent, 1991). Clearly, in addition to physiological, social, and psychological factors which all play a role in contributing to alcoholism, recent studies reveal that there may be a genetic predisposition to alcoholism. More specifically, medical research indicates that alc ...
    Related: natural history, university press, york oxford university press, science, abnormal
  • Anabolic Steroids - 1,099 words
    Anabolic Steroids Anabolic steroids (steroids for short) are used widely among bodybuilders to increase their testosterone, thus to get stacked or larger. Steroids seem to be a wonderful thing for these bodybuilders, but very few of them know just how they work and what the effects are. History The word "anabolic" portrays any substance, which accumulates nitrogen in muscle protein and from there builds muscle tissue. The bodys natural anabolic steroid is called testosterone, which men (naturally) obtain more of, than women do. Testosterone brings on the development of speed, mass, endurance, definition, and strength. Testosterone is naturally released into the blood stream, goes to differen ...
    Related: anabolic, anabolic steroids, steroid use, steroids, protein synthesis
  • Binge Drinking - 677 words
    Binge Drinking My report is on the disease binge drinking. Binge drinking is a dangerous drinking problem that many people have. A binge is defined as five or more alcoholic drinks in one sitting for a man, and four for a woman. Binge drinking is extremely common among American high school and college students. In fact, one-third of high school and college students admit to a binge in the last 30 days. I think that this high rate is reasonable since drinking is still seen as a popular activity in many colleges as seen in the horrible accidents in the newspaper or on television. On television shows and in movies binge drinking is rarely shown as a dangerous and horrible thing. Alcohol is more ...
    Related: binge, binge drinking, drinking, fetal alcohol syndrome, social issues
  • Clinical Chemistry In Medicine - 1,442 words
    Clinical Chemistry In Medicine Of the diagnostic methods available to veterinarians, the clinical chemistry test has developed into a valuable aid for localizing pathologic conditions. This test is actually a collection of specially selected individual tests. With just a small amount of whole blood or serum, many body systems can be analyzed. Some of the more common screenings give information about the function of the kidneys, liver, and pancreas and about muscle and bone disease. There are many blood chemistry tests available to doctors. This paper covers the some of the more common tests. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) is an end-product of protein metabolism. Like most of the other molecules i ...
    Related: chemistry, clinical, medicine, energy source, liver disease
  • Clinical Chemistry In Medicine - 1,423 words
    ... toglobulins, which bind hemoglobin. Iron transport is related to beta-globulins. The glycoprotein that binds the iron is transferrin (Lehninger, 1993). Gamma-globulins (immunoglobulins) are associated with antibody formation. There are five different classes of immunoglobulins. IgG is the major circulating antibody. It gives immune protection within the body and is small enough to cross the placenta, giving newborns temporary protection against infection. IgM also gives protection within the body but is too large to cross the placenta. IgA is normally found in mucous membranes, saliva, and milk. It provides external protection. IgD is thought to function during the development and matura ...
    Related: chemistry, clinical, medicine, seventh edition, diabetes mellitus
  • Cloning Technology - 1,787 words
    Cloning Technology Technology is changing the world as we know it. Not all of these advances in technology are viewed as positive. One of the breakthroughs that has received mixed responses is the issue of cloning. There has been much debate on this topic, and the debate is certain to rage on for many years to come. You may be asking yourself: What is cloning? How can I benefit from cloning? Is cloning legal? Why should we clone human beings? What is the world community doing to control cloning? I hope to answer these and other questions throughout the course of this paper. What is cloning? According to the Human Cloning Foundation (HCF1998), cloning is a scientific process in which a strand ...
    Related: cloning, human cloning, technology, heart attack, tay sachs disease
  • Dothiepin Vs Fluoxetine Mechanism Of Action And Pharmacodynamics - 1,290 words
    Dothiepin Vs. Fluoxetine (Mechanism Of Action And Pharmacodynamics) Comparison Between Mechanism of Action and Pharmacodynamics of Dothiepin and Fluoxetine Description of medicines Mechanism of action and pharmacodynamics Dothiepin Dothiepin is a tricyclic antidepressant. It acts by promoting the effectiveness of several amines (dopamine, norepinephrine, and 5-hydroxytryptamine, which is also known as 5HT and serotonin). It functions by inhibiting their reuptake at the terminals of nerve cells, thus leading to their prolonged presence at the synaptic cleft and an increased effect on the neuron.(1) The reuptake pumps for the above amines are responsible for reducing the concentration of these ...
    Related: mechanism, gastrointestinal tract, heart disease, new zealand, linear
  • Dredging The Hudson River - 1,928 words
    Dredging The Hudson River For the past year, the subject of polychlorinated biphenyls in the Hudson River and what should be done about them has been discussed by politicians and residents all over the capital region. Often the top story on the local news, the front page headline of the newspaper, the subject of a special on television, or the reason for a town meeting, dredging has become a much debated topic. With all the information being exchanged and opinions published, it is easy for the average person to become confused. In an attempt to make things clear, the following report defines dredging, PCBs, and presents a short discussion of each side of the Hudson River dredging debate. POL ...
    Related: dredging, hudson, hudson river, water treatment, problems associated
  • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - 1,768 words
    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: A Preventable Birth Defect If women didnt drink anymore during pregnancy, there would never be another baby born with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome or Fetal Alcohol Effect (McCuen 33). This is a very powerful statement. It is also a very simple cure for an alarmingly high birth defect that all women have the power to stop. Every year more than 40,000 American children are born with defects because their mother drank alcohol while pregnant (McCuen 34). That is 1 to 3 per 1,000 live births (McCuen 31). Many of these cases go undiagnosed It is also the number one cause of mental retardation in the United States, and one of the three leading causes of bir ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol dependency, alcohol syndrome, drink alcohol, fetal, fetal alcohol, fetal alcohol syndrome
  • Gene Therapy Hemophilia - 1,090 words
    Gene Therapy- Hemophilia Genetic Therapy that focuses on hemophilia Gene therapy is reinserting certain genes that helps deal with genetic diseases. There are three basic forms of this gene therapy. The first is Gene Inactivation Therapy in which the transferred gene neutralizes the proteins and evens out the amount or rids of the defective proteins. Another type is Gene Augmentation Therapy where the original form of the gene or the normal form of the gene is inserted into one of the cells chromosomes. This procedure is used normally when a gene with little activity or a deleted gene is the cause for the genetic disease. The third type of gene therapy is Gene Replacement Therapy. This form ...
    Related: gene, gene therapy, hemophilia, therapy, skin cancer
  • Healthcare - 1,142 words
    Healthcare In today's fast-paced world where technology rules, the medical profession is also advancing. In 1991, 2,900 liver transplants were performed in the United States while there were 30,000 canidates for the procedure in the United States alone (Heffron, T. G., 1993). Due to shortages of available organs for donation/transplantation, specifically livers, once again science has come to the rescue. Although the procedure is fairly new in the United States, the concept of living organ donation is fast growing. Living related liver transplantion was first proposed as a theoretical entity in 1969 but it was not until almost twenty years later that the procedure became a clinical reality ( ...
    Related: healthcare, liver disease, medical profession, important role, holistic
  • Hepatitis - 1,662 words
    Hepatitis Hepatitis In modern society when a person gets sick with the flu or a cold they will usually go about their normal routine with the exception of a sneeze or a cough throughout the day. Sometimes things can be more than what they appear to be. The symptoms start out like the flu with coughing, fever, aches, and vomiting. However, the disease gradually worsens with symptoms of extreme weakness and excruciating abdominal pain. By then it is usually too late when the person finds out that their liver is failing and that there disease is caused by one of the most contagious, dangerous and deadliest of viruses. These viruses that were initially concealed by flu like symptoms are now know ...
    Related: hepatitis, hepatitis a, hepatitis b, hepatitis c, viral hepatitis
  • Hepatitis - 1,730 words
    Hepatitis Hepatitis In modern society when a person gets sick with the flu or a cold they will usually go about their normal routine with the exception of a sneeze or a cough throughout the day. Sometimes things can be more than what they appear to be. The symptoms start out like the flu with coughing, fever, aches, and vomiting. However, the disease gradually worsens with symptoms of extreme weakness and excruciating abdominal pain. By then it is usually too late when the person finds out that their liver is failing and that there disease is caused by one of the most contagious, dangerous and deadliest of viruses. These viruses that were initially concealed by flu like symptoms are now know ...
    Related: hepatitis, hepatitis a, hepatitis b, hepatitis c, viral hepatitis
  • Hepatitis B - 651 words
    Hepatitis B Hepatitis B can be prevented with a highly effective vaccine, but this year ten to thirty million people will become infected with the hepatitis B virus. I feel that because this disease is preventable, only knowledge can help reduce the number of people infected. Hepatitis B is a serious liver disease caused by the hepatitis B virus. This virus is a blood-borne pathogen. It is one hundred times more infectious than HIV. Hepatitis B is one of the most frequently reported vaccine preventable diseases in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control. This disease is transmitted through oral, vaginal, and anal sex. You can also acquire the disease through sharing n ...
    Related: hepatitis, hepatitis b, medical treatment, liver disease, carrier
  • Hepatitis B Can Be Prevented With A Highly Effective Vaccine, But This Year - 649 words
    Hepatitis B can be prevented with a highly effective vaccine, but this year ten to thirty million people will become infected with the hepatitis B virus. I feel that because this disease is preventable, only knowledge can help reduce the number of people infected. Hepatitis B is a serious liver disease caused by the hepatitis B virus. This virus is a blood-borne pathogen. It is one hundred times more infectious than HIV. "Hepatitis B is one of the most frequently reported vaccine preventable diseases in the United States," according to the Centers for Disease Control. This disease is transmitted through oral, vaginal, and anal sex. You can also acquire the disease through sharing needles, to ...
    Related: hepatitis, hepatitis b, highly effective, south america, disease control
  • Human Disease Research - 2,297 words
    Human Disease Research Human Disease IINTRODUCTION Human Disease, in medicine, any harmful change that interferes with the normal appearance, structure, or function of the body or any of its parts. Since time immemorial, disease has played a role in the history of societies. It has affected-and been affected by-economic conditions, wars, and natural disasters. Indeed, the impact of disease can be far greater than better-known calamities. An epidemic of influenza that swept the globe in 1918 killed between 20 million and 40 million people. Within a few months, more than 500,000 Americans died-more than were killed during World War I (1914-1918), World War II (1939-1945), the Korean War (1950- ...
    Related: alzheimer's disease, disease research, heart disease, human disease, huntington's disease, infectious disease, liver disease
  • Is Legalization A Realistic Alternative To The War On Drugs - 2,300 words
    Is Legalization A Realistic Alternative To The War On Drugs? For years, the issue of legalization has been an increasingly controversial subject. Millions of dollars are spent annually in the War on Drugs causing many to wonder if this fight is cost-effective or if an alternative such as legalization would be more realistic than current efforts in drug prevention. Opponents state that with legalization would come an increase not only in availability, but also with everything associated with that availability. This includes suffering of users and their loved ones, death of users and innocent alike, increases in health-care costs, cost to employers, drug-related crimes, and increases in variou ...
    Related: alcohol and drugs, drug abuse, drug control, drug laws, drug prohibition, drug usage, drugs
  • John Coltrane - 1,742 words
    John Coltrane A Brief Look Into The Life and Music of JOHN COLTRANE Pg. 1 John Coltrane was born in born in Hamlet, North Carolina on September 23, 1926. John Coltrane was an only child. His father, John was a tailor who played the violin and ukulele, and his mother Alice played piano and sang in the church choir. This was a great environment to foster his love of music. Coltrane soon moved with his family to the town of High Point, where his grandfather was the pastor of the A.M.E. Zion Church. His family was very religious and this instilled in him a deep devotion in religion. At the age of twelve Coltrane's received his first instrument a clarinet which he played for hours on end, that sa ...
    Related: coltrane, father john, john coltrane, atlantic city, religious life
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